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Full text of "Town Report"

78 7331 




-r^'swf 



Lincoln public Htbrarp 

February 1975 



c . 2 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport19631965linc 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 




MASSACHUSETTS 



iblic Library 

017y 




\ 



/- 




for 1963 






& 6 



Art work on Cover of 1963 
Town Report courtesy of 
Foster Nystrom, DeCordova 
Museum . 



CONTENTS 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 5 

Officers and Committees 14 

Town Clerk • 23 

FINANCE 

Treasurer 4 4 

Town Accountant 49 

Collector of Taxes 72 

Board of Assessors 74 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 76 

Civil Defense 80 

Tree Warden 81 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 82 

Inspector of Animals 84 

Public Welfare 85 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 86 

Board of Appeals 91 

Inspectors, Building, Wiring and Plumbing . . 93 

Hartwell School Building Addition Committee . 93 

Water Commissioners 94 

Conservation Commission . , . • 96 

Highway Department 97 

Cemetery Commissioners . 97 

Landscape Committee 98 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 99 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Library Trustees 100 

Recreation Committee 107 

Recreation Study Committee . 110 

Scholarship Fund Ill 

Bemis Fund Trustees 113 

DeCordova Museum ...... 114 

Elementary Schools 127 

Regional High School 153 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 186 

Valuation List 191 

Trust Funds 217 



Jveport 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



C^own of blncoin 



FOR THE YEAR 19 6 3 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



TOWN CALENDAR 

SELECTMEN — Every Monday of each month, 8:00 P. M. , 

Town Hall, 259-8850 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE -- First Monday of each month, 8:00 

P. M. , Superintendent's Office, 259-9400 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS -- First Tuesday of each month, 

8:00 P. M. , Town Hall, 259-8850 

WATER COMMISSIONERS -- Meetings by appointment 

BOARD OF HEALTH -- Meetings by appointment; call Dr. 

Gordon Donaldson, 259-8192 

BOARD OF APPEALS -- Meetings by appointment; call Town 

Hall, 259-8850 



PLANNING BOARD 

Population — 
Town Area — 



— Second Monday of each month, 8:00 
P. M. , Town Hall, 259-8850 

3,917 (1960 census) 

8 , 708 acres 



1963 Tax Rate -- $112 per $1,000 valuation 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -- First Monday in March after the 

fifteenth - March 16, 1964 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF TOWN OFFICERS -- Saturday following 

Town Meeting - March 21, 1964 

Qualifications for Registration - Twelve months continuous 

residence in the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts prior to March 16, 1964, and six 
months continuous residence in the Town 
of Lincoln prior to March 16, 19 64 

Town Offices - Open Monday through Friday 8:30 A. M. to 

5 P. M. Closed on Saturdays 



IN MEMORIAM 

Charles Kimball Fitts 

1908-1963 

Chairman of Selectmen of 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From March Nineteen Hundred and Fifty-six 



Cheerfully and happily committing and dedicating himself 
to service for others, he devoted more than a full measure 
of time and effort to serving the Town and its people, al- 
ways steadfastly preoccupied with developing and carrying 
out worthwhile policies. 

Always courteous and understanding, he was sensitive to 
the thoughts and considerations of others and in a high 
degree combined the qualities of leadership and team work. 

He fully realized that living public service is a most 
meaningful expression of participation in the lives of all 
people and can influence constructively results long dis- 
tant and not now seen. 

The Selectmen on behalf of his associates, of the many who 
shared the opportunity of working with him and of the Town 
of Lincoln express their deep regard for him, the pleasure 
and stimulation they have enjoyed in their service with 
him, and their deep sense of loss in his passing. 



BE IT RESOLVED: 

That this Board enter upon the records of the Town of 
Lincoln this expression of their deep affection for their 
sorely missed, beloved friend and send a copy to his un- 
derstanding wife and family. 



Lincoln, Massachusetts 
December Twenty-Three, Nineteen Hundred and Sixty-Three 




General Government 









BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The Board of Selectmen tries to implement policies 
which are based upon what the Board believes to be the 
underlying and primary hopes of the Town for the Town. 
These are : 

1. Maintaining the physical and intangible appear- 
ance and characteristics of the Town. 

2. The maintenance of an excellent system of 
education . 

3. Municipal services which provide adequate ser- 
vices and safety for the Town, in line with the 
size and demonstrated needs of the Town. 



We realize that these three 
are not wholly consistent with e 
upon Town finances and land uses 
a fair resolution of these impac 
remain as it is, in so far as is 
To achieve such a result require 
the forces that bear directly on 
stood, one realizes that the sta 
only if the Boards join in plann 
which will result in a realistic 



basic desir 

ach other in 

We try t 

ts so that t 

realistical 
s careful pi 

the Town ar 
tus quo can 
ing and impl 

adjustment 



es of t 

their 
o bring 
he Town 
ly poss 
anning. 
e fully 
be main 
ement in 
and res 



he Town 
impact 

about 

will 
ible. 
When 

under- 
tained 
g actio: 
olution 



Strong forces that impinge upon the Town are: 

1. The Minute Man National Historical Park. 

2. Hanscom Field and the Air Force. 

3. The Port Authority. 

4. Various state boards including the Department 
of Public Works. 

5. Highway planning, including proposed Route 2 
and Route 2-A relocations. 

6. The rising costs of all services including 
education . 

7. The needs of a growing population. 

6 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



No one of these forces is necessarily bad. It is a 
fact that each one exists. The total impact requires 
careful future planning. 

A strong attempt to meet this challenge was made at 
the Annual Town Meeting in 1963 when the Town appropriated 
$4,000 for a land use and financial survey. The $4,000 
would be increased to $12,000 by a Federal grant. Final 
technical approval for this grant is being worked out. 

The work of the survey is already under way. Adams, 
Howard and Opperman have been retained as planning con- 
sultants. A Steering Committee of two selectmen and two 
planning board members has appointed and met with three 
major sub-committees. There is every reason for feeling 
that with the cooperation of the Town and all the boards 
and committees of the Town, analysis of the Town's present 
and future should be most helpful to the inhabitants of 
the Town in giving them all known facts and helping to 
make future decisions more knowledgeable. 

In the meantime, decisions must be made by the Town 
if the position of the Town is not to worsen. It is dif- 
ficult for voters to make decisions when only part of a 
picture is presented. To fill the gap between the time 
when the results of the survey can be presented to the 
Town (possibly a year from now) and the coming Town Meet- 
ing, here is the action that we are taking and the pro- 
posals we shall submit to the Town Meeting for the Town's 
decision . 

ROAD PLANNING 

The Board is working with the National Park, the Air 
Force, the Port Authority, and the Department of Public 
Works to try to resolve planning for Route 2, for Route 
2-A, and possibly for an access road which could connect 
the northwest corner of the Town with the airport and with 
a relocated Route 62. It is important that relations be- 
tween these agencies and the Town be good and that all 
points of view be exchanged and understood. We feel that 
when the location of the new highways can be definite, 
much of the Town's planning can go forward. Through over 1 
all cooperation, we hope to resolve this major problem 
during the coming months. 



SELECTMEN 



LAND ACQUISITION 

The Town Boards have come to realize that it will not 
always be possible for the Town to acquire vacant land 
wherever and whenever the Town needs it. Within 5 to 10 
years, it may be difficult for the Town to acquire land 
for whatever uses may then seem wise and necessary. The 
survey the Town has undertaken will certainly be of assist- 
ance to overall planning. 

An immediate problem, however, concerns land on the 
north side of the present Route 2. Owned by the DiPernas, 
it is up for development. An adjoining area owned by 
Sumner Smith controls the water flow for the DiPerna land. 



The 
Board jo 
acquire 
50 acres 
acres , 
tion and 
of an ar 
por tant 
immed iat 
acquire 
over the 
may be n 

To 

from pas 



Conservation Commission, Planning Board, and this 
in in feeling that it would be wise to attempt to 
all of the DiPerna land, consisting of just under 
, as well as the adjoining land, consisting of 20 

Much of the land can clearly be used for recrea- 

conservat ion , Since this land lies in the center 
ea in which many of our residents live, it is im- 
for the Town to acquire all of the land even though 
e uses may not be evident. If the Town does not 
all of the land, it seems likely that at some time 

coming years, when new needs become clear, there 
o land available in this area, 

acquire land in this way represents a departure 

t thinking. We join in recommending this action. 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Four years ago, the Town took steps to increase the 
efficiency of its operation by hiring an administrative 
officer on a part-time basis. During the last year, this 
office was filled officially for three days a week and un- 
officially for much more of the time. We propose follow- 
ing the plan stated during the last years, that this be- 
come a full-time position by the Town's adoption of the 
statute which provides for an Executive Secretary, 

The statute provides for one who will help administer 
the affairs of the Town, The last four years have clearly 
demonstrated that the efficiency of the Town's services 
and their costs are directly influenced by such action, 
A full-time Executive Secretary will further increase real 
benefits to the Town, 



8 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

In addition, the inhabitants of the Town will clearly 

benefit when there is a full-time administrator on the job 

to help individuals with their problems that relate to the 
Town . 

In the second place, establishing this position would 
leave Town government and Town policy completely in the 
hands of the Town. In this way it differs from the town 
manager approach. Town boards, elected and appointed, 
will continue to maintain full policy-making prerogative. 
The Town will still, properly and wisely, be dependent upon 
its inhabitants and their representatives in office to 
initiate and develop policies and proposals for the Town. 

Other areas which are of concern to this Board are 
set forth in detail below. Sufficient is it to say that 
we shall continue to make every effort to provide adequate 
and efficient services. Lincoln is still a small Town. 
Its inhabitants are entitled to adequate public safety 
facilities, roads, and similar services. We feel that 
present standards probably approximate the type and extent 
of service presently desired. We shall try to continue 
these services at this level with such increased efficien- 
cy as is possible. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Town Hall . The Board will ask for sufficient funds 
this year to finish the exterior repair started in 1961. 
When this work is finished, all major repair to the build- 
ing will be complete. It is gratifying that the Upper 
Hall is used so extensively by the community. 

Pierce House and Park . The Selectmen intend to ex- 
plore with the Landscape and Recreation Committees improve- 
ment of the grounds on the south and east sides of the 
house. A plan was developed for the whole Park in 1931 
which was never implemented. This plan included two 
ponds, which not only would add beauty but which might 
also serve recreation purposes. 

Fire and Police Building . This building is in ex- 
cellent condition, and requires only minimum maintenance. 

Highway Building . Only annual maintenance attention 
is required . 



9 



SELECTMEN 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire. Police. Communications . 

The placing of Fire and Police departments and Com- 
munications under one administrator has proved successful* 
It has allowed better use of personnel, and given the com- 
munity a more sensitive coverage in the total area of pro- 
tection . 

Fire . A review of the Fire Department was completed 
during the year by the New England Fire Insurance Rating 
Association, which will give direction for improving the 
Department in the years ahead. The Town's insurance rat- 
ing was raised from D to C, which drops the cost of in- 
surance (where Town water is available) on private dwell- 
ings by a small percentage. The Board is recommending 
that another full-time man be added, which addition, with 
the night-watch, will give complete twenty-four hour cov- 
erage . 

A forest fire truck of maneuverable size is under 
consideration. It is felt that such a vehicle would get 
into wood roads quickly and give better control at a lower 
payroll cost in handling brush fires. 

We are deeply appreciative of the willingness and 
ability with which the call fire department responds to 
fires and protects the town in frequently difficult and 
dangerous situations. 

Pol ice . In May Richard Hallett was added to the 
force on a regular basis. He has been an excellent addi- 
tion, and will attend the State Police Training School as 
have the other members of the force. This additional reg- 
ular patrolman has cut down the need for "specials" by a 
considerable amount. The regular force consists of a 
Chief, a Deputy Chief, and four permanent Patrolmen, We 
commend this Department for its skill in handling emergen- 
cies and its overall day by day efficient work in behalf 
of the Town. 

Civil Defense . The headquarters for Civil Defense 
were moved during the year to the basement of the Fire and 
Police Station, which now houses all phases of protection. 

Federal and State agencies are constantly pressing 
for more activity in the area of Civil Defense. It is 
the belief of the Board that the Town desires that Civil 
Defense be supported at minimum levels. We are aware of 



10 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

the difficult position of our Director, Ernest Johnson, 
and appreciative of his service in behalf of the Town. 

PARKS - PUBLIC TREES 

The majority of the work in the Parks Department is 
concerned with disease and pest control carried on in 
accordance with State requirements, Cemetery maintenance, 
under the direction of the Cemetery Commissioners, brush 
and ivy control, tree planting, landscaping, etc. It also 
supplements the Highway Department when additional help is 
needed at critical times during the year. 

For two years, a limited number of elms have been 
treated with an inoculant for the control of the Dutch Elm 
disease. None will be treated this year, pending further 
evaluation of this experiment. 

Only limited spraying is contemplated for the coming 
year for control of disease and insects. 

HIGHWAYS 

The following roads have had major construction com- 
pleted during 1963: 



Lexington Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Baker Bridge Road 



Beaver Pond Road 
Ballfield Road 



Minor surfacing and drainage work has been done on 
the following: 



Blueberry Lane 
Nelson Road 
Conant Road 



Smith School parking area 
Old County Road 
Tabor Hill Road 



In 1964 the highway program will include construction 
on the roads listed below: 



Weston Road 
Old Winter Street 
Winter Street 
Sunnyside Lane 



Page Road 
Conant Road 
Old County Road 



Chapter 90 maintenance funds will be used on Bedford 
Road north of Route 2. 

Chapter 90 construction funds will be used on Route 
117 between Tower Road and the Weston line. 



11 



SELECTMEN 

Because of the allocation of State funds to towns 
(Acts of 1962 and 1963, Chapters 782 and 822) for road re- 
pair, the maintenance item in the budget for 1964 has been 
reduced considerably. 

Capital expenditures of the past four years have im- 
proved many of the Town's roads to a point where future 
maintenance can be kept at a minimum. We believe that 
the program for capital improvement of roads is nearly 
completed and that maintenance will be the prime considera- 
tion during the next few years. 

The Department is requesting a replacement truck for 
the 1956 Chevrolet and a general purpose tractor with 
front-end loader and mower for use in both the Highway and 
Parks Departments. 

SALUTAMUS 

It is only fitting that we acknowledge the important 
and able assistance given to the Board by those that work 
with it. Many in the Town know and recognize Elizabeth 
Causer's experienced, competent and free help in many areas. 
The staff at the Town Hall cheerfully helps to make many 
otherwise complicated tasks move smoothly. 

We are also grateful to the department heads whose 
direction and supervision helped to increase the efficien- 
cy of Town service. And particularly at this time of year 
are we all aware of the importance to the Town of the good 
work that is done in maintaining the roads and keeping them 
safe in times of snow and ice. 

Retiring from active service are George G. Tarbell, 
Jr., who has given many years of service on the Board of 
Assessors; Constantin A. Pertzof f , who devotedly served 
five years on the Planning Board; and John Quincy Adams, 
who resigned as President of the Directors of DeCordova 
and Dana Museum and Park, after many years of dedicated 
service. 



We close this report on a note of combined sorrow and 
gratitude for those who have served and are no longer with 

us . 

Matthew H. Doherty, an esteemed senior citizen, who 
served the Town as Fire Chief for many years, died during 
1963 . 



12 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Robert D. Donaldson, Sr, devotedly served the Town 
for many years as a member of the Board of Selectmen and 
the Board of Health. 

Charles Kimball Fitts served Lincoln and its inhabi- 
tants in many ways. We are particularly aware of all that 
he did as Chairman of this Board for eight years. It is 
hardly possible to realize the extent of time and pre- 
occupation he dedicated to the Town and its people. An 
able administrator and a planner with vision, he has left 
the Town far richer in the important intangibles that make 
Lincoln what it is. 

Warren F. Flint 
Elliott V. Grabill 

Selectmen of Lincoln 



13 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Term Expires 
MODERATOR 
Charles Y. Wadsworth 1964 

TOWN CLERK 
William H. Davis 1964 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Charles K. Fitts, Chairman (deceased) .... 1965 

Warren F. Flint 1964 

Elliott V. Grabill 1966 

ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman ... 1966 

Elmer H. Ziegler 1965 

George G. Tarbell, Jr 1964 

TREASURER 
Frederick B. Taylor 1964 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
William H. Davis 1965 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Perry J. Culver, M. D., Chairman J.964 

C. DeWitt Smith 1965 

Helen B. Gilfoy 1966 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Russell P. Mahan, Chairman 1964 

Alan McClennen 19-65 

Stuart Avery 1966 

TREE WARDEN 
Albert S. Brooks 1964 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D. , Chairman .... 1964 

Pierre Dreyfus, M. D. 1965 

Abigail Avery 1966 



14 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Term Expires 
REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ellen DeN. Cannon, Chairman 1966 

Henry Morgan 1964 

James Jagger . 1965 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Robert A. Spence, Chairman . 1966 

James DeNormandie 1965 

H. Arnold MacLean 1964 

PLANNING BOARD 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman .... 1965 

Edith M. Henderson, Vice-Chairman 1966 

Constantin A. Pertzoff ..... 1964 

Warren R. Dwyer 1967 

David L. Garrison 1968 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Albert S. Brooks 1964 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell 1964 

Richard F. Schroeder 1965 

William T. King 1966 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Thomas Winship, Chairman .... 1964 

Margaret Wood 1965 

Paul Brooks 1966 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Life Trustees 

Edwin M. Cole 

Roland C. Mackenzie 

Alice G. Meriam 

John Carley, Chairman (elected) 1965 

Morley M. John (appointed by /joint School 

Committees) . 1964 

Leo A. Palmer (Appointed by Selectmen) .... 1966 



15 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Term Expires 
DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK ' 
A Director s 

Dana W. Atchley, Jr., President 1966 

John Quincy Adams (resigned) 1964 

Victor A. Lutnicki (appointed) 1964 

Paul W. Cook, Jr 1966 

John W. Lincoln 1965 

B Director s 

Eliot Hubbard (appointed by the Selectmen) . . 1966 

Stanley Heck (appointed by Library Trustees) . 1964 

Janet Daniels (appointed by School Committee). 1965 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT AND CLERK OF SELECTMEN 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1964 

EXECUTIVE OFFICER 
Warren F. Flint 1964 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1964 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Raymond P. Maher 1964 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Leo J. Algeo 1964 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1964 

FIRE CHIEF 
Leo J. Algeo 1964 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1964 

Frank W. Gordon, Jr. 1964 

Michael McHugh 1964 

Richard J. Hallett 1964 

CONSTABLES 

Leo J. Algeo 1964 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1964 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1964 



16 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Expires 
DOG OFFICERS 

Leo J. Algeo 1964 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1964 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1964 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Thomas W. Coan 1964 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 
Albert S. Brooks 1964 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 
Thomas W. Coan 1964 

FOREST WARDEN 
Leo J. Algeo 1964 

BUILDING INSPECTOR AND WIRING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1964 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTOR 
Daniel J. Murphy 1964 

SPECIAL POLICE 

John T. Algeo Mary D. Hayes (Traffic) 

Robert H. Booth Ernest L. Johnson 

Floriy Campobasso William T. King 

Joseph Campobasso Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 

Edward C. Chisholm Harry B. Knowles, III 

Claire Ciraso (Traffic) Karl F. Lahnstein 

E. John Ciraso Paul V. Moynihan 

Harry Cook Mary B. Murphy (Matron) 

John F. Cook E. Donlan Rooney 

Joseph Cotoni D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 

William Dean Carl Smith 

James DeNormandie Francis J. Smith 

William R. Doherty Sumner Smith 

Lloyd A. Douty Alanson H. Sturgis 

Charles K. Fitts David Todd 

Warren F. Flint Mary J. Gilbert (Matron) 

John T. Gilbert Henry Warner 

Elliott V. Grabill William Whalen 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Ernest L. Johnson 1964 



17 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Term Expires 
ASSISTANT DIRECTORS OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Eveleth R. Todd 1964 

Thomas W. Coan 1964 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Delbar P. Keily . . . e 1964 

FENCE VIEWERS 

Richard J. Eaton 1964 

Guilbert Winchell 1964 

SURVEYOR OF CORD WOOD 

Albert S. Brooks 1964 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Ruth M. Burk 1964 

Mary Jane Butler 1964 

John W. Fisher 1964 

Walter I. Keyes 1964 

Charles E. Jennings . 1964 

Albert E. Nelson 1964 

Nancy K. Outten - 1964 

Joan A. Ogden 1964 

Fred P. Walkey 1964 

Arlene B. Wirsig 1964 

J. Bertram Kessel, Chairman 1964 

VETERANS 1 AGENT 

William B. Whalen 1964 

LANDSCAPE COMMITTEE 

Albert S. Brooks 1964 

Elizabeth H. Doherty 1964 

Richard J. Eaton 1964 

David L. Garrison 1964 

Mabel H. Todd 1964 

Max Mason, Chairman 1964 

TOWN COUNSEL 

John W. White 1964 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Harriet Rogers (resigned) • 1964 

Margaret Flint (appointed) 1964 



18 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Expires 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams 1964 

Paul Brooks 1964 

Mary Drury 1964 

John B. French 1964 

James DeNormandie 1964 

Robert Lemire 1964 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

William N. Swift, Chairman 1966 

Alan McClennen 1967 

Henry B. Hoover 1968 

James Jagger 1964 

Hans Van Leer 1965 

Associate Members 

J. Lewis Cunningham 1964 

Betty L. Lang 1965 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Lawrence B. Anderson 1966 

Stephen W. Herthel 1965 

William A. Halsey 1964 

Associate Member 

Walter E. Belanger 1964 

BUILDING CODE STUDY COMMITTEE 

William A. Halsey 1964 

Douglas M. Burckett 1964 

Harold Rosenwald 1964 

Stanley D. Porter 1964 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 1966 

Manley B. Boyce 1964 

Henry Morgan 1965 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk, ex officio . . . 1964 

COMMUNITY COUNCIL AT HANSCOM FIELD 

Albert England, M. D. 1964 

William M. Rand, Jr 1964 

Raymond W. Tunnell 1964 



19 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



JURY LIST. 19 6 3 

Name Res id ence Occupat ion 

Robert L. Allen Codman Road Public Relations 

Robert L. Bradford Cedar Road Executive 

William B. Butler Mackintosh Lane Store Manager 

Ellen DeN. Cannon Weston Road Housewife 

Charles B. Comstock Cambridge Turnpike Indus. Research 

Saville Davis Winter Street Editor 

Robert Donaldson Trapelo Road Banking 

Henry W. Edgell Conant Road Personnel Manager 

Lucius W. Evans Lexington Road Shoe Manufacturer 

Anthony Faunce Sandy Pond Road Insurance 

Gertrude W. Fitts Weston Road Housewife 

Donald A. Gilfoy Grasshopper Lane Executive 

Ranulf W. Gras Laurel Drive Engineer 

Robert W. Gray Lincoln Road Mfr*s Agent 

George G. Haworth Giles Road Treasurer 

Stanley Heck Bedford Road Purchasing Agent 

Elliott R. Hedge Old Concord Road Banker 

Roy S. Kingsbury Mackintosh Lane Consultant 

John D. Kling Farrar Road Engineer 

Gregory Kolligian Fox Run Road Automobile Bus. 

Richard E. Lang Bedford Road Engineer 

Alan McClennen Silver Hill Road Planner 

George C. McMurtry Sandy Pond Road Officer Manager 

James Meyer Laurel Drive Physicist 

Persis Murphy Beaver Pond Road Housewife 

Elliott F. Page Beaver Pond Road Engineer 

Anthony P. Pickman Concord Road Executive 

William D. Rodrick Morningside Lane Plant Engineer 

David F. Rogers North Great Road Salesman 

William A. Scanlan Old Cambridge Tpke. Salesman 

John Stevenson Weston Road Business Research 

Vincent Tarky Huckleberry Hill Manufacturer 

C. Lee Todd Lincoln Road Stock Broker 

William G. Williams Old Sudbury Road Banking 

Guilbert S. Winchell Oxbow Road Engineer 



Appointed July, 1963 William H. Davis, 

Town Clerk 



20 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

Term Expires 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 
Ann E. Paddock 1964 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

COMMUNITY NURSE 
Alice E. Garrison, R. N 1964 

BURIAL AGENT 
William H. Davis 1964 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
George U. Browning, Jr. 1964 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 

TOWN BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Guilbert S. Winchell 1964 

Winthrop B. Walker 1965 

Eleanor Wilson 1966 

E. Karl Bastress 1967 

John Pike 1968 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Ernest P. Neumann 1964 

Paul L. Norton, M. D 1965 

George H. Kidder (resigned) 1966 

Joseph A. Vitale 1966 

Richard B. Bailey (appointed) 1966 

John B. Tew, Chairman 1965 

LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

Russell L. Haden, Jr., Chairman 1965 

Richard C. B. Clark, Secretary 1964 

Robert D. Donaldson, Jr 1966 



21 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Term Expires 
MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

James DeNormandie 1964 

Metro Fedock 1964 

Charles M. Styron 1964 

Barbara K. Warner 1964 

Alfred D. Weiss 1964 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 

Julie Courtney 1964 

William R. Doherty 1964 

Annette E. Gras 1964 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1964 

E. Donlan Rooney 1964 

SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 

Winthrop B. Walker 1964 

Donald J. Natoli 1964 

Malcolm L. Donaldson 1964 

Sec or D. Browne 1964 

Eleanor Wilson 1964 

HARTWELL SCHOOL ADDITION COMMITTEE 

William N. Swift 1964 

Helen Gilfoy 1964 

Eugene Mellish 1964 

Gerard Henderson 1964 

INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 

Eleanor Wilson 1964 

Ann S. Monks 1964 

Saville R. Davis 1964 

RECREATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Gardner Jackson, Jr. 1964 

J. Bertram Kessel 1964 

Robert A. Lemire 1964 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1964 

Albert E. Nelson 1964 

David Webster 1964 

Lucy J. Young 1964 



22 



TOWN CLERK 



William H. Davis 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town 
events and activities and issues licenses and certifi- 
cates. His duties include recording the proceedings at 
Town Meetings and Elections, and notifying the Selectmen 
and other officers concerned of appropriations which have 
been voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept at 
the Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in 
the Town should communicate with the clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 18, 1963 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Charles Y. Wadsworth 
The return of the Warrant was read and the invocation was 
given by Reverned Father James J. McDevitt. The Modera- 
tor then called attention to Article 1 (Election of Offi- 
cers) and, a quorum being present, the following business 
was transacted: 

Article 2 . To bring in their votes for any com- 
mittees, commissioners, trustees, and other officers re- 
quired by law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : That Albert Brooks be elected Measurer 
of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Commissioners, Committees and Trustees. 

VOTED : That the reports of the Town Officers, 
Commissioners, Committees and Trustees, as printed in the 
Town Report, be accepted, and the reports of the following 
committees be accepted as interim reports; and that the 
committees and their unexpended appropriations be contin- 
ued: Hartwell School Addition Committee, School Needs 
Committee . 

Article 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of 
the several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board, or Committee shall be auth- 
orized to employ for additional compensation any of its 

23 



TOWN MEETINGS 



members and to fix additional compensation of such mem- 
ber s . 

VOTED : That the salaries of the elected offi- 
cers of the Town for the current year be fixed at the fol- 
lowing amounts respectively: 

Selectmen, each $ 100.00 

Treasurer 200.00 

Collector of Taxes 2,950.00 

Town Clerk 600.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Tree Warden 200.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to employ 
one of their members at a rate of $35.45 per diem; that 
the Tree Warden be authorized to work for the Park Depart- 
ment at a rate of $2.75 per hour, and that the Board of 
Assessors be authorized to employ one or more of their 
members at a rate of $25.00 per diem. 

Article 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That consideration of this matter be 
postponed until an adjourned meeting be held at 7:30 P.M. 
Monday, April 15, 1963, in this hall, and that in the 
meanwhile this matter be referred to the finance committee 
with directions to reduce the budget by an aggregate amount 
of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00), the reduction 
to be made in such items as the finance committee may de- 
termine . 

Article 6 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue of the financial year beginning Janu- 
ary 1, 1964, and to issue a note or notes therefor payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year, in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

VOTED : That the Town Treasurer, with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of revenue of the finan- 
cial year beginning January 1, 1964, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year, in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, Gen- 
eral Laws . 



24 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Ar t i c 1 e 7 , To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of the 
Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting of March 16, 
1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $20,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund 
established pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 
23 of the Annual Meeting of March 16, 1959. 

Ar t i c 1 e 8 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of the 
Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 
1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $10,000.00 to be added to the Stabilization Fund 
established pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 
23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959. 

Art icle 9 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to conduct services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, 
appoint a committee, raise and appropriate the sum of 
$250.00, or any other sum, or take any action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED : That the Moderator be authorized to 
appoint a committee of five to plan and carry out exercises 
on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May next, and that the 
Town raise and appropriate the sum of $250.00 for the use 
of such committee in connection with the exercises. 

Article 10 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to celebrate the Fourth of July, appoint a committee, 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, or any other 
sum, or take any action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Moderator be authorized to 
appoint a committee of five to plan and carry out a cele- 
bration for Independence Day, the fourth of July, and that 
the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to be 
used by the Committee, together with $250.00 from the 
Donald Gordon Fund. 

Article 11 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to request the Trustees under the will of Julian DeCordova 
to pay over to the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park one 
hundred per cent (100%) of the B Trust net income for the 
year 1963, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town request the Trustees under 
the will of Julian DeCordova to pay over to the DeCordova 



25 



TOWN MEETINGS 



and Dana Museum and Park one hundred per cent (100%) of 
the B Trust net income for the year 1963. 

(At this point Mr. Elliott V. Grabill spoke of the 
many years of service Mr. John Quincy Adams, president of 
the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park corporation, who 
announced his retirement from the Board, had given the 
Town. Whereupon the entire audience rose with prolonged 
applause . ) 

Ar t i c 1 e 12. To determine whether the Town will auth- 
orize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to 
continue its annual contract with the U. S. Commissioner 
of Education to operate the elementary school at L. G. 
Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

VOTED : That the Town will authorize the Board 
of Selectmen and the School Committee to continue its 
annual contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education 
to operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, 
Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Ar t i c 1 e 13 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, or any other 
sum, for the purchase of a police cruiser to replace exist- 
ing equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,500.00 for the purpose of purchasing and equip- 
ping a police cruiser to replace existing equipment. 

Ar ticle 14 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 for permanent improve- 
ments in the Cemeteries, said sum to be taken from the 
Cemetery Investment Fund, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$2,000.00 for permanent improvements in the Cemeteries, 
said sum to be taken from the Cemetery Investment Fund. 

Ar ticle 15 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00, or any other 
sum, to make necessary repairs to the outside of the Town 
Hall, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $5,000.00 to make necessary repairs to the outside 
of the Town Hall. 

Ar ticle 16 . To determine whether the Town will vote 

to convey to Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, et als, Trustees, 

four parcels of land and buildings thereon, constituting 

what is known as the South School, on Lincoln Road, Lin- 



26 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



coin, Massachusetts, said parcels being described in three 
deeds from Ogden Codman to the inhabitants of the Town of 
Lincoln, recorded in the Middlesex South District Registry 
of Deeds in Book 1927, at Pages 534 to 537, and Book 2207, 
at Page 358; or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and hereby are 
authorized on behalf of the Town to convey in fee for such 
consideration as they, in their discretion, deem adequate, 
the land and buildings thereon, constituting what is known 
as the South School, on Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Massachu- 
setts, to Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, et als, Trustees, said 
land consisting of four parcels as follows: 

Pare el ft 1 , containing one acre, according to and 
as described in deed from Ogden Codman to the inhabitants 
of the Town of Lincoln, dated August 14th, 1889, recorded 
in Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 1927, at Pages 534 
and 5 35 ; 

Parcel ft 2 . containing approximately 80 square rods, 
according to and as described in a second deed from Ogden 
Codman to the inhabitants of the Town of Lincoln, dated 
August 14th, 1889, recorded in said Deeds, Book 1927, at 
Pages 536 and 537; 

Par eel ft 3 , containing 5,431.5 square feet, and 
Par eel ft 4 . containing 2,722.5 square feet, both according 
to and as described in one deed from Ogden Codman to the 
inhabitants of the Town of Lincoln, dated June 27th, 1893, 
recorded in said Deeds, Book 2207, at Pages 385 and 386; 

The School Committee of the Town of Lincoln having 
notified the Selectmen that said land and buildings are 
and for over one year have not been used or needed for 
school purposes. 

Art icle 17 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to amend the Zoning Map of Lincoln, Massachusetts, dated 
February 2nd, 1953, as heretofore amended, to include with- 
in the B-2 Service Business District certain parcels of lani 
located on the northwest side of Lincoln Road and west of 
the right of way of the Boston & Maine Railroad, shown as 
B-l to B-2, and R-l to B-2, on a plan entitled "Proposed 
Zoning Changes - Plan C" , prepared by Cleverdon, Varney & 
Pike, and dated February, 1963; and to include within the 
R-l District a parcel of land shown as B-l to R-l on said 
plan entitled "Proposed Zoning Changes - Plan C" , or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (331 for; 14 against) That the Zoning 
Map of the Town of Lincoln dated February 2nd, 1953, as 
heretofore amended, be, and it hereby is, further amended 
as follows: (1) To include within the B-2 Service Busi- 
ness District established under Section V-B-2, of the 

27 



Zoning By-Law of t 
on the northwest s 
ton & Maine Railro 
on a plan entitled 
pared by Cleverdon 
and heretofore pub 
the R-l Single Fam 
Section V-A-l of s 
similarly located 
titled "Proposed Z 



TOWN MEETINGS 

he Town certain parcels of land located 
ide of Lincoln Road and west of the Bos- 
ad, shown as B-l to B-2 and R-l to B-2 

"Proposed Zoning Changes - Plan C" , pre 
, Varney & Pike, dated February, 1963, 
lished and posted; and to include within 
ily Residence District established under 
aid Zoning By-Law that parcel of land 
and shown as B-l to R-l on said plan en- 
oning Changes - Plan C" . 



FINAL REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

OF THE TOWN OF LINCOLN 

TO THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 18, 1963 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A, 
Section 6 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts, the Planning Board presents herewith its final 
report to the Annual Town Meeting on its proposal to amend 
the zoning map of Lincoln, Massachusetts, dated February 2, 
1953, and thereafter amended, to extend the B-2 Service 
Business District by including certain parcels of land with- 
in the B-2 Service Business District established in Section 
V-B-2 of the Zoning By-Law of the Town, and also to include 
certain parcels of land within the R-l Single Residence 
District established in Section V-A-l of the Zoning By-Law 
of the Town. These parcels of land are shown as Parcels 
B-l to B-2, R-l to B-2, and B-l to R-l on a plan entitled 
"Proposed Zoning Changes, Plan C, South Lincoln", prepared 
by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike for the Lincoln Planning Board, 
dated February, 1963, copies of this plan having been post- 
ed in the Town and published in advertisement of the stat- 
utory public hearing on the proposed amendments which was 
held at the Town Hall on March 15, 1963. No material 
changes to the amendments were made at this time. The 
Planning Board strongly recommends the rezoning of these 
parcels in furtherance of a long range plan for the area, 
the purpose of which is to unify the B-l Retail District, 
and to separate the Retail and Service Business areas. 
This proposed extension of the B-2 Service Business Dis- 
trict will provide an appropriate amount of additional 
land for Service Business use to meet the needs of the 
Town . 

The Board further recommends the rezoning of the par- 
cel entitled B-l to R-l so that this parcel, which lies 
within rights-of-way for highway purposes, will conform 
with Section 11, D, 1, of the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Lincoln which reads "Where boundary lines are shown upon 
said map within the side lines of public and private ways, 






28 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

the center lines of such ways shall be the boundary lines." 

The Planning Board unanimously recommends the adoption 
of these proposed zoning map changes. 

Edith M. Henderson Constantin A. Pertzoff 
Warren R. Dwyer Paul Brooks 

R. Langdon Wales 

Lincoln Planning Board 

Ar ticle 18 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to acquire in fee for municipal road purposes by eminent 
domain, purchase, or any other way, two parcels of land 
now or formerly of Thomas N. Codman, et als, Trustees, and 
shown as Parcels One and Three on a plan entitled "Plan of 
Lewis Street Layout", prepared by Cleverdon, Varney & Pike, 
and dated January, 1963, and to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $5,700.00, or any other sum, therefor, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (For 275; against 19) That the Select- 
men be, and they hereby are, authorized in the name and on 
behalf of the Town to acquire in fee, by purchase, eminent 
domain, or any other way, for highway and municipal park- 
ing purposes, subject to such restrictions as they in their 
discretion deem appropriate, two parcels of land now or 
formerly belonging to Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, et als, 
Trustees, being shown as Parcels 1 and 3 on a plan en- 
titled "Plan of Lewis Street Layout", prepared by Clever- 
don, Varney & Pike, dated January, 1963, and bounded and 
described as follows: 

a) Beginning at a point on the northerly side of 
Lincoln Road, which is the northwest corner of the inter- 
section formed by Lincoln Road and the Boston &, Maine Rail- 
road, and thence running N. 28° 34* 01" W., a distance of 
two hundred forty-four and fifteen hundredths (244.15) feet 
to a point; thence running S. 50° 50* 00" W., a distance 

of fifty and eighty-seven hundredths (50.87) feet to a 
point; thence turning and running S. 28° 34' 02" E., a dis- 
tance of two hundred twenty-seven and fifty-four hundredths 
(227.54) feet to a point; thence turning and running 
N. 70° 00* 30" E., a distance of twenty-seven and fifty- 
seven hundredths (27.57) feet to a point; thence running 
along a curve with a radius of nine hundred forty-five and 
seventy-six hundredths (945.76) feet, northeasterly to a 
distance of twenty-two and ninety-seven hundredths (22.97) 
feet, to the point of beginning; containing 11,798.19 squar 
feet, more or less; and 

b) Beginning at a point on the southerly side of 
the proposed new Lincoln Road, which lies three hundred 
sixteen and sixty-two hundredths (316.62) feet southwester- 

29 



TOWN MEETINGS 



ly from the southwest corner of an intersection formed by 
the proposed new Lincoln Road and the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road, thence running along a curve with a radius of fifty 
(50.00) feet southerly and southeasterly a distance of one 
hundred and twenty hundredths (100.20) feet to a point; 
thence running along a curve with a radius of one hundred 
eighty-two and fifty-eight hundredths (182.58) feet south- 
easterly a distance of one hundred forty-six and fifty- 
eight hundredths (146.58) feet to a point; thence turning 
and running S. 70° 00' 30" W., a distance of one hundred 
fifty-three and seventy-nine hundredths (153.79) feet to a 
point; thence running along a curve with a radius of seven- 
ty-nine and sixty-five hundredths (79.65) feet northwester- 
ly a distance of one hundred and fifty-four hundredths 
(100.54) feet to a point; thence running along a curve with 
a radius of forty (40.00) feet and northeasterly a dis- 
tance of sixty-one and seventy-nine hundredths (61.79) feet 
to a point; thence running N. 50° 50* 00*' E., a distance 
of ninety-eight and thirty-eight hundredths (98.38) feet 
to the point of beginning; containing 11,623.73 square 
feet, more or less; 

and for said purposes to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $5,700.00 therefor. 

Ar t i c 1 e 19 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to accept as a public way the private way known as Twin 
Pond Lane, as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision of 
Land in Lincoln, owned by Olga Pertzof f" , drawn by McCarthy 
Engineering Service, Inc., and dated May 6, 1958. Said 
plan was approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lin- 
coln on June 17, 1958, and recorded with the Middlesex 
Registry of Deeds on December 12, 1958, as Plan #1643 of 
1958. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a public way the 
private way known as Twin Pond Lane, as shown on a plan en- 
titled "Subdivision of Land in Lincoln, owned by Olga Pert- 
zof f", drawn by McCarthy Engineering Service, Inc., and 
dated May 6, 1958, recorded with the Middlesex Registry of 
Deeds December 12, 1958, Plan #1643 of 1958. 

Ar t i c 1 e 20 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to amend the Town By-Laws for the purpose of establishing 
a permanent Building Committee of the Town, to consist of 
five members, one to be appointed by the Selectmen for four 
years, one to be appointed by the School Committee for two 
years, and three to be appointed by the Moderator, one for 
five years, one for three years, and one for one year, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town amend its By-Laws by add- 
ing a new section 9 under Article XI, as follows: 

30 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



There shall be a permanent Committee known as the 
Town Building Committee, to consist of five members, the 
term of office of one of whom shall expire each year. 
Initially one member shall be appointed by the Selectmen 
for four years, one shall be appointed by the School Com- 
mittee for two years, and three shall be appointed by the 
Moderator: one for five years, one for three years, and 
one for one year. Thereafter, as each term expires, a 
successor shall be appointed for a five-year term by the 
authority making the initial appointment. 

Art icle 21 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to amend its General By-Laws so that a quorum of not less 
than four hundred (400) registered voters must be present 
at any Town Meeting at the time it is proposed to acquire 
private property by eminent domain, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : The motion was lost, as was also a 
motion to reduce the figure from 400 to 300. The pro- 
posed motion was as follows: 

To amend Section 5 of Article 11 of the General By- 
Laws of the Town by inserting after the words "shall be 
400" and before the words "this section" the following: 
"and provided also that at the time of voting on a quest- 
ion of whether or not to acquire private property by emi- 
nent domain, without the owner's consent, the number of 
voters constituting a quorum shall be 400", so that Section 
5 shall read as follows: 

"The number of voters necessary to constitute a quo- 
rum at any Town Meeting shall be 100, provided, however, 
that a number less than 100 may from time to time adjourn 
the same, and provided that at the time of voting on a 
question of whether or not to amend the Zoning Map of the 
Town or any part thereof to permit uses referred to under 
Section V-B-3 of the Zoning By-Law adopted December, 1960, 
the number of voters constituting a quorum shall be 400; 
and provided also that at the time of voting on a question 
of whether or not to acquire private property by eminent 
domain without the owner's consent the number of voters 
constituting a quorum shall be 400. This section shall 
not apply to such parts of meetings as are devoted to the 
election of Town Officers." 

Art icle 22 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,550.00, or some 
other sum, to be added to the Stabilization Fund estab- 
lished pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 23 
of the 1959 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action 



31 



TOWN MEETINGS 



relative thereto. 

VOTED : That there be raised and appropriate 
addition to the Stabilization Fund established pursuan 
the vote of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual To 
Meeting of March 16, 1959, for long-range land acquisi 
the sum of $4,550.00. 






d for 
t to 

wn 

t ion , 



Ar t i c 1 e 2 3 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,550.00, or some 
other sum, to be added to the Conservation Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 
1961 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : That there be raised and appropriated 
the sum of $4,550.00 to be added to the Conservation Fund 
established pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 
13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting. 

Ar ticle 24 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to acquire for conservation and recreational purposes by 
eminent domain, purchase, or in any other way, from Joseph 
and Mira C. Garland, a certain parcel of land on Sandy Pond 
Road, shown as Lot 3 on a plan entitled "Division of Land 
in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned by Joseph and Mira C. Gar- 
land**, recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 9955, Page 511, said parcel having an area 
of 3.2 acres, more or less, and for such purposes to ex- 
pend from monies in the Conservation Fund established pur- 
suant to the vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 1961 
Annual Town Meeting the sum of $4,000.00, or some other sum 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be authorized and em- 
powered in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire 
in fee by purchase, eminent domain, or in any other manner, 
for conservation and recreational purposes, a certain par- 
cel of land on Sandy Pond Road belonging to Joseph and Mira 
C. Garland, shown as Lot 3 on a plan entitled "Division of 
Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned by Joseph and Mira 
C. Garland", recorded with Middlesex South District Regis- 
try of Deeds in Book 9955, Page 511, said parcel having an 
area of 3.2 acres, more or less, and for such purposes to 
expend from monies in the Conservation Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 
1961 Annual Town Meeting the sum of $4,000.00. 

It was then voted (yes, 144; no, 32) to postpone the 
remainder of the Meeting until April 15th, 1963, at 7:30 
P. M. in this Hall. Meeting adjourned at 11:40 P.M. 






William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



32 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 23, 1963 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant, the 
Polls were declared open by the Warden, D. Everett Sherman, 
Jr. Previously the ballot box had been inspected and 
the following Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Margaret M. Algeo, 
Sadie J. Sherman, and Catherine M. Coan. The duties of 
Warden were taken over by Richard J. Eaton until 12 Noon, 
at which time D. Everett Sherman, Jr. again assumed the 
duties and closed the Polls at 7 o'clock P. M. Ballot 
Clerks assisting in the counting were: Rebecca Gilbert, 
Thelma Haworth, Mary Murphy, Ann Lyons, Phebe Tonseth, 
Jane Telling, Inger Richardson, Barbara O'Brien, George 
Gilbert, Reed K. Taylor, Henry Morgan, and Armand Ferro. 
The total vote cast was 593, with the following results: 



Moderator (3 years) 



Charles Y. Wadsworth 
Bl anks 



557 
36 



Town Clerk (1 year) 



William H. Davis 
Bl anks 



573 
20 



Selectman (3 years) 



Elliott V. Grabill 
Scatter ing 
Bl anks 



521 

1 

71 



Assessor (3 years) 



Douglas M. Burckett 
Bl anks 



543 
50 



Treasurer (1 year) 



Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 



552 
41 



School Committee 
( 3 years ) 

Regional District 
School Committee 
( 3 years ) 

Regional District 
School Committee 
(1 year) 

Water Commissioner 
( 3 years ) 

Tree Warden (1 year) 



Helen B. Gilfoy 
Scatter ing 
Blanks 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Scatter ing 
Blanks 

Henry Morgan 
Blanks 



Stuart B. Avery, Jr 
Blanks 

Albert S. Brooks 
Blanks 



534 

1 
58 

529 

1 
63 

542 
51 



548 
45 

556 
37 



33 



TOWN MEETINGS 






Board of Health 
( 3 years ) 

Cemetery Commissioner 
( 3 years ) 

Planning Board 
( 5 years ) 



Abigail D. Avery 
Blanks 

Robert A. Spence 
Blanks 

David L. Garrison 
John P. Stevenson 
Scatter ing 
Blanks 



546 
47 

541 
52 

436 

150 

2 

5 






Commissioner of 
Trust Funds 
( 3 years ) 

Trustee of Bemis 
Funds ( 3 years ) 

Director of DeCordova 
Museum (4 years) 



William T. King 
Blanks 



Paul Brooks 
Blanks 

Paul W. Cook, Jr. 
Blanks 



544 
49 



549 
44 

541 
53 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL MEETING 
April 15, 1963 

The Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. 

Charles Y. Wadsworth at 7:35 o'clock P. M. The adopted 

motion to adjourn to the above date was read, and the fol- 
lowing transactions enacted: 



Ar t i c 1 e 5 . To raise and 
necessary and expedient purpose 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Mode 
seven to study the whole recrea 
back at the next Annual Town Me 



Original moti 

vote of the Mee 

That the item 

That the Town 



VOTED : 
be withdrawn by 

VOTED : 
adop ted ; 

VOTED : 

priations the listed recommenda 
tached to the Report of the Fin 
printed on pages 4 to 10 inclus 
of the 1962 Town Report, except 
ceded by items specifically lis 
ment to the Financial Section o 



appropriate money for the 
s of the Town, or take any 

rator appoint a committee of 

tion program and report 

eting; 

on of the Finance Committee 

ting; 

s not being held out be 

adopt as separate appro- 
tions in the Schedule at- 
ance Committee for 1962, 
ive of the Financial Section 

where these items are super 
ted in the corrected supple- 
f the 1962 Town Report, and 



34 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



that all the same be raised by taxation except to the fol- 
lowing extent : 

(a) As to items 15, 40, 320, 321, 520, 805, and 
806, respecting which said Schedule contains notations for 
the application of funds thereto from specific sources, 
funds from such sources shall be so applied; 

(b) As to item 502 (Education - Instruction), there 
shall be applied the balance sheet items of Trust Fund In- 
come, entitled as follows: Julian DeCordova School Equip- 
ment Fund - $1,041.55; Grammar School Fund - $44.01; 

(c) Items 950 to 956 inclusive shall be taken from 
Water Department Receipts to the extent available, and to 
the extent insufficient shall be taken from Water Depart- 
ment Surplus . 



Art i c 1 e 25 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to amend the Zoning Map of Lincoln, Mass., dated February 
2, 1953, as heretofore amended, to include within the C- 
Open-Space Conservation District of the Town under the 
Town's Zoning By-Law a certain parcel of land lying south 
and west of Conant Road, now or formerly of Ranulf W. Gras, 
Morton B. Braun, and Richard S. Morgan, Trustees of the 
Valley Pond Realty Trust, or take any other action relative 
ther et o . 

VOTED : That the Zoning Map of the Town of Lin- 
coln, dated February 2, 1953, as heretofore amended, be 
further amended to include within the C-Open-Space Conser- 
vation District established under Section V-C of the Zon- 
ing By-Law of the Town a parcel of land on the westerly 
side of Conant Road, being a portion of property owned now 
or formerly by Ranulf W. Gras, Richard S. Morgan, and Mort- 
on Braun, as they are Trustees of the Valley Pond Realty 
Trust, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a drill hole in a stone wall at the 
northwesterly corner of Lot 1 of the Valley Pond Realty 
Trust, as shown on a "Plan showing Division of Land of 
Valley Pond Realty Trust (formerly of Louis W. Dean) in 
Lincoln and Weston, Mass.", dated July 17, 1961, by Snelling, 
Hilton &, Associates, Civil Engineers & Land Surveyors, and 
recorded with South Middlesex District Deeds, as plan # 
1121 Q of 1961, in Book 9863, Page 161; thence running 
S. 46* 35" E. , four hundred three and fourteen hun- 
dredths (403.14) feet by Lot 1, as shown on said plan; 
thence turning and running S. 9° 40 f 30" W. , two hundred 
sixty-one and seventy-five hundredths (261.75) feet by Lot 
2, as shown on said plan; thence turning and running S. 1 
18* 10" W., one hundred seventy and seventy-five hundredths 
(170.75) feet by Lot 3, as shown on said plan to the Weston- 



35 



re 



TOWN MEETINGS 

Lincoln boundary line, as shown on said plan; thence run- 
ning in a northwesterly direction along the Weston-Lincoln 
line a distance of approximately three hundred (300) feet 
to a point which is ten (10) feet northwesterly of a con- 
tour line showing an elevation of one hundred seventy (170) 
feet above mean sea level datum; thence following a line a 
distance of ten (10) feet from said contour line in a gen- 
eral northerly, westerly, and southerly direction a dis- 
tance of approximately one thousand three hundred (1300) 
feet to a point where said line intersects the said Weston- 
Lincoln boundary line; thence turning and running along 
said boundary line in a northeasterly direction approxi- 
mately one hundred forty-five (145) feet to a point; thence 
turning in a generally westerly direction along said Weston 
Lincoln boundary line, approximately one hundred forty-five 
(145) feet to a point; thence turning and running in a 
generally northerly direction along a dam on a line at a 
distance of ten (10) feet from a contour line showing an 
elevation of one hundred seventy (170) feet above mean sea 
level datum, a distance of approximately sixty (60) feet 
to a point on said dam; thence turning and running along 
said dam in a northwesterly direction on a line at a dis- 
tance of ten (10) feet southerly from a contour line show- 
ing an elevation of one hundred seventy (170) feet above 
sea level datum, a distance of approximately four hundred 
fifty (450) feet to a point; thence continuing in said 
northwesterly direction a distance of approximately thirty 
(30) feet to a point; thence turning and running in a north- 
easterly direction at a distance of ten (10) feet from a 
contour line showing an elevation of one hundred seventy 
(170) feet above mean sea level datum at a distance of 
approximately five hundred seventy (570) feet to a point 
on a stone wall; thence turning and running southeasterly 
along said stone wall to the northwesterly corner of Lot 
14 on "Plan showing Subdivision of Land in Lincoln, Mass., 
owned by Prescott L. Davis* 1 , dated August 14, 1961, by 
Snelling, Hilton & Associates, Civil Engineers &, Land Sur- 
veyors, recorded with said Deeds as Plan #136A of 1962 in 
Book 9978, Page 86; thence turning and running northeaster- 
ly four hundred one and eighteen hundredths (401.18) feet; 
thence turning and running southeasterly two hundred thir- 
ty-two and seventeen hundredths (232.17) feet, the last two 
lines being by Lot 8 on said plan; thence turning and run- 
ning southwesterly three hundred (300) feet; thence turning 
and running southeasterly one hundred six and seventy-four 
hundredths (106.74) feet; thence turning and running north- 
easterly ninety-six and thirty-five hundredths (96.35) feet 
to the point of beginning. 



36 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 
TO THE TOWN MEETING 
March 18, 1963 

(Presented to Adjourned Meeting, April 15, 1963) 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A, 
Section 6 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts, the Planning Board presents herewith its final 
report to the Town Meeting on its proposal to amend the 
Zoning Map of Lincoln, Massachusetts, dated February 2, 
1953, and thereafter amended, to include within the C-Open- 
Space Conservation District established under Section V-C 
of the Zoning By-Law of the Town a parcel of land on the 
westerly side of Conant Road, being a portion of the prop- 
erty owned, now or formerly, by Ranulf W. Gras, Richard S. 
Morgan, and Morton B. Braun, Trustees of the Valley Pond 
Realty Trust. 

The parcel of land is shown on a plan entitled "Valley 
Pond Dam Site", dated May, 1961, by Fay, Spofford and Thorn- 
dike, Inc., Engineers, Boston, Mass., copies of which have 
been available in the office of the Town Clerk and in the 
Town Hall . 

After due notice, the statutory hearing was held in 
the Town Hall on March 15, 1963. No material changes in 
the proposed amendment have been made. 

This action will place within the C-Open-Space Conser- 
vation District the entire area of the Valley Pond lying 
within the boundaries of the Town of Lincoln and, in addi- 
tion, a strip of land surrounding the pond. The Trustees 
of the Valley Pond Trust have indicated their consent to 
this action. 

•The placing of the Valley Pond within the C-Open-Space 
Conservation District constitutes a significant addition to 
the green belt reservation as proposed in the Braun-Eliot 
report, more particularly since the Trustees, in creating 
the Valley Pond, have added great recreational, conserva- 
tion and aesthetic value to the property with consequent 
benefit to the Town. The Planning Board recommends the 
addition of the Valley Pond to the C-Open-Space Conservation 
District. 

Paul Brooks Constantin A. Pertzoff 

Edith M. Henderson Warren R. Dwyer 

R. Langdon Wales 

Lincoln Planning Board 

37 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Article 2 6 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to accept as a public way the private way known as Fox Run 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wood- 
land Acres in Lincoln and Concord, Mass.", drawn by Williair 
J. Ford, Jr., Civil Engineer, and dated November 23, 1960. 
Said plan was approved by the Planning Board of the Town 
of Lincoln on March 30, 1961, and recorded with the Middle- 
sex Registry of Deeds on November 29, 1961, as Plan #1727 
of 1961. 

VOTED : That subject to final approval by the 
Board of Selectmen and to a deed under easement in form 
satisfactory to the Selectmen, the Town accept as a public 
way the private road known as Fox Run Road, as shown on a 
plan entitled "Plan of Land in Woodland Acres in Lincoln 
and Concord, Mass.", drawn by William J. Ford, Jr., Civil 
Engineer, and dated November 23, 1960. Said plan was 
approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln on 
March 30, 1961, and recorded with the Middlesex Registry 
of Deeds on November 29, 1961, as Plan #1727 of 1961. 

Article 27 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to accept as a public way the private way known as Stone- 
hedge, as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision of Land in 
Lincoln and Weston", drawn by Schofield Brothers, Regis- 
tered Land Surveyors and Civil Engineers, and dated August 
4, 1961. Said plan was approved by the Planning Board 
of the Town of Lincoln on September 13, 1961, and recorded 
with the Land Registry Office on December 15, 1961, Book 
652, Page 182, Certificate #104532. 

VOTED : That subject to final approval by the 
Board of Selectmen and to a deed under easement in form 
satisfactory to the Selectmen, the Town accept as a public 
way the private road known as Stonehedge, as shown on a 
plan entitled "Subdivision of Land in Lincoln and Weston", 
drawn by Schofield Brothers, Registered Land Surveyors and 
Civil Engineers, dated August 4, 1961. Said plan was ap- 
proved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln on 
September 13, 1961, and recorded in the Land Registry Of- 
fice on December 15, 1961, Book 652, Page 182, Certificate 
#104532. 

Article 28 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to accept as a public way the private road known as Laurel 
Drive, as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision of Land in 
Lincoln, Mass., owned by Brown's Wood, Incorporated", 
drawn by Ranulf W. Gras, dated February 8, 1955, approved 
by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln March, 1955, 
and recorded with the Middlesex Southern District Registry 
of Deeds at the end of Book 8475, or take any other action 



38 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 

Art lcle 29 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to accept as a public way the private road known as Mocca- 
sin Hill, as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision of Land 
in Lincoln, Mass., owned by Brown's Wood, Incorporated", 
drawn by Ranulf W. Gras , dated February 8, 1955, approved 
by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln March 9, 1955, 
and recorded with the Middlesex Southern District Registry 
of Deeds at the end of Book 8475, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 

Art icle 30 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000.00, or any other 
sum, for the purpose of obtaining a professional planning 
study and related engineering services in connection with 
land use and traffic in the Town. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate to 
the Planning Board the sum of $4,000.00 to be used for pro- 
fessional services toward a comprehensive analysis of the 
Town's land use, economic base, and highway traffic pat- 
terns, said sum to be used in connection with matching 
funds, if available, through the Housing Act of 1954, Title 
VII, Section 701, as amended. 

Ar t i c 1 e 31 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00, or any other 
sum, for the purpose of moving Civil Defense Headquarters 
to the basement of the Fire and Police Building, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,500.00 for the purpose of moving Civil Defense 
Headquarters to the basement of the Fire and Police Build- 
ing. 

Ar ticle 32 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to appropriate the sum of $10,000.00, or any other sum, 
for the purpose of laying water mains from Sandy Pond Road 
to connect with existing pipe on school property, said pipe 
to be not less than 8" in diameter, and to determine wheth- 
er the money shall be provided for by borrowing under au- 
thority of Clause (5), section (8), Chapter 44, General 
Laws, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 

Ar ticle 33 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to authorize the Water Commissioners to purchase a 1963 
4-wheel drive one ton truck with snow plow to replace ex- 

39 



TOWN MEETINGS 



isting equipment, and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$3,000.00, or any other sum, therefor, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorize the Water Com- 
missioners to purchase a 1963 four-wheel drive one ton 
truck with snow plow to replace existing equipment, and 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00, said sum to 
be taken from Water Department Surplus. 

Article 34 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to authorize the Water Commissioners to replace approxi- 
mately 1,000 feet of 4-inch cast iron pipe on Tower Road 
with 8" cement asbestos pipe, and to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $7,500.00, or any other sum, therefor, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town authorize the Water Com- 
missioners to replace approximately 1,000 feet of 4-inch 
cast iron pipe on Tower Road with 8" cement asbestos pipe, 
and to raise and appropriate the sum of $7,500.00, said 
sum to be taken from Water Department Surplus. 

Voted to adjourn at 12:45 A. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 3, 1963 

Pursuant to a warrant duly served, the Meeting was 
called to order at 7:35 P. M. by the Moderator, Mr. Charles 
Y. Wadsworth. Reverend Morris R. Robinson gave the invo- 
cation. The return of the warrant was read and the fol- 
lowing business was transacted: 

Ar t i c 1 e 1 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate from taxation, borrowing, the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of the 
Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting of March 16th, 
1959, or available funds, or any combination thereof, an 
additional sum of money sufficient, together with funds 
already appropriated, to construct and originally equip 
and furnish the elementary school buildings and facilities, 
for which funds were appropriated by vote of the Town under 
Article 5 of the Special Meeting on June 4, 1962, or, in 
the alternative, to approve such changes in, or elimina- 
tions from, said buildings and facilities as may be neces- 
sary to make possible the construction, equipment, and fur- 
nishing thereof with funds already appropriated, or take 



40 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



any other action in relation thereto. 

VOTED : (Affirmative 329; negative 30) That the 
additional sum of $95,000.00 be raised and appropriated 
for the purpose of constructing and originally equipping 
and furnishing elementary school buildings and appurtenant 
facilities, for which funds were appropriated by vote of 
the Town under Article 5 of the Special Meeting on June 4, 
1962, on the site of the Smith and Hartwell Schools; that 
to meet said appropriation 

(a) The Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, be, and he hereby is, authorized, at one time or from 
time to time, to borrow the sum of $95,000.00, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor, under the authority of 
and in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 645 of the 
Acts of 1948, as amended and supplemented, and the bonds or 
notes of such issue or issues shall be payable in accord- 
ance with Chapter 44 of the General Laws (Ter. Ed.), so 
that each issue of said bonds or notes shall be paid in 

not more than twenty (20) years from the date thereof and 
shall bear such date and shall be sold in such manner (ex- 
cept as herein or by law otherwise provided) as shall be 
determined by the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Sel ec tmen ; 

(b) The Committee appointed by the Moderator in 
accordance with the vote of the Town under Article 27 at 
the Annual Meeting on March 21, 1961 is hereby continued, 
and is hereby authorized and empowered to enter into con- 
tracts, and do or cause to be done all things necessary 

or desirable to construct and originally equip and furnish 
said elementary buildings and appurtenant facilities. 

Meeting adjourned at 9:45 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
November 18, 1963 

Pursuant to a warrant duly served, the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator at 7:35 P. M. The invo- 
cation was offered by Reverend Charles M. Styron. A quo- 
rum being present, the return of the warrant was read and 
the following transactions were enacted: 

Ar t i c 1 e 1 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to approve the transfer of $1,000.00 from the Water Depart 
ment Expense Account (#952), to the Water Department Wages 

41 



TOWN MEETINGS 

Account (#951), or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorize the transfer of 
$1,000.00 from the Water Department Expense Account (#952) 
to the Water Department Wages Account (#951). 



Article 2. 



to raise an 



To determine whether the Town 
d appropriate the sum of $6,400.00, o 



will vo 
r any o 



te 
ther 



sum, to be applied to the following: 
#11 







& 



#30 
#30 

or take any 

VOTED : 

sum of $5,3 

in Article 

#11 

#30 
#30 

said sum to 



- Fire Department, Salaries 

Wages 

3 - Highway Equipment, Maint. 

4 - Highways, Snow and ice 
removal & control 

other action relative thereto. 

That the Town raise and approp 
50.00 to be applied to the following 

5 of the 1963 budget: 

- Fire Department, Salaries & 
Wages 

- Highway Equipment, Maint. 

- Highways, Snow and ice 
removal and control 

be taken from free cash. 



$3,400.00 






2,000 
1 ,000 



riate t 
account 



.00 
.00 



he 
s 



$3,000.00 



1 , 600 
750 



.00 
.00 



Ar t i c 1 e 3 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to approve the amount of indebtedness, namely $40,000.00, 
authorized by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District 
School Committee at the adjourned session of the October 
22nd meeting, which adjourned session was held on October 
23rd, 1963, for the purpose of adding to the existing re- 
gional school building, or take any other action relative 
thereto , 

VOTED : That the Town approve the amount of in- 
debtedness, namely $40,000.00, authorized by vote of the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee at the 
adjourned session of the October 22nd meeting, which ad- 
journed session was held on October 23, 1963, for the pur- 
pose of adding to the existing Regional High School Build- 
ing. 

Article 4 . To determine whether the Town will vote 
to purchase for school access and parking purposes 4,400 
square feet of land with buildings thereon, situated on 
the southerly side of Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts, 
now or formerly owned by Joseph F. and Nellie M. Hurd, to 
raze the buildings thereon, and to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $6,900.00 therefor, or take any other action 



42 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 

Meeting adjourned at 9:15 P. M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 






43 



FINANCE 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 19 6 3 
General Water 



Total 



Cash balance 1/1/63 
Receipts, 1963: 
(See Accountant's 
report for detail) 



Warrant payments, 

1963 
Cash balance & U.S. 
Treasury bills, 

12/31/63 



$1 ,179 ,775.08 
2. 399 .166.65 



$3,578 



2, 358 



1.220 



$3,578 



Cash balance 12/31/63: 
Harvard Trust Co. $ 156 
New Eng. Merchants 

National 85 

Lexington Trust Co. 11 
Concord Cooperative Bk . 6 
First National Bank 

of Boston 
Belmont Savings Bank 5 
Beverly Savings Bank 6 
Boston Five Cents 

Savings Bank 5 

Brookline Savings Bank 3 
Cambridge Savings Bank 7 
Charlestown Savings Bk . 7 
Lynn Five Cents Savings 

Bank 6 

Newton Savings Bank 6 
Provident Institution 

for Savings 6 

Waltham Savings Bank 4 
Warren Institution 

for Savings 9 

U.S. Treasury bills @ cost: 



$250,000 due 1/16/64 

$250,000 due 2/20/64 

$100,000 due 3/19/64 

$200,000 due 4/15/64 

Certificate of deposit: 
$100,000 due 3/16/64 



247 

246 

98 

197 



100 



$1 ,220 



941.73 



128.12 



813.61 



941.73 



023.39 

764.59 
799.45 
000.00 

708.82 
946.67 
425.01 

973.02 
285.53 
123.27 
418.42 

630.40 
677.74 

759 .19 
053.94 

721.49 



501.92 
725.50 
907.67 
367.59 



000 .00 



$17,448.02 $1,197,223.10 



52.965.65 
$70,413.67 

54,092.74 

16.320.93 
$70,413.67 

$16,320.93 



2.452.132.30 
$3,649 ,355.40 



2,412,220.86 



1.237.134.54 
$3,649 ,355.40 



$ 172,344.32 

85 , 764.59 

11 ,799.45 

6,000.00 

708.82 
5,946.67 
6,425.01 

5,973.02 
3,285.53 
7,123.27 
7,418.42 

6,630.40 
6,677.74 

6, 759.19 
4,053.94 

9 ,721.49 



247,501.92 

246, 725.50 

98,907.67 

197,367.59 



100 .000.00 



813.61 $16,320.93 $1,237,134.54 



Frederick B. Taylor, Treasurer 



44 



FINANCE 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



Pr inc ipal 



300.00 $ 



Funds deposited in 
Middlesex Inst. 
for Sav ings 

Samuel Hartwell $ 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 
Annie A. Ray . 300.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

George F. Harrington 100.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

William W. Benjamin 500.00 

Abijah Jones 300.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Thomas Huddleston 200.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

Julia A. Bemis 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Elizabeth G. Chapin 300.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

Gardner Moore 300.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 
L. B. & A. E. Thiessen 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Raymond E. Hagerty 150.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

William H. Costello 100.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Suffolk-Franklin Savings Bank 



Income 
Accumu- 

1 ated 
before 

1963 



D 



ec 



31 



I ncome 



1963 
Bal ance 



124 
48 

208 

307 

178 
16 

196 
87 

105 
16 
91 

154 
32 

124 
14 
88 

154 
80 
56 
49 
60 

113 

109 

106 
55 

422 
56, 

227, 
65, 
65, 
41, 
64 
59, 
55, 
53, 
51, 
60, 
15, 
15, 
29, 
42, 
56, 



,22 
85 
56 
02 
52 
43 
68 
28 
32 
37 
54 
50 
42 
03 
74 
34 
31 
15 
83 
33 
96 
92 
35 
86 
92 
53 
54 
82 
10 
10 
03 
04 
68 
66 
00 
14 
83 
57 
19 
28 
09 
37 



17 
14 
20 
32 
27 
4 
18 
23 
16 
4 
13 
14 
9 
21 
4 
15 
18 
15 
10 
14 
8 
16 
16, 
24 
16, 
97, 
10 
29 
8, 
8, 
5, 
18, 
10, 
10, 
10, 
10, 
15, 
4, 
4, 
9, 
13, 
22. 



,12 
06 
52 
60 
40 
68 
02 
72 
36 
68 
78 
30 
38 
16 
12 
68 
34 
34 
34 
10 
50 
70 
52 
48 
38 
84 
34 
38 
68 
68 
68 
74 
46 
30 
22 
14 
56 
64 
64 
24 
80 
46 



441 
362 
529 
839 
705 
121 
464 
611 



34 
91 
08 
62 
92 
11 
70 
00 



421.68 
121.05 
355 .32 



368 
241 
545 
106 
404 
472 
395 



80 
80 
19 
13 
02 
65 
49 



267.17 
363.43 
219 .46 
430.62 
425 .87 
631.34 
422.30 
2 , 520. 37 
266.88 
757.20 
223.78 
223.78 
146.71 
482.78 
270.14 
265.96 
263.22 
261.28 
401 .39 
120.21 
119 .83 
238.52 
355.89 
578.83 



J. Waldo Smith 
Charles S. Smith 
Edward R. Farrar 
Anne D. Pollard 






300 .00 
300 .00 
300 .00 
300 .00 



52.41 
125.93 

51.82 
104.05 



14.33 
17.34 
14.30 
16.46 



366. 74 
443.27 
366.12 
420.51 



$14. 312.27 $4, 297.63 $751.51 $ 19 .361.41 



45 



FINANCE 



CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Proceeds of sale of Cemetery lots in 1963 
Interest income on savings account 
Withdrawn from savings bank 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, per vote under 
Article 14 of 1963 Annual Town 
Me e t i n g 

Interest allowed to accumulate in 
savings bank 

Deposited in savings bank 



$2,000.00 

446.02 
252.00 



Cash balance at December 31, 1963 

Bank Deposits at December 31, 1963 

Cash on deposit 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 



$ 332.00 

446.02 

2.000.00 

$ 2, 778.02 



2. 698.02 
$ 80 .00 



$ 80.00 

10. 750.27 

$ 10 .830.27 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 



Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1963 
Interest income received in 1963 
Appropriation by Town at 1963 Annual 
Town Meeting 
Less land purchase payment 

Deposited in savings bank 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



$4, 550.00 
4.000 .00 

$ 550,00 

18.14 



5.55 
18.14 



550.00 
573.69 



568.14 



5.55 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1963 

Cash on deposit 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 



$ 5.55 

1 .015.49 

$ 1 .021 .04 



Frederick B. Taylor 
Town Treasurer 



46 



FINANCE 



STABILIZATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1963 
Appropriations to Fund at 1963 Town 
Meet ing : 

For school s 

For land 

For equipment 
Interest income in 1963 

Deposited in savings banks 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



$ 



88 . 21 



$20 ,000.00 

4 , 550.00 

10 . 000 .00 



$34 , 600.00 
1 . 343.58 



34 , 550.00 

1 , 343 .58 
$35 ,981 . 79 



35 .943.58 
$ 38.21 



Bank Balances at December 31. It 63 



Cash on deposit 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Home Savings Bank 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bank 

Suffolk-Franklin Savings Bank 

Whitman Savings Bank 



$ 38.21 

.13 

.67 

. 32 

26,584.75 

6 . 897.54 

$65 .535.62 



38 

24 , 556 

6 , 764 

694 



Earmarked Balances in Fund 



For schools 

For land acquisition 

For general equipment 

Unallocated increment from income and gains 



$20,000.00 

19 ,050.00 

18 , 000.00 

8 . 485.62 

$65 . 535 . 62 



Frederick B. Taylor 
Town Treasurer 



47 



FINANCE 

OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$ 50,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $10,000 each 

December 1, 1964-1968, issued under Chapter 208, 
Acts of 1948. 

20,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each 

December 1, 1964-1968, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws, as amended. 

96,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $12,000 each 

December 1, 1964-1971, issued under Chapter 356, 
Acts of 1951. 

32,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 each 

December 1, 1964-1971, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws, as amended. 

280,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each Octo- 
ber 1, 1964-1977, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

45,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each 
October 1, 1964-1972, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws, as amended. 

180,000 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $15,000 each Novem- 
ber 1, 1964-1967, and $10,000 each November 1, 
1968-1979, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

710,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $40,000 each Novem- 
ber 15, 1964-1972, and $35,000 each November 15, 
1973-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948. 

95,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000 each Novem- 
ber 15, 1964-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948. 



$ 1,508,000 Total School Loans 

70,000 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 

each October 1, 1964-1977, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws, as amended. 

35,000 Library Addition Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each 
August 1, 1964-1970, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws, as amended. 



$ 1 ,613 ,000 Net Debt 

15,000 Water Main Loan, 2.70%, due $5,000 each October 1, 
1964-1966, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, 
as amended. 

25,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each August 1, 
1964-1968, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, 
as amended. 



$ 1,653,000 Total debt. 

Frederick B. Taylor, Treasurer 

48 



FINANCE 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

M. Elizabeth Causer 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1961, less abatements 

Valuation 1962, less abatements 

Valuation 1963, less abatements 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1961, less abatements 

Valuation 1962, less abatements 

Valuation 1963, less abatements 



$8 , 712, 463.00 
8 ,963 , 117.00 
9 ,172,969 .00 



1 , 710 , 517.00 
1 , 811 , 365 .00 
1 , 738 , 852.00 



Net Valuation 

Average Net Valuation 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 



$32, 109 , 283.00 

10 , 703 ,094 .00 

535,154.00 



FUNDED DEBT 

General, Inside Limit 

Outs ide Limit 
Enterprise, Water 

TOTAL FUNDED DEBT, January 1, 19 64 

AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY, January 1, 1964 



$ 202,000.00 

1 ,411 , 000 .00 

40.000 .00 

$1 , 653 , 000 .00 

$ 333,154.00 



49 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year 
Polls 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Prior Years 
Polls 
Personal 
Real Estate 



From the State 

Income tax 

Income tax, Ch. 70 

Corporation tax 

Meals tax 

Reimbursement, loss of taxes 

Aid to Libraries 

Land acquisition 



City of Cambridge, in lieu 
of taxes 

Permits 

Bu i 1 d i n g 
Plumbing 
Wir ing 



Fines 
Court 

Grants and Gifts 

School Construction 
School Transportation 
School Construction, matching 
funds 



From Federal Grants 
Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Assistance to the Aged 
Medical Assistance to the Aged Adm 
Aid to Dependent Families 
Aid to Dependent Families Adm. 
Disability Assistance 
Disability Assistance Adm. 

School Aid, Ch. 874 

Nat'l Defense Education, Ch. 864 

Air Force School Operation 



$ 2,066.00 
110,510.96 
905 .475.55 



$1,018 ,052.51 



14,00 




56,65 




15 ,999.67 






16 ,070.32 


17,5 70.00 




104,619.73 




28,560.00 




750.22 




2,159.09 




1 ,403.25 




2,000.00 






157,062.29 




1,817.87 


839 .80 




354,00 




320.50 






1 ,514.30 




315.00 



24, 713.65 
26, 748.73 

100 .000 .00 



5 


,084, 


.00 




788, 


.35 


5 


,431, 


.65 




212, 


,69 




738, 


.00 




572, 


.18 




108, 


.20 




232, 


,50 


5 


,089, 


,00 


10 


,012, 


,17 


324 


,735, 


,05 



151 ,462.38 



13,167.57 



339 ,836.22 



50 



FINANCE 



From County 
Dog Licenses 
Dog Care & Killing 
Sale of Dogs 



Pr ivileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Levy of 1962 
Farm Exc i se 



804.41 
47.00 
27.00 



92, 538 .51 

15,657.31 

114. 39 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 
Town Clerk 
Treasurer 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 



153.81 

4.00 

151 .88 

345.00 

85 .00 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Police: Pistol permits 

Insurance reports 

Services 
Fire Department 
Tree Department: 

Dutch Elm removal, 

private property 

Fogging (mosquito control) 



41 .90 

55 .50 

223.00 

150 .00 

789.61 



60.00 
21 .00 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Dog Inoculations 
Nurses ' fees 
Garbage collections 
License s 



114 

120 

8 ,434 

32 



50 
00 
40 
50 



878.41 



Chapter 90 Construction 
State Aid 
County Aid 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 
State Aid 
County Aid 

Snow Removal 
State Aid 
Miscellaneous 



108 , 310.21 



739 .69 



1 , 341.01 







8, 701.40 


HIGHWAYS 


1 ,088.24 
544.12 

1 ,495.72 
1 ,495.72 

342.00 
15.60 


1 ,632.36 
2,991.44 



357,60 



51 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



State Reimbursement 
Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Assistance to the Aged 
Medical Assistance to the Aged Adm. 
Aid to Dependent Families 
Aid to Dependent Families Adm. 
Disability Assistance 
Disability Assistance Adm. 
Veterans' Services 



5,242 

265 

3, 622 

74 

502 

77 

1,112 

32 



72 
14 
74 
77 
33 
19 
14 
63 



1.672.30 



$ 12,601.96 



SCHOOL AND LIBRARY 



Madison Project 
Tui t ion 

Vocational Education: 
State Reimbursement 
Gym rent and miscellaneous 
Milk Fund 

Air Force Cafeteria 
School damage 
Library Fines 
Library, miscellaneous 



3 


,800 


.00 




500 


.00 




398 


.18 




270 


.25 


7 


,070 


.94 


17 


,407 


.74 




64 


,32 


2 


,111 


.85 




59 


,60 



31 , 682.88 



UNCLASSIFIED 



DeCordova reimbursement for 

State Au d i t 
Water Department reimbursement 
Insurance settlements 
B.C.-B.S. reimbursement (Air 

Force School ) 
School building construction 

bid deposits 



200.00 

1,074.47 

168.57 

2,521.60 

325.00 



4,289.64 



Swimming program 
Stage-mobile 
Tennis instruction 
Arts and Crafts 



RECREATION 



CEMETERIES 



Interments 
Foundat ions 
Investment Fund 



946.00 
148.29 
604.50 
389 .00 



600 .00 

60.00 

2.000.00 



2,087.79 



2,660.00 



52 



FINANCE 



INTEREST 



Interest on taxes 

Interest on U. S. Gov't bonds 

Interest on savings accounts 



$ 821.01 
18 , 446 .64 

2.822.09 



AGENCY TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



22 , 089 . 74 



Agency 

Dog Lie enses 
Grammar School Fund 
Group Insurance Dividend 
DeCordova School Equip. Fund 
Transfer from Water Department 



REFUNDS 



General Departments 



LOANS 



Employee deductions 

Mass. Tax payment for services 

Temporary Loan 

School Project Loan 

Premium &. interest on Loan 



Total General Receipts 

Cash balance January 1, 1963 



1 , 273.50 

48.96 

1 , 371 .48 

926 .42 

1.575.00 



199 ,947.92 

23.95 

200 ,000 .00 

95 , 000.00 

119 .99 



5 , 195 . 36 



791 .84 



495 , 091 .86 

$2, 400 , 741 . 65 

1 . 179 . 775.08 
$3 , 580 ,516.73 



WATER REVENUE 



Water Rates 

Water connections 

Hydrant rentals 

Total Water Department Receipts 

Cash Balance January 1, 1963 



$ 49 , 157.98 

312.67 

3 . 495 .00 



52 ,965 . 65 



17 . 448.02 
70 ,413. 67 



53 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



EXPENDITURES 
PAYMENTS ON SELECTMEN'S WARRANTS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Executive Officer 

Finance Committee 

Town Of f ice 

Town Accountant 

Treasurer 

Collector 

As sessor s 

Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election & Registration 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Conservation Commission 

Consulting & Engineering 

Town Hall 





972 


.68 


5 


, 699 


.20 




15 


.00 


13 


,955 


.03 


4 


,126 


.59 


1 


, 285 


.17 


3 


,848 


.38 


1 


,207 


.33 


2 


,016 


.90 




656 


.89 




950 


.70 


2 


, 769, 


.88 




205, 


.62 




70, 


.00 


2 


,793. 


,00 


5 


,799, 


.13 



$ 46,371.50 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



Pol ice 

Fire 

Communications 

Civil Defense 

Fire & Police Building 

Park Department 

Inspectors of Buildings 



41,070.77 

32, 706.35 

16, 392.81 

1, 727.84 

4,489.53 

15, 792.30 

937.50 



113 ,117.10 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Salar ies 

Expense 

Inspection Services 

Garbage Collection 

Inspector of Animals 



4, 520.00 
390.09 
565.78 

7,845.43 
100.00 



13,421.30 



HIGHWAYS 



Hi ghway s 

Highway Building 
Repairs to Public Ways 
Chapter 90 Maintenance 
Chapter 90 Construction 



91 ,941.22 
1, 697.07 
9 , 651.97 
4,500.00 

8.25 



107, 798.51 



54 



FINANCE 



CHARITIES 



Aid to C i t i zens 
Admin istration 
Veterans' Services 



$ 24,830.41 

2 , 423 .39 

629 . 24 



EDUCATION 



Elementary School 

Regional High School 

Elementary School Construction 

Chapter 874 

Air Force School 

Purchase of Land 



LIBRARY 



Li br ar y 

Library Building 
Bu ilding Renovation 
Library Clock 



RECREATION 



Playground 
Swimming 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Middlesex County Pension Fund 

Employee Insurance & Hospital Fund 

Property &, Indemnity Insurance 

Dump Rent & Maintenance 

Town Reports 

Memorial Day 

July 4th 

Preservation of Town Records 

Purchase of Codman Property 

Purchase of Codman Property 

Purchase of Easement 

Purchase of Codman Property 

Purchase of Garland Land 

Stabilization Fund 

Conservation Fund 



CEMETERIES 



73 
99 
52 
05 
92 
4 , 000 .00 



567, 535 
192 ,960 
158 , 472 
19 , 162 
322, 063 



26 , 932.41 

5 , 629 . 12 

514. 78 

1 . 000 .00 



5 , 888.98 

712.80 



14 


, 528 . 28 


10 


,517.73 


12 


,997.86 


4 


,500.00 


2 


, 188.14 




231.70 




996.60 




38.69 


9 


, 800 .00 




100.00 




100.00 


5 


, 700.00 


4 


,000.00 


34 


, 550.00 




550.00 



$ 27 , 883 .04 



1 , 264 , 195 .21 



34 , 076. 31 



6 ,601 . 78 



100 , 799 .00 



Cemeter ies 



3,149.31 



55 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 



Bond Payments 

Interest 

Interest on Tax Notes 



$120,000.00 

49 , 255 .00 

1.230.00 



Refunds 



REFUNDS 



AGENCY TRUST & INVESTMENT 



Dog Licenses due County 

Sale of Dogs 

Milk Fund 

Hanscom School Cafeteria 

Repayment of Temporary Loan 

State Parks & Reservations 

State Audit 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Tax 

Premium on School Loan 

Accrued Interest 

Bid Deposits 



Employee Deductions 

Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance December 31, 1963 



1, 283,00 

27.00 

7, 233.96 

21 , 364.37 

200 ,000 .00 

3,220.54 

1, 270.83 

3,478,83 

22,447.18 

825,35 

1, 310.73 

300^00 



$ 170,485.00 



9 ,139.64 



262, 761.79 

199 .903.63 

$2, 359 , 703.12 

1 .220.813.61 
$3,580,516. 73 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Operating 

Pumping Station 

Water Mains 

Bonds and Interest 

Truck 

Test Wells 

Total Water Department Expenditures 

Cash Balance December 31, 1963 



$ 26,985,63 



4,114 

8,126 

11 , 300 

2,842 

723 



78 
59 
00 
24 
50 



$ 54,092.74 

16 . 320.93 
$ 70,413.67 



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FINANCE 



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69 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 19 6 3 

GENERAL ACCOUNTS 

ASSETS 

Cash : 
General $1,220,813.61 

Water 16,320.93 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes : 
Levy of 1961 
Personal $ 55.00 

Real 1.421.45 1,476.45 

Levy of 1962 
Poll 10.00 

Personal 87.55 

Real 4.022.60 4,120.15 

Levy of 1963 
Personal 173.60 

Real 17.449 .11 17,622.71 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise: 
Levy of 1961 2,619.02 

Levy of 1962 1,800.98 

Levy of 1963 24.023.94 28,443.94 

Underestimates : 

State Parks & Reservations 353.58 

County Tax 108.45 

County Hospital »01 

Water : 
Rates 1962 87.53 

Rates 1963 4. 313.73 4.401.26 

$1,293,661.09 



LIABILITIES & RESERVE 

Proceeds of Dog Licenses: $ 

Due County 7.50 

Trust Fund Income: 
Julian DeCordova School Equipment 

Fund $ 926.42 

Grammar School Fund 48.96 975.38 

Federal Grants: 

Disability Assistance 209.64 

Disability Assistance Adm. 143.20 

Aid to Dependent Families 601.00 

Aid to Dependent Families Adm. 316.29 

Old Age Assistance 3,256.29 

70 



FINANCE 



Old Age Assistance Adm. $ 179.41 

Medical Assistance to the Aged 1,626.69 
Medical Assistance Adm. 35 .00 $ 6,367.52 

School s : 

P. L. 874 10,996.97 

P. L. 864 5,063.13 

Madison Fund 3,800.00 

Air Force School 195,729.74 

School Milk Fund 405.82 

Air Force School Cafeteria 316 . 11 216,311.77 

Appropriation Balances: 
Revenue : 
General 56,720.22 

Non Revenue : 
School Construction 806 . 492. 66 863,212.88 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1961 1,476.45 

Levy of 1962 457.13 

Levy of 1963 6.404. 38 8,337.96 

Overlay Surplus 6,249.24 

Revenue Reserved until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 28,443.94 

Water Rates 1962 87.53 

Water Rates 1963 4,313.73 

Surplus Revenue: 
General 143,032.71 

Water 16 . 320.93 

$1 , 293 , 661 .09 



71 



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73 



ASSESSORS 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Elmer H. Ziegler 
George G. Tarbell, Jr. 
Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 

In carrying out its appointed tasks, the Board would like 
to point out that it has but one objective, - that every build- 
ing and parcel of land be fairly assessed in ratio to the other 
property in town. To this end, when visiting properties, con- 
sideration is given to type of construction, quality, age, con- 
dition, location and such other factors. This information is 
listed in a card file along wTtli other pertinent data such as: 
Registry of Deeds book and page numbers, sale information, a 
plan sketch of the building with dimensions, room count and com- 
parative buildings. More recently, a file of photographs of 
buildings is also being made. With this information, along 
with personal visits, the Board is better equipped to make its 
decisions and thus carry out its objective. 

The Board extends its sincere appreciation to the citizens 
of the Town for the spirit in which they have received our visits 
which, of necessity, often come at inconvenient times. The 
Board also wishes to make it clear that property owners should 
feel free to discuss their mutual problems with the Board. 

Your attention is directed to the following items: 

(1) All real estate and personal property abatement re- 
quests must be filed by October 1st of the year in question, 
according to law. 

(2) Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of 
the Purple Heart award, and others, may qualify for a tax exemp- 
tion. Please contact the Board to see if you qualify. 

(3) Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1963 now provides cer- 
tain exemptions for tax payers over the age of 70 who meet cer- 
tain requirements of income, residence, etc. Additional in- 
formation can be obtained at the Assessors* office. 

(4) All requests for motor vehicle and trailer excise 
abatements must be filed with the Board not later than June 30th 
of the succeeding year. No abatement may reduce the excise 
collected to less than $2.00. 

(5) The Board meets regularly the first Tuesday of 
each month in the Town Hall at 8 P. M. 






74 



FINANCE 



1963 Recapitulation 

Total appropriations to be raised from taxation 
Total appropriations to be taken from 

available funds 

State Parks and Assessments: 
State Parks and Reservations 
State Audit of Muncipal Accounts 

County Tax and Assessments: 
County Tax 
Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 

Overlay of current year 

Gross Amount to be raised 



$1 , 392 ,917. 68 
96,906.32 



2, 866.96 
1 , 270.83 



22, 338 .73 
3,478.83 

25 . 220.12 

$1 ,544,999.47 



Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Income Tax 

Corporation Taxes 

Reimbursement a/c publicly owned land 

Old Age Tax 

Motor Vehicle &, Trailer Excise 

Old Age Assistance 

School s 

Libr ar ies 

Water Department 

Interest 

State assistance for school construction 

All others 
Total, Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

Overestimates of previous year 
Appropriations voted to be taken from 

available funds 

Net amount to be raised by taxation on polls and 

property 



$ 124,795.39 

27, 295.60 

858.34 

942.52 

110 ,000 .00 

12, 227.00 

27, 698.00 

2,083.00 

49 , 123.00 

4,021 .00 

24, 714.00 

16 . 847.00 

$ 400,604.85 

412.86 

96,906.32 



1 .047.075.44 
$1 ,544,999 .47 



Number of Polls 

Total Valuation: 
Personal Property 
Real Estate 



1,156 at $2.00 



$ 988,255 at $112.00 
8. 339 .990 at $112.00 
$ 9 , 328 , 245 



Number of acres of land assessed: 
Number of dwelling houses assessed: 



Tax Rate per thousand 



School Rate 
General Rate 



7 ,668.89 
1 ,069 

67.30 
44.70 



$ 



2, 312.00 



110,684.56 

934.078.88 

$1 ,047,075.44 



$112.00 



75 



Protection of Persons and Property 

FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENTS 

Leo J. Algeo, Chief 

I hereby submit my report for the Fire and Police De 
partments for the year ending December 31, 1963. 

Fire Department . 

The department answered a total of 273 emergency 
calls as listed below: 

Buildings 6 

Chimney 3 

Brush and woods 86 

Motor vehicle fires 15 
Electric wires down or 

arcing 17 

Motor vehicle accidents 48 

Rescusitator 2 

Mutual aid 3 

Town Dump 19 

False alarms 2 

Miscellaneous 72 



273 

The building fires consisted of four houses and one 
business garage. The total estimated loss in these fires 
was $45,935.00. 

Fourteen of the brush and woods fires and two of the 
mutual aid calls were the result of fires caused by the 
Boston and Maine railroad engines. Consequently, the 
Boston and Maine Railroad has been billed a total of 
$726.45 to cover the cost of labor in extinguishing these 
fires. In March, 1963, the Town of Lincoln received a 
check from the Boston and Maine for $685.61, which was the 
claim for labor expenses during the year 1962. 

Twenty-five inspections were made and permits issued 
for oil burner installations or alterations. Six in- 
spections were made and permits issued for storage of liqui 
fied petroleum gas. Sixteen permits for blasting were 
issued . 



76 



PROTECTION 



A policy has been established whereby the fire alarm 
system is completely tested every month. Each of the 
street boxes is pulled and the master boxes at the schools 
and other public buildings are activated. 

Rest homes and nursing homes have been periodically 
checked according to State laws. 

During Fire Prevention Week fire drills were con- 
ducted in all the schools at the request of this depart- 
ment by Superintendent of Schools Robert J. Filbin. It 
was obvious to this department that the staff and children 
of our schools have been well drilled in this all important 
matter . 

During the month of July the New England Fire Insur- 
ance Rating Association made an inspection of fire pro- 
tection facilities in the Town of Lincoln. As a result of 
this inspection, the Association, because of "improved pro- 
tection** upgraded Lincoln to Grade C, effective December 
30, 1963. The Association recommended, "That immediate 
consideration be given to replacing the present North Fire 
Station." It is hoped that this replacement can be accom- 
plished in 1966 in accordance with the Long-Term Capital 
Requirements Committee Report. The Association further 
reported that Engine #2, a 1947 Diamond T, was capable of 
pumping only 353 gallons per minute and failed to meet 
their requirements of 500 gallons per minute for which it 
is rated. In this matter the Association stated, "Appara- 
tus 20 years of age, or apparatus which cannot be economic- 
ally rehabilitated, should be replaced**. This engine be- 
cause of its age and condition cannot be economically re- 
habilitated and should be replaced in 1965, in accordance 
again with the Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee Re- 
port . 

The Board of Selectmen have been asked to authorize 
the employment of another full time man on the department 
so that we may have a driver on duty at the station 24 
hours a day. 

This department has also requested a four-wheel drive 
pick-up truck. This truck would be a utility type vehic- 
le and would be used for many things: fighting woods fires, 
which we now have difficulty in reaching, testing and re- 
pair work on the alarm system, picking up hose and equip- 
ment, doing routine inspection work, plowing snow, and re- 
ducing wear on the other trucks. 



77 



POLICE 



A standard Red Cross First Aid course was given to 
both fire and police personnel by Sgt. James Hanley of the 
Concord Police Department in February and March. Nineteen 
men received certificates after completing this course. 

In June the department was most fortunate to receive 
from Mr. and Mrs. Constantin Pertzoff a house, for drill 
purposes, which was to be destroyed. With our very capa- 
ble friend, Chief Wyman Johnson, of the Weston Fire De- 
partment as director, the department conducted four realis- 
tic drills at the house. Serving as instructors at these 
drills were Deputy Chiefs Bill Dean, Bill Doherty and Tom 
Coan. The fire department would welcome the opportunity 
to destroy any such valueless buildings, conditions per- 
mitting. These drills and the first aid course are part 
of a training program based on the policy of having eight 
monthly drills and a series of weekly drills each Spring. 

Beyond the training reported above, seven members of 
the department attended courses at the New Hampshire Fire 
Chief's Training School in Fitzwilliam, New Hampshire. 
The men, Deputy Chief Tom Coan, Robert Malloy, Jr., David 
Malloy, George Heck, Carl Smith, Carl Smith, Jr., and Steve 
Ziegler spent a total of 80 hours on the weekend of Septem- 
ber 14th studying such subjects as fire fighting, hose and 
ladder work, breathing apparatus, and others. 

In cooperation with Civil Defense Director Ernest 
Johnson, four men took a course in Radiological Monitoring 
at Area Headquarters at the Veterans* Hospital in Bedford. 
These men, Deputy Chief William Doherty, Captain Robert 
Tracey, Joe Cotoni, Jr., and David Malloy attended three 
evenings for a total of eight hours each. 

On November 1, 1963, Walter Porter retired from the 
department after serving for 25 years. Walter was a de- 
voted town servant and the members of the fire department 
wish many years of happiness to him and his wife Mildred. 

Elsewhere in this report you will find your Lincoln 
Fire Alarm Code listing. You are urged to read carefully 
the pertinent information on the reverse side of the card. 

Police Department 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 40 
Arrests by State Police 21 



78 



PROTECTION 



Warning notices issued for 
violations of Motor 
Veh i c le Law 4 7 

Violations of Motor Vehicle 
Law reported to Registry 
of Motor Vehicles 34 

Motor Vehicle accident report: 

Accidents reported 160 

Occupants injured 161 

Occupants killed 1 

Following is a partial list of other activities of 
the Police Department: 

Appearances in court 70 

Emergency calls, other than 

automobile accidents 64 

Vacant houses checked 3339 

Business places checked 

(Sept. through Dec.) 1469 

Miscellaneous items 

r ecor ded 2691 

On May 20, 1963, Richard J. Hallett was appointed to 
the department by the Board of Selectmen. Patrolman Hall- 
ett will attend the Local Police Officers* Training School 
at the State Police Academy in Framingham sometime in 1964. 

Deputy Chief Daniel A. Maclnnis attended a Police 
Training Program presented by the Massachusetts Division of 
Youth Service at the Framingham Police Officers* Station in 
the Spring. This program covered many of the problems 
concerning pol ice- j uveni le relations and consisted of ten 
all-day sessions. Patrolman Frank W. Gordon attended an 
Investigation Training School at Natick for one week in 
October. This school was conducted by the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. 

At the end of the 1963 school year, Mrs. Mary Hayes 
resigned as a School Crossing Guard and Mrs. Anne Sturgis 
has replaced her. 

Chief Algeo, Deputy Chief Maclnnis, and the whole de- 
partment are still very much concerned with the mysterious 
disappearance of Joan M. Risch on October 24, 1961. To- 
gether with a Detective of the State Police, every possible 



79 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



clue which arises is being investigated by this department 

On December 16, 196-3, we of the fire and police de- 
partments were stunned at the untimely death of our fellow 
worker and Selectman, Charles K. Fitts. Charlie, who 
accomplished so much for our departments as a Selectman, 
was always ready to pitch into the cause for public safety 
as a firefighter or policeman. The members of the fire 
and police departments will not soon forget Charlie. We 
have so much about us that he fought to provide us with, 
to serve as reminders of him. Our deepest sympathy is 
extended to Mrs. Fitts and her family. 



CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 

Ernest L. Johnson, Director 

The Lincoln Civil Defense Headquarters and Control 
Center is now located in the basement of the Fire-Police 
Station. At least 75% of the work on this new control 
center has been completed. All radios and monitoring 
equipment are fully operational and monthly tests with the 
State are made regularly. 

Our State Civil Defense Agency now answers directly 
to the Federal Department of Defense. Activities at 
these levels are at an all time high. All Departments 
at the State level under the fine new leadership of Direc- 
tor Daniel Finn are, at all times, fully operational. 

It is our aim here in Lincoln to continue to cooperate 
with the State on their accelerated programs, although time 
and funds will no doubt limit us to minimum standards. A 
satisfactory rating in this respect keeps our community 
eligible for many additional benefits. 



80 



PROTECTION 



TREE WARDEN 

Albert S. Brooks 

The Dutch Elm disease continued to be the major prob- 
lem of the tree department in 1963, as the largest share 
of the work was in removing diseased trees. About seven- 
ty-five trees were removed and burned. In the late 
spring, twenty-seven elms in various parts of the town 
were selected and treated against Dutch Elm disease with 
"Klutone", which makes a total of about seventy trees 
treated in 1962 and 1963. Of these trees, two have died 
completely; both of them had a severe case of the disease 
when treated. Four that had the disease in 1962 when 
treated, with one having a very severe case, now appear 
healthy, and we have three treated trees that are doubtful. 
I feel we should wait at least another year before doing 
anything more along this line so as to get a more complete 
picture of just what the results of this treatment are. 

It was felt necessary to control the elm leaf beetle 
this year as the damage has been so great in other years. 
The elms were sprayed in early June with "Seven 1 " with very 
good results. "Seven" does a very good job with a mini- 
mum of damage. I believe it is necessary to continue 
this spray each year. 

Some spraying for brush and poison ivy control was 
done in July. Because of pressure of other work, the pro- 
gram of brush control has not been working as I would like, 
but I still believe in the program, and unless some better 
way is found I think we should strive to carry it out as 
we are attempting to do now. 



81 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Abigail Avery 

Pierre Dreyfus, M. D. 

Gordon Donaldson, M. D., Chairman 

Following the election in March, 1963, the Board of 
Health met and voted to continue as of the previous year. 
Mrs, David Garrison was reappointed to the office of 
Agent; Mr. William Davis, Burial Agent; Dr. Alden Russell, 
Inspector of Slaughtering; and Mr. George Browning, Jr., 
Inspector of Animals. 

The usual inspections were made during the year, in- 
cluding piggeries, restaurants, cider presses, stores, 
overnight cabins, and rest homes. The following licen- 
ses were issued: garbage transportation, 3; methyl alco- 
hol, 4; overnight cabins, 1; piggeries, 2; massage, 1; 
victuallers, 5. Three nursery schools were also in- 
spected and licensed. A new State law, enacted in 1963, 
defines rather strict standards for the personnel, pro- 
gram, and physical facilities of all agencies providing 
day care for children under school age. The Board of 
Health has been granted permission to carry out inspect- 
ions, and is now working on its own detailed licensing 
program for the three nursery schools in Lincoln. Final- 
ly, the Board has been in constant review of the problems 
created by construction of new homes and by a number of 
land subdivisions presented for approval. A total of 
60 permits were approved by the Board, of which 25 were 
building permits for new homes and 35 for alterations and 
improvements. Three subdivisions were approved by the 
Board in 1963. 

The following communicable diseases were reported: 
chicken pox, 32; strep throats and scarlet fever, 24; 
mumps, 55; German measles, 69; measles, 1; typhoid, 1. 
The one case of typhoid fever concerned a child who had 
visited Zermatt, Switzerland, where she had acquired symp- 
toms of the disease. The case was followed very care- 
fully by the Department of Public Health and a private 
physician, and after some days made a complete and un- 
eventful recovery. 



82 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 






As in previous years, a number of clinic 
The annual dental screening of all school chi 
been continued by Dr. William Tingey, with th 
of Mrs. Garrison and Mrs. Stanley Tead. Thr 
and sixty-six children were referred to priva 
for treatment. The Well Child Conference wa 
by Dr. John Davies at monthly intervals. Dr 
80 children up to the age of 7. Many of the 
were for routine physical examination of 5-ye 
ren entering kindergarten. In addition to t 
tions, small-pox vaccinations, triple vaccine 
tetanus -whoop ing cough immunizations) and Sab 
iomyelitis vaccine were given when needed. 



s wer e hel d . 
1 dr en has 
e as s i s t anc e 
ee hundred 
te dentists 
s conduc ted 
. Davies saw 
se visits 
ar old child- 
hese examina- 
( d iphther ia- 
in oral pol - 



In January, March, and May of 1963, Lincoln joined 
other cities and towns of the Commonwealth in a drive to 
immunize adults and children with Sabin polio vaccine, 
Types I, II, and III. According to careful records kept 
by Mrs. Stanley Tead in the two years that the Sabin vac- 
cine was dispensed in Lincoln, the following number of in 
dividuals (adults and children) received the three types: 
Type I, 2726; Type II, 2594; Type III, 2350. 

The Mental Health Program in the schools was con- 
ducted under the able supervision of Mrs. Rogers, one of 
the social workers from the Walden Clinic in Concord. 
Mr s. Rogers visits the Lincoln schools at weekly inter- 
vals, and in her consultations, meets with teachers and 
parents to discuss the problems at hand. The principals 
and teachers of our schools feel that this professional 
help is of great value in advising them how best to help 
children with behavior problems. 

The annual Dog Clinic was held in the Town Barn in 
May. Of the 555 dogs registered in the Town of Lincoln, 
only 336 received anti-rabies vaccine at our Clinic. Al- 
though it is realized that some dogs may be vaccinated 
by private veterinarians, many must run at large without 
this protection, posing a danger to the public and a le- 
gal hazard to the owner. 

The Emerson Hospital Nursing Service has proven ef- 
fective in giving home nursing care under Mrs. Garrison's 
supervision. A visiting nurse is provided any one at 
the rate of three dollars per visit plus travel charges. 
Arrangements for these visits are made through Mrs. Garri- 
son or by telephoning directly to the Hospital. 



83 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



During the year the Board of Health has had the 
opportunity to meet with the Selectmen, the Planning 
Board, and the School Committee to discuss subjects of 
common interest, such as the Mental Health and Speech 
Rehabilitation programs in our schools, the proposed -new 
zoning by-laws, and the various land subdivisions under 
consideration. 

Lastly, the Board wishes to thank a number of volun- 
teers for their participation in the various clinics spon- 
sored by the Health Department during the year. Without 
the invaluable help given by Mrs. Bradford Cannon, Mrs. 
Malcolm Donaldson, Mrs. Robert Emerson, Mrs. Rufus Grason, 
Mrs. Donald Loveys, Mrs. Ralph Ruocco, and Mrs. Stanley 
Tead, our Clinics could not have been effective. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

George U. Browning, Jr. • 

The following animals are all under the rules and 
regulations of the Department of Livestock Disease Con- 
trol of the Department of Agriculture. I have supplied 
them with a list of the owners (on whose premises the 
animals are kept) and the number and kinds of these ani- 
mals in Lincoln. 

No. of dairy cows over 2 years 54 

No. of dairy cows 1-2 years 18 

No. of dairy cows under 1 year 12 

No. of dairy bulls 1 

No. of beef cattle 34 

Total number of horses 59 

Total number of goats 7 

Total number of sheep 17 

Total number of swine 731 

Fourteen dog bites were reported during the year. 
These dogs were quarantined and released at the end of 
ten days as no sign of rabies appeared. 



84 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

M. Elizabeth Causer, Director 

During the year 1963, aid was extended as follows 

Old Age Assistance, ten cases. 

Medical Assistance to the Aged, eight cases. 

Disability Assistance, one case. 

Aid to Dependent Families, one case. 

General Relief, three cases. 



Rece ip t s : 

U. S. Government - 



O.A.A. 

M.A.A. 
A.D.F. 
D.A. 



$5 , 084 .00 

5 , 431 .65 

738 .02 

232 . 50 



$11 ,486.17 



Comm. of Mass 



Refunds 



Total Receipts 



O.A.A. 

M.A.A. 
A.D.F. 
D.A. 
Meals Tax 



5 , 242. 72 
3 , 622. 74 

502 . 33 
1,112.14 

750 . 22 



11 ,230.15 

64.50 
$22 , 780 . 82 



Disbursements : 

Federal Accounts 



Town Funds 



Total Disbursements 



O.A.A. 


$4 , 838.08 


M.A.A. 


5 , 307.87 


A.D.F. 


137 .00 


D.A. 


33.83 


O.A.A. 


6 , 364.56 


M.A.A. 


5 , 397.06 


A.D.F. 


823.00 


D.A. 


172.15 


G.R. 


1 , 756.86 



$10 , 316. 78 



14.513.63 
$24 , 830.41 



85 






Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 

Edith M. Henderson, Vice -Chairman 

Constantin A. Pertzoff 

Warren R. Dwyer 

David L. Garrison 

At its organizational meeting on April 10, 1963, the 
Planning Board elected Mr. .R. Langdon Wales chairman and 
Mrs. Edith M. Henderson vice-chairman. The Board wel- 
comed Mr. David Garrison as its new member and voted its 
thanks to the retiring member, Mr, Paul Brooks, who con- 
tinues his capable service to the Town as Conservation 
Commissioner. Mrs. Elizabeth J. Snelling, in dividing 
her half days and countless long evenings between the 
Board of Assessors and the Planning Board, gives priceless 
service to the Board and the Town in providing continuity, 
speedy execution of Board business and an informal and 
diplomatic communication with individuals having Planning 
Board business. 






A. 



PLANNING POLICIES 



Under the statutes the Planning Board is charged with 
making studies and preparing plans of the resources, possi- 
bilities and needs of the town and with the administration 
of subdivision control. During 1963, despite an increase 
in subdivision activity, the Board has attempted to place 
primary emphasis on its planning function. 

Over the years since its establishment, the Planning 
Board has evolved a series of planning policies, that 
serve as a basis for the Board's recommendations, as fol- 
lows : 

1. Character of the Town . The existing low- 
density pattern of development of the town and the topo- 
graphy of the land establish a semi-rural physical charac- 
ter although the prevailing land use is residential. The 
Board believes that a valid and desirable pattern of devel- 
opment for the Town is one that maintains as far as possi- 
ble its rural characteristics through low overall density 
of development and preservation of connected open space 
areas for conservation, recreation and esthetic purposes. 



86 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



2. Role of Planning . Lincoln is situated in a 
growing metropolitan area. Today no other town so close 
to Boston offers a comparable living environment. Lincoln 
must expect that its future will be affected by the prob- 
lems of the growing metropolitan area of which it is a 
part. If the desirable features of Lincoln are to be con- 
served for the future, it will not suffice to stand pat or 
merely to resist change. Rather Lincoln must anticipate 
future pressures, plan creative responses and act imagina- 
tively and decisively to effect solutions favorable to the 
Town. It is also essential that the Board work closely 
with and enlist the cooperation of the other Town Boards 

so that programs of action may be practical and widely sup- 
ported. 

3. Open Spac e . The existence of large connected 
tracts of open land of all kinds - woods, fields and 
swamps - has been an outstanding characteristic of Lincoln. 
Most of this open land is privately held; the use made of 
it by the Town's citizens for recreation, conservation and 
the simple enjoyment of beholding it, has existed by the 
courtesy and generosity of its private owners. We believe 
that if the Town is to continue to enjoy these benefits in 
the face of the rising value of land a reasonable minimum 
of such land must be acquired by the Town or semi-public 
agencies. Opportunities for such land acquisition will 

be substantially gone within ten years and we may have as 
few as five years in which to secure the Town's needs. 

4. Fire Protection . The Planning Board establishes 
the specific design and development requirements for any 
subdivision through application of the standards in its 
Rules and Regulations. The Board has adopted the policy 
of requiring installation of water mains and their connect- 
ion to the Town supply in any new subdivisions that may be 
presented. We believe that the application of this policy 
will result in improved fire protection and a better fire 
insurance rating for the whole Town. 

B. ACTIVITIES 

During the past year, the subjects of particular plan- 
ning activity have included: 

1. Town Finance and Land Use Survey . Jointly with 
the Board of Selectmen, the Planning Board has been pur- 
suing a study to determine the probable future development 
of the Town and the effects on Town expenses and revenues 
of such development. This survey will analyze the present 

87 



PLANNING BOARD 



trends of development, and, in addition, alternative de- 
velopment patterns, such as creating a degree of non- 
residential development, or varying residential density. 
In guiding this work, the normally close working relation- 
ship between the Planning Board and the Board of Selectmen 
has been strengthened by the establishment of a Steering 
Committee, consisting of two members from each board, to 
establish the policy framework for the Survey. 

The services of a noted planning firm, Adams, Howard 
and Opperman have been engaged for support in this survey 
and, pursuant to the vote of $4,000 at the 1963 Annual Town 
Meeting, application for Federal Planning Assistance has 
been made. The survey is being supported by the activi- 
ties of three committees of citizens, - the Residential 
Committee, the Industr ial -Commercial Committee, and the 
Conservation-Recreation Committee. We anticipate that 
this survey will be completed in one year and that the re- 
sulting town board recommendations will provide the basis 
for Town actions. 

2. Land Acquisition . The Conservation-Recreation 
Study now being conducted as an aspect of the Town Finance 
and Land Use Survey will, we expect, provide the basis for 
a land acquisition program by the Town. Events have not 
waited for the completion of this survey, however, and we 
are now faced with the loss of a large, uniquely useful 
piece of land in the center of the North Lincoln popula- 
tion area. This forty-five acre tract on Route 2, be- 
tween Brooks Road and Bedford Road, together with an ad- 
joining twenty-acre swamp, contains the source of Elm 
Brook which flows north through the Park. The area offers 
the potentiality for water recreation development; the 
brook valley is an attractive hiking-riding area, and the 
adjacent higher ground is easily adaptable to playing 
fields. In addition, we believe that although these par- 
ticular uses would require about half of the land, the 
Town would be wise to purchase the entire property. The 
balance would serve as a land reserve for other needs whose 
specific nature are not now obvious. We believe this is 
wise because future needs for land are virtually impossi- 
ble to fill once land has been developed. Accordingly we 
are recommending the purchase of this parcel and an ad- 
jacent area of swamp land. We anticipate that in the 
next few years the Town will be asked to make several sim- 
ilar purchases of land in other parts of the Town. 

3. Cluster Zoning . The Board is presenting for 
Town action a cluster zoning by-law. The purpose is to 

88 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



allow more flexible design of subdivisions within the 
present density standards. The Town will benefit from 
the reduction in length of new roads to be served, and the 
consolidation of open space. Approval which must be ob- 
tained from the Board of Appeals for each cluster zoning 
application permits use of the technique only when appro- 
priate to the land and in the interest of the Town. 

4. Open Space Conservation Districts . The Valley 
Pond Trustees placed the Valley Pond shores and brook in 
the C-Open Space Conservation District pursuant to the 
vote of the 1963 Annual Town Meeting. For the future, 
developers of the Todd Pond subdivision have agreed to 
placing the green belt areas, including the pond, in the 

C District after completion of road and waterway construc- 
tion . 

5. South Lincoln . The Town voted the necessary 
land purchase and rezoning to provide for connecting Lewis 
Street to the proposed relocation of Lincoln Road south- 
west of the railroad tracks, and to create additional B-2 
Service Business District in that area. 

6. Historic District . The Board has asked the 
Lincoln Historical Society to study the possibility of 
creating an historic district in the Lincoln Center area. 
The Society has obliged by appointing a committee of mem- 
bers for the purpose. 

C. STATISTICAL SUMMARY 

The following subdivisions were approved by the 
Board in 1963: 

George Harrison, approximately 11 acres on South 
Great Road, into 3 lots; 

Stella Giles, approximately 23 acres on South Great 
Road, into 6 lots; 

The Lincoln Associates, approximately 93 acres on 
Lincoln Road, into 32 lots (Todd Pond); 

Alvin Levin, approximately 21 acres on Old Winter 
Street, into 4 lots; 

John E. Moore, Trustee, Emerson Realty Trust, approx- 
imately 3 acres of land on Sandy Pond Road, into 2 lots, 
a portion of these lots lying within the boundaries of the 



89 



PLANNING BOARD 



Town of Concord. 

The following preliminary subdivision plan was re- 
ceived by the Board in 1963: 

Anthony DiPerna, et als, approximately 45 acres of 
land on the Cambridge Turnpike, into 21 lots. 



The Planning Board extends its appreciation to the 
many citizens who have given their time and energy to the 
study committees on the Land Use and Town Finance Survey, 
to the Lincoln League of Women Voters for providing a 
forum for discussion of town planning, and to the many 
citizens whose alert attention makes us aware that the 
Town is interested in planning and cognizant of its Plan- 
ning Board's performance. 



90 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

William N. Swift, Chairman 
Alan McClennen 
Henry B. Hoover 
James Jagger 
Hans Van Leer 

J. Lewis Cunningham, Associate Member 
Betty L. Lang, Associate Member 

Hearings were held on fourteen petitions to the 
Board during the year 1963. Set forth below is a summary 
of the petitions; 

Petition filed by Miss Caroline Ehlert for a variance 
to allow her to subdivide her property on Farrar Road and 
establish two non-conforming building lots. Variance 
granted . 

Petition filed by the Massachusetts Audubon Society 
for permission to construct a day camp building in a resi- 
dential area. Permission granted. 

Petition filed by Norman F. Brisson for renewal of 
permission to store equipment in sand pit off North Great 
Road. Renewal granted. 

Petition filed by Wes-Lex Corporation for a variance 
to allow a distance of less than 250 feet through building 
from side lot line to side lot line on Lot #14, Stonehedge. 
Variance granted. 

Petition filed by Grace Dougherty, et al , for per- 
mission to establish a lot containing 41,000 square feet 
with house thereon on Old Winter Street. Permission 
granted . 

Petition filed by Lincoln Associates for a variance 
to allow a lot size of less than 80,000 square feet on Lot 
18, Todd Pond sub-division. Variance granted. 

Petition filed by E. William Seeckts for a variance 
to allow an additional bedroom and full bath under Section 
5-A-l of the Zoning By-Laws. Petition granted. 

Petition of Thomas McNulty for permission to construct 
a private stable and paddock on his property on Weston Road. 

91 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Permission granted. 

Petition of Charles Malone of Waltham for a permit to 
erect a nursing home, as provided in Section V of the Lin- 
coln Zoning By-Law, on his property located off Tower Road 
in Lincoln. Permission denied. 

Petition of Raymond J. Maher for a variance to allow 
construction of a one-story garage within 20 feet of the 
easterly side lot line of his property on Old Sudbury Road. 
Variance granted. 

Petition of Lincoln Associates for a variance to per- 
mit the installation and operation of an underground fuel 
oil system in their Todd Pond sub-division off Lincoln Road 
Variance granted. 

Petition of Robert Curran Associates for permission 
to remove excess loam from sub-division on Linway Road in 
Lincoln. Permission denied. 

Petition of Builders* Club of Lincoln, Inc. for per- 
mission to use the building on Lincoln Road in South Lin- 
coln, formerly known as the South School, for Masonic meet- 
ings by the Soley Lodge, A. F. & A. M. Permission 
granted . 

Petition of Bertram Foust for a variance to allow con- 
struction of an addition to his home on Juniper Ridge Road 
which would come within 14 feet of the right of way of 
said road. Variance granted. 



92 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

William M. Dean, Building and Wiring Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing Inspector 

Building Permits issued during 1963: 



New residential buildings 

Alterations and additions 

Swimming pool 

Demolish building 

Renew permit 

FEES COLLECTED 

Plumbing Permits issued during 
1963 : 

FEES COLLECTED 

Wiring Permits issued during 
1963 : 

FEES COLLECTED 



22 
35 

1 
1 
1 



42 



62 



$839 .80 



$354.00 



$320 .50 



HARTWELL SCHOOL BUILDING ADDITION COMMITTEE 

William N. Swift, Chairman 
Gerard Henderson 
Helen Gilfoy 
Eugene Mellish 

The Hartwell School Building Addition Committee sub- 
mits herewith its final report. 

The building has been completed and accepted by the 
School Committee. It is recommended that the balance in 
the account be returned to surplus. 



93 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Stuart B. Avery 

Alan McClennen 

Russell P. Mahan, Chairman 

The problem of rusty water, particularl 
Lincoln area, has become more acute than eve 
Analysis of the Fire Underwriters* Report al 
that some of the old water mains are probabl 
by rust. In recent months the Water Commis 
made an intensive investigation to try to de 
best and most economical solution to this pr 
ing of the hydrants and force pumping of the 
made any permanent improvement, and in some 
aggravated the problem in seemingly unrelate 
system . 



y in the South 
r before, 
so indicated 
y obstructed 
sioners have 
termine the 
oblem. Flush- 
mains has not 
instances has 
d parts of the 



A program of mechanically cleaning approximately 
20,000 feet of mains is proposed for this Spring, and an 
accelerated program of replacement of the substandard 4- 
inch mains is planned. In the recent past the Water De- 
partment has in large measure only made replacements to 
the extent that Water Department revenue would allow, and 
borrowing has been held to a minimum. In the near future 
we must face increased borrowing if we are to have a modern 
and efficient water system. 

Fourteen hundred feet of eight inch cement asbestos 
pipe and new hydrants were installed on Tower Road to re- 
place the old four inch cast iron main which remained on 
that line. This construction, which was paid for by 
Water Department revenue, completes an important "loop" in 
the system. Fire hoses that were purchased 5 jointly by 
the Water Department and the Fire Department were used to 
provide temporary service to the residents of the area 
during the construction. In addition to Tower Road, ap- 
proximately one mile of new mains were added to the system 
with the connections to the Todd Pond subdivision and the 
water main extensions in the Demone subdivision. 

The preliminary survey of the Tower Road well site 
has been completed. More detailed plans and a program 
for land acquisition and site engineering will be developed 
during the coming year. 

During the year 1963 the Board of Water Commissioners 
held twenty-three meetings and attended other meetings with 



94 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



Selectmen and Planning Boards. The Water Commissioners 
also made flow and pressure tests on the system, visited 
construction sites, and spent considerable time in reorgan 
izing and bringing up to date some of the old records on 
mains, gates, hydrants, etc. Mr. Gilbert, our Superin- 
tendent, and his helper are to be congratulated for their 
interest, energy, and the many late hours devoted to the 
operation of the Water Department. 



WATER DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 
1963 



In use December 31, 1963 Added in 1963 



Pipe 



33.09 miles 



1.09 miles 



Hydrants 



267 



13 



Stop Gates 



315 



16 



Bl o w-of f s 



27 







Serv ices 



1066 



16 



Meter s 



1062 



11 



Services renewed 



8 



Range of pressure in 
mains 



40 - 100 P.S. I. 



Total gallons pumped 
in 1963 



127, 786 , 000 



Increase over 1962 



15,670, 800 



95 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John B. French 
John Quincy Adams 
Paul Brooks 
James DeNormandie 
Mary Drury 
Robert Lemire 

The year was an active one for the Conservation Com- 
mission in its efforts to keep abreast of - and hopefully 
at times ahead of - events and pressures which seek to 
develop the remaining open spaces in the town in ways 
which detract from the characteristics of the town which 
we believe the town has indicated it wishes to preserve. 
While people express these characteristics in different 
ways and with differing emphasis, they certainly include 
the preservation of the surrounding fields, streams, ponds 
and woods in their natural state, in order to retain the 
"rural" and "unhurried" aspect of the town. To accom- 
plish this preservation poses difficult problems of balan- 
cing the desire to minimize current spending with some 
attempt at longer range forecasting of what will be the 
result to the town of too frugal a present policy. 

Another important consideration with which we are 
concerned is the preservation of swamps and low lands as 
water storage areas in order to protect and maintain the 
water table and prevent too speedy water run-off. 

We have worked closely with other town boards in this 
effort, notably the Planning Board and Selectmen in the 
DiPerna land acquisition project - what is hoped will be 
the first of a series of acquisition of a "land reserve". 
We have also initiated a program of contacting persons in 
different sections of the town to act as local advisors in 
helping us keep alert to possible adverse land-use changes 
and to act as co-or dinator s of any neighborhood projects. 
It is hoped to expand this program in the coming year. 

We are pleased to report that in late 1963 and early 
1964 approximately four acres of land bordering Sandy Pond 
have been most generously donated to the town by Deborah 
T. Brown, David T. Brown and Alan T. Brown. 



96 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



Raymond P. Maher , Superintendent 



The Department fin 
year on a number of the 
unusual amount of drain 
Pond Road where surface 
spring were badly affec 
ble. In some instance 
is, perhaps, difficult 
the saving in time used 
what it was five years 
cover a route in consid 
good condition. Each 
re-conditioning of the 
fewer break downs and m 



ished maj 

Town * s r 

age on Le 

cond i t io 

ted by fr 

s old 1 in 

for peopl 

for pate 

ago. Be 

er abl y le 

year the 

highway e 

ore effic 



or construction during the 
oads. This involved an 
xington Road and on Beaver 
ns during the winter and 
ost and a high water ta- 
es had to be replaced. It 
e in general to realize 
hing now, as opposed to 
yond this, a snow plow can 
ss time when a road is in 
shop makes gains in the 
quipment which results in 
ient operation. 



The addition of a general purpose tractor with front 
end loader and mower would relieve seasonable pressures 
tremendously. At present the demands for the Michigan are 
such that all too frequently work has to go undone or is 
done inefficiently for want of a second loading unit. Such 
a machine has many uses beyond that of just loading (mow- 
ing, snow removal, grading, posthole digging), plus offer- 
ing a factor of safety should the Michigan break down. 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

James DeNormandie 
H. Arnold MacLean 
Robert A. Spence, Chairman 

The grading in the new section has been completed and 
lots will be laid out and the record maps revised. The 
usual routine maintenance was performed. 

The number of interments in 1963 was seventeen. 

The Commissioners wish to express their appreciation 
for the assistance and cooperation given them by officers 
and employees of the Town of Lincoln. 



97 



LANDSCAPE COMMITTEE 



LANDSCAPE COMMITTEE 

Albert S. Brooks 
Elizabeth H. Doherty 
Richard J. Eaton 
David L. Garrison 
Mabel H. Todd 
Max M. Mason, Chairman 

The primary concerns of the Landscape Committee 
during the past year have been maintaining and mulching 
new planting, observing effectiveness of Inoculations on 
numerous town elms, maintenance of roadsides, and the ex- 
tensive trimming of trees by the Edison Company. 

The committee acts as an advisory body only and has 
experienced some difficulty in getting its ideas carried 
out. Albert Brooks has been instrumental in doing this 
work and hopefully will be able to devote more time to it 
in the future. 

The problem of roadsides has been of particular con- 
cern to the committee. Herbicides have been used in order 
to prevent vegetation from narrowing the traveled way as 
well as blocking snow removal. This practice has created 
unsightly browning off during the latter part of the sum- 
mer, but has been deemed necessary due to the cost of re- 
moving the vegetation by other methods. It is believed, 
however, once the vegetation has been brought under con- 
trol that more sightly methods such as mowing and hand 
pruning can prevent its return. 

It is still too early to accurately appraise the value 
of inoculating a few selected town owned elms against dis- 
ease. The apparent arresting of disease in some trees has 
been noted however. 

For the coming year, the Committee is particularly 
interested in the landscape development of Ballfield Road 
and the school area. 



98 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

William M. Preston, Chairman 
Abigail D. Avery, Secretary 
Bradford Cannon 
Donald P. Donaldson 
Margaret Hubbard 
Constantin A. Pertzoff 
William N. Swift 

The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust is a non-profit, 
tax-exempt organization, supported by membership dues and 
by voluntary contributions, whose principal purpose is to 
promote the preservation of the rural character of the 
Town. We work closely with the Town's Conservation Com- 
mission. On December 31, 1963, we owned about 37 acres 
of land in 7 parcels and we had 166 dues-paying members. 
No new land was acquired during the year. 

A major recent activity of the Trust has been that of 
laying out and marking three trails for walking and horse- 
back riding. These are described in a Trail Bulletin sent 
out to all members last May. Additional copies of this 
bulletin may be obtained from the Secretary. 

Financial Report for 1963 
On hand, January 1, 1963 $1,984.07 

Received : 



Membership dues $1,630.00 

Cash gifts 325 .00 



1 ,955 .00 
$3 ,939 .07 



Expend i tur es : 

Middlesex Inst, for Savings: 

Mortgage interest 935.00 

Deed recording fees 115.62 

Printing & mailing 110.20 

1 .160.82 

On Hand, December 31, 1963 $2,778.25 



99 



Schools, Library and Recreation 

TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Alice G. Meriam 
Roland C. Mackenzie 
Morley M. John 

John A. Carley 

Leo A. Palmer 

Edwin M. Cole, Chairman 



(Life Member ) 
(Life Member) 
(School Committee 

Appointee ) 
(Elected by the Town) 
(Selectmen Appointee) 
(Life Member) 



When comment about the missing hand on the Library 
tower clock reached a climax in letters to the Fence 
Viewer, the staff and trustees enjoyed the good-natured 
show of interest, but they were considerably more elated 
about what was going on inside the building. Regular re- 
ports prepared by the hard-working librarians showed that 
after several years of uncommonly rapid rise in the use of 
books, the circulation was not leveling off as might be ex 
pected but continuing to increase. (See the statistical 
summary which follows.) The people of Lincoln take out 
of the Library, per capita per annum, over three times as 
many books as the national average. It seems fair to 
assume that they read them. We are gratified that the 
Library has been able to help satisfy such avid interest. 
The record collection in its first full year has also 
proved popular. 

In other ways the Library plays a part in the life of 
the Town. Lovers of poetry and of Shakespeare meet there. 
The Historical Society has been cataloguing the local his- 
torical documents housed there. The League of Women Vot- 
ers maintains exhibits there. The DeCordova Museum loans 
paintings for the walls, and its own books will be listed 
in the Library catalog, as are those of Drumlin Farm. The 
Lincoln schools notify the Library of reading and reference 
projects - 95% of the books on last summer's school read- 
ing list were represented in the Library collection - and 
School and Library staffs have been meeting regularly to 
work out other ways of coordinating their programs. The 
Friends of the Library, through their dues of one dollar a 
year, made possible this year the evening with Isaac 
Asimov, author of many science and science fiction books, 
Mr. Asimov delighted everyone with his wit and knowledge 
in discussing Science Fact and Science Fiction . The Boy 
Scouts have again strung and removed the Christmas lights 
on the big Library evergreen. The Lincoln police have 
helped with raising and lowering the flag. We hope these 



100 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



examples will suggest still other ways in which the Library 
can be included in Town activities with benefit to all. 

In comparing the Lincoln Library with those of neigh- 
boring towns, one feature stands out in addition to our 
extraordinary circulation of books. That is the compara- 
tively small size of our paid staff. The explanation, 
apart from the efficiency of this staff, is of course our 
volunteers - the envy of every librarian and trustee who 
hears of them. Their loyalty, their dependability, their 
time and skill are gifts to the Town beyond the measure of 
dollars and beyond adequate thanks. 

Another intangible for which the staff and trustees 
are grateful is the warm cooperation of Town boards and 
officers. The Executive Officer of the Selectmen and the 
Town Treasurer and his Assistant in particular have been 
generous with their time, counsel, and specific help with 
problems both large and small. 

All friends of the Library were saddened to learn of 
the passing of Mrs. Edith Farrar, devoted Librarian for 
twenty-seven years before her retirement in 1957. Members 
of her family have made a generous contribution to the 
Library as a memorial to her, and friends have added to 
this fund . 

Dr. Roland Mackenzie completed his twenty-fifth year 
on the board of trustees. Mr. A. Bradlee Emmons retired 
after two very active terms, and the Selectmen appointed 
Mr. Leo Palmer to replace him. 

Recognition from outside during the year included an 
invitation to participate in an exhibit at the Boston Pub- 
lic Library entitled "Public Libraries of Massachusetts**. 
Mrs. Thoma was invited to participate in a panel discussion 
on Censorship sponsored by the Boston Chapter of the Women's 
National Book Association. The other panelists were Tru- 
man Nelson, author of Passion by the Brook , a history of 
Brook Farm, and Professor Kenneth Shaffer, Director of the 
School of Library Science at Simmons College. Simmons Col- 
lege includes the Lincoln Library on its list of those 
recommended to students of Library Science for visitation. 
And our Librarian and Children's Librarian have been sought 
after as speakers and to serve on committees in the region. 

In the five years since the new wing of the building 
opened for use, circulation of adult books has doubled, 
and of children's books, nearly doubled. The program of 

101 



LIBRARY 



renovating and finishing available space to house the 
growing collection of books, periodicals and records has 
continued year by year. In perhaps two years a major 
step may be necessary to finish off the large unused room 
under the Children's Reading Room. 

We remind all citizens that available on request at 
the Library are copies of The Statement of Policy of the 
Lincoln Public Library which explains the objectives and 
purposes of the Library, its* criteria for selection of 
books, its' stand on censorship and other problems and 
procedures of the Library. 















102 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



STAFF OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Librarian : 



Assistant Librarian: 



Children's Librarian 



Library Assistants: 



Part-time typist 
Part-time pages: 



Mrs. Maryalice Thoma 

Mrs. Astrid Donaldson 

Mrs. Helen Kent 

Mrs. Marjorie Cate 
Mrs. Jeanne Healey 
Mrs. Nancy Powell 

(Resigned Jan. 1, 1964) 

Mrs. Mary Belanger 



Janet Bronson 
Mar jorie Cate 
Albert C. England 
Mary Lou Foley 
Dorothy Gajewski 
Kathryn Grason 
Louise Hendrick 
Sandra MacFarland 
Mar lee Meyer 
Cynthia Nystrom 
Margaret Weiss 



VOLUNTEERS 



Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Miss 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 

Mrs 



Robert L. Allen 
Lawrence Anderson 
Edgar E. Barr 
Thomas P. Beal 
Charles A. Bliss 
Anne Marie Blum 
Douglas Burckett 
Ruth Burke 
William H. Butler , 
F. Marsena Butts 
Richard D. Coons 
Thomas Cope 
John D. Crawford 
Bruce Daniels 
Margaret Delling 
James DeNormandie 
Robert Emerson 
Sarah England 
Norman Fradd 
Nathaniel C. Gerson 



II 



Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mr s . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Miss 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 



Will iam Gr im 
Harry Healey 
Edward M. Healy 
Christopher Hurd 
John W. Irwin 
DeWitt John 
Henry B. Kane 
Charles Kindleberger 
R. B. King, Jr. 
Shih Ying Lee 
John W. Lincoln 
Richard Meriam 
Henry Morgan 
Wayne D. Mount 
Jackson Parker 
Sholem Postel 
Anne Rhodes 
Howard Snelling 
Charles H. Stevens 
J. Hardy Stewart 



103 



LIBRARY 



Mrs. Arthur E. Thiessen 
Mrs. Quincy W. Wales 
Mrs. R. Langdon Wales 



Mrs, Henry Warner 

Mrs. Thomas Worthington 

Lincoln Boy Scouts 



PAGES IN TRAINING 



William Butler, III 
Frederic Daniels 
Scott Kennedy 
Ava-Lisa Olsen 



Peter Outten 
Christine Schroeder 
Constance Witherby 



LIST OF DONORS 



Mrs. Archibald Ad kins 

Mrs. Lawrence Anderson 

Mr. Russell Armstrong 

Miss Virginia Armstrong 

Mrs. Stuart Avery 

Mrs. Arthur E. Baggs 

Mr. John Bottino 

Mr. Paul Brooks 

Mrs. David R. Brown 

Miss Ellen Brown 

Mrs. Sec or Browne 

Mrs. Ruth Burke 

Campbell 86 Hall 

Dr. & Mrs. Bradford Cannon 

Mr. John Carley 

Mrs. John Caswell 

Miss Gabrielle Coignet 

Mrs. Paul Cook 

Mr. &, Mrs, Henry Coolidge 

Mrs. Thomas Cope 

Mr. James DeNormandie 

Mrs. Donald Donaldson 

Mrs. Gordon Donaldson 

Mrs. Malcolm Donaldson 

Mr. Richard Eaton 

Mrs. Robert Emerson 

Mrs. Warwick Field 

Miss Olive Floyd 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman Fradd 

Miss Norma Fryatt 

Mrs. Nathaniel Gerson 

Mrs. Norman Hapgood 

Mr. &, Mrs. Roger Harris 

Mrs. Elliott R. Hedge 

Mrs. Frank Hennessey 

Mr. & Mrs. Eliot Hubbard 



Mrs. Allen Jackson 

Miss Jennifer John 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry B. Kane 

Miss Mabel Kelley 

Mr. Charles Kindleberger 

Lincoln Boy Scouts 

Lincoln Garden Club 

Lincoln Girl Scout 

Council 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 

High School 
Mr. Skip Mackenzie 
Mrs. Richard Meriam 
Mrs. James E. Meyer 
Dr. Richard Morgan 
Mrs. Thomas R. Morse 
Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Moss 
Mrs. Mark Naiman 
Miss Ava-Lisa Olsen 
Mrs. William Preston 
Mrs. Harold Priest 
Mrs. Roy Raja 
Rev. Morris Robinson 
Mrs. Alfred P. Rogers 
Mrs. Charles Roth 
Mrs. Charles Satterfield 
Mr. Clement Sawtell 
Rev. Greta Snider 
Mr, & Mrs. George Tarbell 
Mrs. Frederick B. Taylor 
Mr. 86 Mrs. Arthur Thiessen 
Mrs. Eveleth R. Todd 
Mrs. Maryalice Thoma 
Mrs. Robert Vandell 
Mrs. Andrew Wales 
Mrs. Henry Warner 



104 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Mrs. John B. Warner 

WBZ 

Mr. George Wells 

Miss Mary Wheeler 



Mrs. William Williams 
Miss Constance Witherby 
Mrs. Thomas Worthington 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Hours open: Monday, Wednesday &. Friday 

Tuesday, Thursday It Saturday 



10 : 30 to 8 : 30 
10 : 30 to 5 :00 



(Closed legal holidays and 
Saturdays in July and August) 

STATISTICS, 1963 

January 1 - December 31, 1963 



General 



New members 
Total membership 

Am ount of fines 
collected 

Number of days open 

Acqui sit ions 

Books purchased 
Bo oks received by 
gift 

Total acquisitions, 

1963 
Inventory, 1962 

Books discarded or 
lost 



Recor d s : 

Inventory 1962 

Purchases 

Gifts 



224 
2 , 040 

$2,111.85 
290 



2,178 
634 



2,812 
20 . 800 
23 , 612 

535 
23 , 087 



132 
81 
50 

263 



105 



Circulation 



LIBRARY 



Adult non-fiction 
Adult fiction 
Period icals 
Records 
Juvenile 



13,911 

15,849 

1 ,593 

1,120 

33.811 






1963 Total Circulation 
1962 Total Circulation 



66,284 
59.226 



Increase over 1962 



7,058 



\ 






106 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Ruth M. Burk 
Mary Jane Butler 
John W . Fisher 
Wal ter I . Key es 
Charles E. Jennings 
Albert E. Nelson 



Nancy K. Outten 
Joan A. Ogden 
Fred P. Walkey 
Arlene B. Wirsig 
J. Bertram Kessel, 
C ha i r man 



Recreation programs sponsored by the Committee were: 

men's Softball, men and boys* basketball, adult tennis 

tournament, and the five-week summer playground for boys 
and girls. 

Softball League 

The Softball League included six teams, Geophysics 
and Fire and Police having been added to the existing four 
teams, North Lincoln, Nike Base, Regionals, and Tower Road. 

Sixty games were played during the regular season 
from May 5th through August 1st, and four additional play- 
off games completed the schedule during the week of August 
5th. 

The North Lincoln team was the pennant winner, fol- 
lowed by Tower Road, Regionals, Geophysics, Nike Base, and 
Fire and Police in that order. Tower Road swept two games 
to win the playoff series. 

As in the past, the Softball League All-Stars played 
their Concord rivals as part of the Fourth of July program, 
losing this year by a decisive margin. John W. Fisher 
served as softball commissioner. 

Summer Playground 

Personnel . Mr. Albert "Bud" Reed directed the pro- 
gram. Assisting him as senior leaders were: Emmett Inger- 
soll, Janet A. Olmsted, Paul W. Hitchcock, Ronald Trudeau, 
Harriet Butz and Frances Cibel; as a junior leader, Janet 
Hankey. Craft instructors were: Carolyn I. MacLennan and 
Janet Epstein. In charge of tennis was Chloe Bouscaren, 
assisted by James Miser. 

Serving as Program Aide Trainees were: Janet Chisholm, 
Dorothy Gajewski, Kathryn Grason, Andrea Loewenstein, Da- 
vid Palmer, Kathy Parker, Rosemary Farley, Bruce Foust and 
Ed Wells . 

107 



RECREATION 



Program . Activities included: crafts, games and 
sports, dramatics, music, dance, nature, gymnastics, ten- 
nis, swimming, and campcraft. Themes for each of the 
five weeks were: Gold Rush; J. F. K. ; International Arts 
Festival; Land, Sea, Air, and Space; and Gay 90 Teas. 

Special events included: four baseball games with 
Weston, two bicycle trips to Sudbury, two hiking and fish- 
ing trips to Farrar Pond, cookouts every Wednesday, Friday 
morning entertainment to which parents were invited, an 
overnight campout for girls, marble tournament, archery 
tournament, bicycle rodeo, doll carriage parade, Silver 
Spurs dancers from the State of Washington, the Boston 
Children's Theatre Stagemobile presenting the Pied Piper 
and The Magic Cure, costume contests, lashing and bridge- 
making, story-telling, puppetry, and automobile mechanics. 

Attendance on the playground included 112 five and 
six year olds; 119 seven and eight year olds; 114 nine and 
ten year olds; 71 eleven and twelve year olds; 18 thirteen, 
fourteen and fifteen year olds, for a total of 434, Aver- 
age weekly attendance was 240, with a first week high of 
334 . 

The children and the staff produced a weekly newspaper 
called "The Playground Press" in which or iginal .essays , 
poems, cross-word puzzles, and biographical sketches ap- 
peared . 

The Program Aide Trainees were given pr e-playgr ound 
training, a session at the end of the third week, and a 
playground manual to assist them with their daily on-the- 
job experience with their adult supervisor. A record was 
kept for each PAT so that a varied experience was assured 
as well as serving as a basis for the next supervisor to 
help the PAT progress. 

The tennis program, available to children fifth 
through twelfth grades, attracted 134 participants. Teams 
for junior and senior boys and senior girls were organized 
for the New England Junior Tennis League and the Junior 
Wightman Cup League. A Lincoln Invitational Tournament 
and a Parent-Child Round Robin contest also took place. 
The children were given the Leighton Tennis Test and placed 
in three groups: beginners, intermediates, and advanced. 
Thirty children received awards for successful completion 
of one or more tests. 

The swimming program drew our quota of 240 children 
from grades two through twelve plus many on the waiting 

108 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



list. Classes at Walden Pond sponsored by the Concord Red 
Cross were held for beginners, intermediates, swimmers, 
junior life savers, and senior life savers. 

Mrs. Stanley S. Wirsig was in charge of the summer 
playground and was assisted by Mrs. George W. Burk. Mrs. 
Ophair Caras organized the swimming program. Mrs. Louis 
C. Farley, Jr. organized schedules and transportation for 
the youth tennis program. 

Adult Tennis Tournament 



There were 147 individuals or teams entered in the 
seven events, and in the five weeks of the tournament 140 
matches were played. The winners were: 



Men's A Singles - 

Men's B Singles - 

Men's A Doubles - 

Men's B Doubles - 

Mixed Doubles - 

Ladies' Singles - 

Ladies* Doubles - 



Duncan M. Nelson 

Dunbar Lockwood , Jr. 

Frederick P. Walkey &, 

Robert L. Niles 

John A. Pike & 

William M. Rand, Jr. 

Jean and Duncan M. Nelson 

Louise Kusleika 

Louise Kusleika &, 

Barbara Sisson 



The Tennis Committee again presented a tennis clinic 
and demonstration for several hundred spectators and play- 
ers of all ages on the 4th of July. Mr. Harrison Row- 
botham, President of the New England Lawn Tennis Associa- 
tion, was one of the demonstrators. Mr. Frederick P. 
Walkey organized the tennis clinic and the adult tennis 
tournament . 

James Miser maintained the tennis courts during July 
and August . 

Basketball Program 

The basketball program for fifth through twelfth 
grade boys began on Decem.ber 7th and continues throughout 
the winter on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p. m. 

The men's basketball program meets Tuesday evenings 
at 7:30. About twelve men have attended each week. 

Albert E. Nelson and Walter I. Keyes are in charge of 
the basketball programs and have been assisted by Leo 
Algeo, Francis Hankey, and Robert Gray. 



109 



RECREATION 

Ice Skating 

Ice skating facilities were investigated by Charles 
E. Jennings and Walter I. Keyes. Trips were made to near 
by towns to study their skating facilities and discussions 
were held with members of the Conservation Service con- 
cerning suitable areas for grading and flooding. It is 
the desire of the committee to have several areas main- 
tained by the Town to fill this long needed void in the 
recreation program. 

Ski ing 

A ski school for mothers and children is planned for 
four Wednesdays starting on January 15, 1964. Directed 
by Mrs. Betsy Van Curan of Wayland, the school will con- 
duct free morning sessions for mothers with the understand 
ing that they will help with the children's lessons. The 
afternoon sessions are for children first through eighth 
grades with classes organized according to ability. 
Through the courtesy of the James DeNormandies . their 
slope on Trapelo Road will be available for the four Wed- 
nesdays. The program will be self-sustaining. Mrs. 
William B. Butler and Mrs. Stanley S. Wirsig are in charge 
of registration and arrangements. 

Finances 

The committee's appropriation for 1963 totaled $7430. 
The expenditures totaled $6601.78. The income from swim- 
ming, crafts, tennis, and the Stagemobile programs totaled 



$2087.79 (last year's income was $1437.26). 



Th 



us 



the 



cost of the year's recreation program was $4513.99. 



RECREATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Gardner Jackson, Jr. 
J. Bertram Kessel 
Robert A. Lemire 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 
Albert E. Nelson 
David Webster 
Lucy J. Young 

The report of this Committee, which was established 
after the last annual meeting, will be circulated separate 
ly to the Town prior to the March town meeting. 



110 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Annette E. Gras 
Christopher W. Hurd 
Robert L. Filbin, ex-officio 
John D. Crawford, Chairman 

The Scholarship Fund Committee is charged with the 
responsibility "to aid deserving Lincoln children to con- 
tinue their formal education beyond high school". In ex- 
ercising this responsibility, the Committee is directed 
by the trust instrument to consider not only scholastic 
achievement and available financial resources but also the 
applicant's general character and promise for the future. 

Reports from current and past recipients of scholar- 
ship aid give the town reason to feel more than a little 
pride in these young people. Their course selection in- 
dicates maturity of judgment; their scholastic achievement 
has been high; they have been participants in a wide vari- 
ety of important extra-curricular activities of campus 
life. Because of these fine attributes many students, 
dependent on Lincoln Scholarship aid in their freshman 
year, have won college scholarships for subsequent years. 

Their success reflects favorably on our Lincoln 
schools. Further, in becoming independent of the Lincoln 
Scholarship Fund, they free its limited resources to be of 
aid to a larger number of freshmen and others whose need 
i s greater . 

The Scholarship Committee weighs equally the needs of 
those seeking practical education with those of the stu- 
dents in the liberal arts. A major consideration in each 
case is whether the student's choice of college is appro- 
priate for his or her needs. A dilemma has sometimes 
arisen in relation to an applicant's desire to attend a 
special college at a distance. When applicants have been 
well able to defend their choice, the Committee has sup- 
ported them. In reviewing the results of this policy, it 
has been a source of gratification to find what important 
rewards have accrued to scholarship recipients able to 
work in the particular environment and with the faculty of 
their choice. 

In 1963, formal applications for aid were received 
from seven students. Awards were made to five, the re- 
maining two applicants receiving assistance from other 
sources. The number and total of awards were less than 






111 



SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 



the Committee's estimate based on projection from prior 
years. The explanation for this appears related to the 
fine work of Mr. Paul Vernon and his staff in the Guidance 
Department at the Regional High School. Last year, he 
and his associates began much earlier than usual an ap- 
praisal of the financial needs of the students for their 
continued education. It seems likely that both the re- 
duction in number of scholarship applications and the very 
realistic approach in their preparation were the results 
of this effort . 

Although the number of awards made last year was less 
than forecast, this trend is not likely to continue. Fur- 
thermore, the average amount of aid needed by individual 
applicants continues to show the gradual increase which 
has been evident for several years. Already, a large 
number of colleges have announced $300 to $500 increases 
in tuition for next year. These considerations suggest 
to us that the role of the Scholarship Fund will be a very 
vital one to the high school graduates of 1964. 

In the Committee's report of a year ago, mention was 
made of the diminishing response of the townspeople to the 
annual appeal for funds to carry on the work of the Scholar 
ship Fund. It was most gratifying in the current year to 
find the number of contributors, 159, and the amount given, 
$1,700, greater than at any time in the past. Over $700 
accrued to the fund from the fourth of July parking pro- 
ceeds and generous contributions were received from the 
4-H Horse Club, the Lincoln School Association and the Lin- 
coln Grange. Substantial sums were also given in memory 
of Mrs. Myrtle Snyder and Matthew H. Doherty. To all 
those whose interest and generosity gave vitality to the 
Lincoln Scholarship Fund, our sincere thanks. 



112 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Paul Brooks 

Margaret Wood 

Thomas Winship, Chairman 

The 70th year of the Bemis Lecture series for Lincoln 
residents seemed to place the accent on nature and adven- 
ture, but it did wind up on an off-beat note. 

The season opened with a delightful talk by Dr. Fair- 
field Osborn, the well-known naturalist and President of 
the New York Zoological Society. He talked about some of 
the rarities in the Bronx Zoo. The Town Hall didn't have 
an empty seat for the Osborn talk November 15, 1963. 

The next guest made Bemis Lecture history. The 
speaker was Joy Adamson, author of the best sellers, BORN 
FREE, LIVING FREE, FOREVER FREE. So many residents 
turned out for Mrs. Adamson's illustrated talk that Trustee 
Peg Wood had to announce that there would be two lectures 
and showings that night. Remarkably, enough parents and 
children returned at 9:45 that evening to again fill the 
Town Hall to capacity. 

The last two guests scheduled for the 1963-64 season 
are Woodrow Wilson Sayre for February 28 to talk on his 
assault on Mt . Everest and singer Jackie Washington on 
Ap r i 1 10. 

Because of the consistently large crowds attending 
Bemis lectures this year, the Trustees, at the suggestion 
of the Board of Selectmen, decided to schedule some lect- 
ures in the Smith School auditorium. 



113 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Dana W. Atchley, President 

The major activities of the DeCordova Museum are de- 
tailed below in the report of its Executive Director, Mr. 
Frederick Walkey. The Directors continue to be impressed 
by the enthusiastic and skillful administration of the 
Museum now completing its fourteenth year of operation. 
The impact of the Museum on the surrounding area grows 
daily. In particular, the new series of exhibits on New 
England Art has established the Museum as an important 
nucleus for the larger New England art community. 

The Directors continue their efforts devoted toward 
the several-fold increase in the Museum's educational 
facilities. The design of a new wing which will accom- 
plish this aim while simultaneously relieving crowded ex- 
hibition space is scheduled to go out for bids early this 
spring. These plans have been drawn up by Mr, J, Q, 
Adams, Architect, working in close concert with a Building 
Committee led by Mr, John A, Pike and assisted by Mr, John 
C, Haartz, Jr., Mr, Andrew M, Wales, and in its early 
phases by Mr, Ernest P, Neumann and at times by various 
members of the Board, 

Approximately half of the monies estimated for this 
addition have been raised or pledged. Arrangements have 
been made to borrow the balance required from the De Cor- 
dova Trust at an interest and liquidation rate similar to 
that used by the Museum in its borrowings at the time of 
its initial remodeling in 1950, It is hoped that con- 
tinued contributions will be received that can be applied 
to reduce the amount of proposed borrowings. 

Essential to the above have been the capable efforts 
of many of the Museum Associates working under the 2nd 
Decade Fund Capital Gifts Committee, chaired by Mr, A. Brad 
lee Emmons, assisted by Mrs. Elliott Hedge, Mr. Sumner 
Smith, Mr. Harry R. Healey and Mr, Francis S. Andrews. 

The Board members wish to extend their thanks to the 
many citizens of Lincoln who contributed so generously 
during 1963 both in time and money. Further we wish to 
extend our appreciation to Mr. J. Quincy Adams, who re- 
signed as President in the spring of 1963 after providing 
many years of devoted and capable leadership to the Museum 
and to Mr, George Wells for his many years of excellent ser 
vice as a Director, 



114 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Frederick P. Walkey 

Exhibitions 

In recent years, the Museum has been originating more 
of its own exhibitions and booking fewer traveling exhibi- 
tions. At the same time, we have reduced the total num- 
ber of exhibitions presented annually and have concentrated 
on the presentation in depth of a relatively few major 
shows . 

Twelve different exhibitions were presented in 1963. 
Of these, only one was a traveling show and the rest were 
initiated and organized by our own staff. Detailed, il- 
lustrated catalogues were compiled and printed at the 
Museum in connection with five shows, and every important 
exhibition was supplemented by gallery talks, lectures, 
teachers' meetings and related educational activities for 
school children, college students and adult groups. 

The DeCordova Museum has always focused attention on 
New England art. This policy was underscored in 1963 by 
the one-man shows given sculptor Thomas Morin of Providence 
and painter Robert Neuman of Boston and by a new series of 
exhibitions entitled "New England Art in Six Parts". The 
first two parts in the New England Art series, "Part I, 
Drawings", and "Part II, Paintings", were presented in the 
spring and fall of 1963, and the remaining four are sched- 
uled at intervals through 1964 and 1965. The entire 
series will present, for the first time in the history of 
New England art, a comprehensive survey of the best con- 
temporary painting, sculpture, graphics, and drawing in the 
six New England states. 

Further emphasizing the Museum's interest in New Eng- 
land art was the display, during the summer months, of a 
substantial part of our own collection. Many of New Eng- 
land's outstanding artists are represented in the prints, 
paintings, drawings and sculpture which the Museum has 
acquired over the years through its own modest purchases 
and through the generosity of many donors. 

Other 1963 exhibitions presented a sweeping review of 
20th century art in work ranging from the cubism of the 
early 1900 f s, through the social realism of the depression 
years, to the "pop" art of the sixties. "New Experiments" 
our big spring show, introduced some of New York's most 
controversial "new realists" and "pop" artists to local 

115 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



viewers. Inspiring nostalgia in some gallery visitors 
and fresh appreciation in others, the familiar styles of 
Reginald Marsh, Thomas Benton and John Stuart Curry were 
represented in a small but choice exhibition of American 
prints of the 1920's and 1930*s borrowed from the Wiggin 
Collection of the Boston Public Library. And in the final 
major exhibition of 1963, "Paintings from the Collection 
of William H. Lane", viewers had an opportunity to see 
classic examples of work by such 20th century masters as 
Feininger, Dove, Hartley, Hofmann, O'Keefe, Marin and 
Sheeler . 

Two special exhibitions lent an international flavor 
to the schedule in 1963. One hundred and sixty earrings 
from countries all over the world were displayed in Febru- 
ary and March. Borrowed from the collection of Olga 
Pertzoff , the exhibition contained an intriguing variety 
of ornaments in materials ranging from walrus bone and 
tigers' teeth used by primitive craftsmen to sophisticated 
designs in silver by Alexander Calder. In July, an ex- 
hibition of Indonesian arts and crafts was installed in 
the upstairs galleries; including masks, daggers, puppets, 
woodcarvings , batiks, and paintings from the islands of 
Sumatra, Bali and Java, the exhibit was of particular in- 
terest to youngsters who were studying the culture of Indo- 
nesia in our Summer Outdoor Program. 

Museum Classes 

The total enrollment in Museum classes in 1963 was 
almost 1400; our students came from fifty-one different 
towns in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 

A few new classes were added to the customary program 
of instruction in the visual and lively arts. Among the 
most popular new offerings for adults was a class in sculp- 
ture, or carving, offered only in the summer term. The 
class met on the lawn under a big tent where students could 
carve with abandon on large blocks of white pine, limestone 
and Philippine mahogany. 

Arthur Mazmanian, who recently joined the Museum 
staff as graphic designer, started a new class in "Design 
Experiments" this fall for adults, and Shirley Randall 
launched a new "Actors* Workshop" for teenagers, 

Under the direction of Alice Brunton, the Museum's 
Scholarship Program for talented high school students con- 
tinued unchanged from previous years. Fifty-two students 
from seven nearby high schools were selected by their Art 



116 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Supervisors to come to the Museum one afternoon a week for 
advanced art instruction. 

Again last summer, the Museum conducted special 
classes for teenagers, a creative arts program for child- 
ren in the primary grades, and an intensive outdoor pro- 
gram in the arts for youngsters in grades 3 to 7. Activi- 
ties in the outdoor program were based on a study of the 
culture of Indonesia in the first three-week term and on 
the "High Middle Ages" of Europe in the second. 

Art History Lectures for Schools 

During the school year, two members of the Museum 
staff presented illustrated lectures on a multitude of sub- 
jects within the general field of art history for students 
in elementary and high schools throughout Greater Boston. 
Designed to supplement the study of history, English, art 
and languages, the lectures covered topics ranging from 
"Paleolithic Art" to "'Ar t and Architecture in the Soviet 
Union". Teachers who have used the lectures in their 
classes are enthusiastic about the results. They say 
that this visual presentation adds an important dimension 
to the teaching process and that it helps students to un- 
derstand and retain the material their teachers have pre- 
sented. The Museum's Slide Library has been steadily en- 
larged in recent years, and it now constitutes a major 
educational resource. Our lecturers have at their dis- 
posal excellent slide reproductions of the important works 
of art and architecture in countries all over the world. 

The Art History Lecture Program, which began as an 
experiment to see if Art History could effectively be in- 
troduced into secondary and elementary school education, 
has now moved out of the experimental phase. Many schools 
have come to depend on these lectures, and most schools 
pay for at least part of their cost. This is a pilot pro- 
gram which has proved itself locally and which could set 
an example nationally. In recognition of its present and 
potential significance, the Museum has recently been award- 
ed a grant of $2,600 to improve and broaden the program in 
1964. 

Art Teachers* Seminars 

Meetings for Art Teachers and Supervisors were held 
at regular intervals during 1963 under the leadership of 
Linda Johnson of the Museum staff. Representatives from 
the Art Departments of fifteen different schools attended 

117 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



these meetings. They discussed their work, their common 
problems, and the exhibitions on view in the Museum. They 
heard gallery talks by members of the Museum staff and 
occasionally met with the exhibiting artists. After each 
meeting, many of them returned to tour the galleries with 
their students. 

Adventures in Music 

"Adventures in Music** is the organization which the 
Museum sponsors to bring live symphony concerts to children 
in the elementary grades in seven suburban towns. The 
concerts are presented in cooperation with school depart- 
ments in the participating towns, and music teachers in 
each school prepare their classes for the concerts with 
the help of program notes supplied by A. I. M. 

The A. I. M. Symphony Orchestra, under the direction 
of Kalman Novak, is now recognized as the best small pro- 
fessional orchestra in New England; in addition to its 
Museum-sponsored performances, the A. I. M. Chamber Orches- 
tra was invited last year to play at the Gardner Museum and 
for the Executives Club of the Boston Chamber of Commerce. 

The success which A. I. M. has enjoyed over the years 
is due in large part to the efficiency and dedication of a 
massive volunteer organization which handles ticket sales, 
transportation and liaison with schools in seven towns. 
The A. I. M. officers are listed elsewhere in this Report, 
and I am sincerely grateful to them all. 

Concerts 

The Museum's concert schedule is designed to provide 
varied and distinguished musical fare for our Associates. 
Concerts are selected on the recommendation of Kalman Novak, 
who serves the Museum as its musical advisor. In 1963, 
four concerts were presented at the Museum: a concert by 
Jeanne Stark, pianist; an "Evening of Baroque Chamber 
Music"; and two concerts by the Boston Fine Arts Woodwind 
Quintet. A Spring Concert was presented at Cary Hall in 
Lexington featuring the A. I. M. Chamber Orchestra with 
harpist Margaret White as guest soloist. 

The Print Club 

The DeCordova Print Club was formed in 1963 for Asso- 
ciates who are interested in purchasing prints and who wish 
to learn more about print-making and collecting. Member- 



118 






SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



ship in the Club is free and open to all Associates of the 
Museum; to join the Club it is necessary to own at least 
one print; members may renew their membership annually by 
purchasing one new print a year. 

Thirty prints belonging to members of the Print Club 
were exhibited in a "Collectors* Show" at the Museum in 
January. This exhibition was so successful and there is 
apparently such a wealth of material available in local 
collections that the "Collectors* Show" is expected to be 
a recurring event. 

During 1963 Print Club meetings were scheduled in con- 
junction with all print exhibits at the Museum. Guest 
speakers included Robert M. Light, noted authority on old 
master prints and drawings; George Lockwood, Boston print- 
maker, who conducted a demonstration in his own workshop; 
and Sinclair Hitchings, Curator of Prints at the Boston 
Public Library. Discussing American prints of the 1920 T s 
and 1930's, Mr. Hitchings spoke of the tremendous vogue 
which the graphic arts enjoyed in the pr e -depr es s ion years 
and pointed out that in the 20 f s "when you asked someone 
to come up and see your etchings you weren't kidding". 
The widespread interest in the De Cordova Print Club sug- 
gests that a growing number of local collectors could ex- 
tend such an invitation in all sincerity. As of December, 
1963, there were 102 members in the Club, and their collec- 
tive collections constitute an impressive store of etch- 
ings, engravings, woodcuts, lithographs and serigraphs. 

Membership 

The number of families enrolled as Museum Associates 
rose from 1,495 in December, 1962, to 1,752 in December, 
1963. This continuing growth in membership may be attri- 
buted largely to the unremitting efforts of our Associate 
Council on several fronts. The Council has sponsored a 
succession of concerts, lectures, coffees, and gallery 
talks for* members and prospective members. Local commit- 
tees have been organized in nearby towns to wage intensive 
campaigns to build membership in their communities. The 
three major benefit events sponsored by the Council were 
almost as effective in attracting new members as in raising 
funds . 

The Associate Council 

Under the Chairmanship of Mrs. Robert E. Grady, the 
Associate Council has in recent years become increasingly 



119 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



indispensable to our operation. Last year the Council 
conducted publicity, hospitality, membership campaigns, 
two film series and three successful benefits for the 
Museum. The three benefit events — "Artists at Work Day" , 
"Mardi Gras Festival", and "Silent Auction" - raised a to- 
tal of $13,135 for the Museum Building Fund. We are sin- 
cerely grateful to every one of the dedicated, imaginative 
and hard-working ladies who served on the Council in 1963. 

The Phone Book 

A Lincoln Telephone Directory, published in December, 
1963, by the Museum is expected to net a profit of more 
than $2,000 for the Building Fund. This income is re- 
ceived from the sale of advertising — the Directory is 
distributed without charge to the residents of the Town. 
Members of the Committee are listed at the end of this Re- 
port, and I salute them for the service they have rendered 
the Museum and the Town of Lincoln. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to 
members of the staff for their dedicated support and to 
the members of the Board of Directors for their purposeful 
commitment to the welfare of this institution. 



120 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

OPERATING STATEMENT FOR 19 6 3 

Operating Income: 

Trusts $77,648.07 

Associate Contributions 20,934.00 

Tuition 29,672.92 

Receipts from films, lectures, 

concerts 3,423.08 

Receipts from Benefits: 

Festival, Silent Auction, 

Artists at Work Day 19,497.00 

Other (sales, services, 

miscellaneous) 13 . 319 . 48 

Total Operating Income $164,494.55 

Operating Expense: 

Administrative Staff: 

Salaries & Benefits 63,457.74 

School : 

Salaries &, Expense 26,558.89 

Operating Expense of Museum 

and Park 56,129.33 

Expense charged to Benefit 

Events 6 . 362 .00 

Total Operating Expense 152,507.96 

Net Gain for 1963 $ 11,986.59 



BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31. 19 6 3 

Assets : 

Savings Bank Accounts $92,680.79 

Checking Account 21,123.54 

Imprest Accounts (petty cash, 

post office, payroll) 3,185.00 

Total Assets $ 116 ,989 .33 

Liabil i t ies : 

Corporate Reserve Fund 10,000.00 

Accession Funds (reserved for 

purchase of works of art) 105.93 

Building Fund (receipts from 

Benefit Events) 30,222.49 

2nd Decade Fund (receipts from 

2nd Decade Fund Campaign) 53,937.29 
Depreciation Funds (reserved for 

capital expenditures required 

for replacement of equipment; 

repair of buildings, roads, 

parking lots) 14,569.96 

( cont . ) 
121 



DECORDOVA MUSEUM 



Imprest Funds 
Working Capital 

Total Liabilities 



$ 3,185.00 
4.968.66 



$ 116.989.33 



Allocations to and Expenditures from Reserve Funds in 1963 



Accession 
Fund 

Bu i 1 d i n g 
Fund 

2nd Decade 
Fund 



Depreciation 
Funds 



Balance 
1/1/6 3 

$ 1,078.58 

18, 377.20 

33,608.12 



Allocated Expended 



Balance 
12/31/63 



13,135.00* 
2,058.42** 

27,204.80 



$ 972.65 $ 105.93 



3,348.13 30,222.49 



4,817.21 53,937.29 
2,058.42** 



11,712.03 4,500.00 1,642.07 14,569.96 



* Profit from Benefit Events: - 



Festival $5,217.00 

Silent Auction 6,873.00 
Ar t i s t s at 

Work Day 1,045.00 



** Transfer from 2nd Decade Fund to Building Fund (funds 
taken from Building Fund to launch 2nd Decade Fund 
Campaign in 19 60) 



122 



SCHOOLS, RECREATION AND LIBRARY 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 
MAJOR EXHIBITIONS AND EVENTS IN 19 6 3 



January - February : 



Exhibition of Paintings &. Drawings by 
Robert Neuraan 

Exhibition of "Earrings from Five Con- 
tinents" (from the collection of 
Olga Pertzof f ) 

Student Exhibition (Jan. 5-6) 

"Artists at Work Day" (Building Fund 
Benef i t , Jan . 6 ) 

Winter Film Series (Jan. 18, Feb. 1, Feb. 15) 

Print Club meeting, talk by Robert M. 
Light (Jan. 21) 

"Lincoln Evening" (Feb. 9) 

Lincoln Players 1 production, "The Easy 
Chair" (Feb. 16) 



February - March : 



Exhibition of Sculpture & Drawings by 

Thomas Morin 
"13th National Print Exhibition" from the 

Brooklyn Museum, circulated by the 

American Federation of Arts 
"Sudbury Evening" (March 2) 
Print Club meeting, lecture by George 

Lockwood (March 5) 



March - April : 



May - June 



"New Experiments in Art", exhibition of 

"'pop" art, other new trends 
Spring Film Series (March 15, April 3, May 

10) 
Spring Concert with A. I. M. Chamber 

Orchestra, harpist Margaret White 

(March 22) 
Lincoln Historical Society Reception (April 

19) 
Concert by the Boston Fine Arts Woodwind 

Quintet (April 26) 



•♦New England Art, Part I - Drawings", com- 
petitive exhibition, first in six part 

123 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 



series on New England art 
"Bedford Morning" (May lo) 
"Lexington Evening" (May 25) 
"Mardi Gras" Festival & Jazz Evening 



(June 8) 
July - August - September : 



"Art of Indonesia", exhibition of Indo- 
nesian arts and crafts 

Exhibition of paintings, drawings, prints 

and sculpture from the Museum Collection 
through the summer 



October - November: 



"New England Art, Part II - Paintings", 

2nd in New England Art Series 
"Artists Talk About Art", series of four 

lectures by exhibiting artists (Oct, 15, 

Oct. 22, Oct. 29 and Nov. 5) 
Concert by Boston Fine Arts Woodwind 

Quintet (Nov. 9) 
"Silent Auction", Building Fund Benefit 

(Nov. 15 - 16 - 17) 



November - December: 



Exhibition of Paintings from the Collection 
of William H. Lane 

Exhibition of American Prints of the 1920's 
and 1930*s (from the Wiggin Collection 
of the Boston Public Library) 

Print Club Meeting, Alfred Hitchings, speak- 
er (Nov. 26) 

"Concord Morning" (Dec. 4) 

"Sudbury Evening" (Dec. 7) 

Baroque Concert (Dec. 15) 



124 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS, DeCORDOVA MUSEUM 
Dec ember , 19 6 3 

Dana W. Atchley, Jr., President 

Paul W. Cook, Jr., Vice President 

Janet Daniels, Clerk 

Stanley Heck, Treasurer 

Eliot Hubbard, III 

John W. Lincoln 

Victor A. Lutnicki 

MUSEUM STAFF 
Dec ember , 19 6 3 

Frederick P. Walkey, Director 

Foster H. Nystrom, Assistant Director 

Miriam H. Jagger , Assistant to the Director 

Ann Alcott Lummus, Associate Secretary 

Diane Nixon, Registrar 

Linda Johnson, Staff Lecturer 

Ruthann Lehrer, Curatorial Assistant 

Cordelia Molloy, Bookkeeper 

Arthur Mazmanian, Graphic Designer 

Karl Lahnstein, Building Superintendent 

Floriy Campobasso, Caretaker 

Hugh Parsons, Custodian 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM, ASSOCIATE COUNCIL 



Chairman Mrs 

Secretary Mrs 

Membership Chairman Mrs 

Publicity Chairman Mrs 

Hospitality Chairman Mrs 

Fund Raising Chairman Mrs 
Adventures in Music 

Representative Mrs 

Film Advisory Chairman Mrs 

Festival Chairman Mrs 
Silent Auction Chairman Mrs 

Music Chairman Mrs 
Flower Arrangements 

Chairman Mrs 
Lincoln Garden Club 

Representative Mrs 

Lincoln Chairman Mrs 

Concord Chairman Mrs 

Acton Chairman Mrs 

Arlington Chairman Mrs 



Robert E. Grady 
John P. Stevenson 
Everett Black 
An drew Wales 
Charles Wadsworth 
Leopold Peavy 

Hayden Mason 
John W. White 
Theodore Tucker 
Charles Crumm 
Albert England 

Robert Booth 

Henry Hoover 
Robert L. Moore 
Richard Adler 
John R. Ehrenfeld 
Denis Robinson 



125 



DECORDOVA MUSEUM 



Belmont Chairman Mrs. Herbert C. Lee 

Carlisle Chairman Mrs. Edwin Campbell 

Lexington Chairman Mrs. John Wallace 

Sudbury Chairman Mrs. William Stenzel 

Wayland Chairman Mrs. John Beard 

Weston Chairman Mrs. Joseph Gardella 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM. CAPITAL GIFTS CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE 

A. Bradlee Emmons, Chairman 
Polly Hedge, Executive Secretary 
Harry Healey 
Sumner Smith 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM. BUILDING COMMITTEE 

John Pike, Chairman 

John Haartz 

Andrew Wales 

Stanley Heck 

Frederick Walkey (ex officio) 



DeCORDOVA PHONE BOOK COMMITTEE 



Mrs 

Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 



Hugh J. Miser, Chairman 
William B. Butler 
Paul B. Cook, Jr. 
William R. Barker 
Leo Barnecut 
Archer desCognets 
Barbara C. Dexter 
Martin L. Ernst 
George H. Fernald, Jr. 
Charles E. Jennings 
Robert Jevon 
David W. Kirkpatrick 
Richard Lang 
Dunbar Lockwood 
L. Bruce Long 
W. Robert Pearmain 
Walter J. Salmon 
Clement C. Sawtell 
Robert R. Smyth 
Werner Willmann 
Dick Wollmar 



126 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

REPORT 

to the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1962-1963 



November 


30 


December 


23 


January 


4 


February 


22 


March 


1 


April 


19 


April 


26 


May 


31 


June 


23 



SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 19 64-65 

September 8 Tuesday Teacher Orientation 

September 9 Wednesday Teacher Orientation 

September 10 Thursday Teacher Orientation 

September 11 Friday Students Report for Classes 

October 12 Monday Holiday 

November 11 Wednesday Holiday 

November 25 Wednesday Vacation 

(Begins at Noontime) 

Monday Classes Resume 

Wednesday Vacation 

(Begins at Noontime) 

Monday Classes Resume 

Monday Vacation Week 

Monday Classes Resume 

Monday Vacation Week 

Monday Classes Resume 

Monday Holiday 

Wednesday Classes End at Noontime 

N.B.: Within the regular school year, classes end noon- 
time on Wednesdays with the exception of the weeks 
in which there are holidays; in those instances, 
Wednesdays are full days. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will 
reverse on Monday, January 25, 1965. 

SUMMER SCHOOL - 19 65 

Wednesday School Opens 

Friday School Ends 

be given on our fire alarm system - 

3-3-3, repeated at 
3-3-3 

Radio station announcements will be read between the period 
of 6:30 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up 
local phone lines to school officials and bus operators. 

WCOP 1150K WNAC 680K 

WBZ 1030K WHDH 850K 

WEEI 590K WEZE 1260K 

Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL' 1 are made by the Lincoln 
Superintendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary Schools 
(grades K-8) only. Announcements for the Regional High 
School are made by the Regional Superintendent of Schools 
and will be designated "Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School". 

128 



June 


30 


July 


30 


Local 


signals will 




7:15 a.m. 




7 : 30 a.m. 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 

Term Exp ires 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Perry J. Culver, M. D. , Chairman 1964 

C. DeWitt Smith 1965 

(Mrs.) Helen Gilfoy 1966 

Meetings: Regular: First Monday of each month, 

7:30 p.m. Office of the 
Superintendent. 259-9400 

Called: Third Monday of each month 
usually, and other meetings 
as stated. Time and place 
to be designated. 

All regular meetings open. 
Items for the agenda must 
be in the Office of the 
Superintendent by 3:00 p.m. 
on the Thursday prior to the 
Monday meeting. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Robert L. Filbin Center School 259-9400 

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE STAFF 
Frances R. Gar del la Secretary 

(Mrs.) Harriett Parks Financial Secretary 
(Mrs.) Mary Bufton Clerk-Typist 

Hours: Office of the Superintendent - 
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday - 
Friday; Saturdays and evenings 
by appointment. 

PRINCIPAL. SMITH SCHOOL 
Stefan Vogel 259-9403 

OFFICE STAFF 
(Mrs.) Solveig Parsons Secretary, 

Smith School 
(Mrs.) Ruth Gaynor 

PRINCIPAL, HANSCOM SCHOOL 
Robert A. Leach 274-7720 

OFFICE STAFF 
(Mrs.) Lucile Needham Secretary, 

Hanscom School 
(Mrs . ) Mary Bach 

129 



SCHOOLS 



PRINCIPAL. HARTWELL SCHOOL 
(Mrs.) Joan B. Warren 259-9404 

OFFICE STAFF 
(Mrs.) Doris Bardsley Secretary, 

Hartwell School 
(Mrs.) Kathryne Palmer 

Resigned in 1963: (Mrs.) Anne Whelan, Hanscom School 

HOURS ... SCHOOL OFFICES 
8:15 a.m. - 4:15 p.m., Monday through Friday 



George Drake 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 
Center School 

SCHOOL NURSES 



(Mrs.) Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 

Lincoln Schools 
(Mrs.) Gladys Crumb, R. N. - Hanscom School 

SUPERVISOR OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



259-9401 



John J. Carroll 



Center School 



259-9407 
274-7723 



259-9401 



Ralph Weatherbee 
Harold Cuttell 
Nelson Palumbo 
Frank Cole 
Daniel 0*Leary 
Harold Swift 
John Biondo 
Oscar DeConto 



CUSTODIANS 

Center School 
Hartwell School 
Hartwell School 
Hanscom School 
Hanscom School 
Hanscom School 
Smith School 
Smith School 

TELEPHONE NUMBERS 



Office of the Superintendent 
Offices of Principals: 

Hartwell 

Hanscom 

Smith 
Administrative Assistant 
Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 
Nur ses : 

Lincoln (Mrs. Garrison) 

Hanscom (Mrs. Crumb) 



259-9400 

259-9404 
274-7720 
259-9403 
259-9401 
259-9401 

259-9407 
274-7723 



130 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Perry J. Culver, M. D. t Chairman 

Helen Gilfoy 

C. DeWitt Smith 

In its report for 1963, the School Committee is 
pleased to record continued satisfaction with the total 
effort of the faculty and the administration of the Lin- 
coln Elementary Schools in our quest for quality education 
The needs of each individual student rather than that of a 
class as a whole have been the main considerations in de- 
veloping new educational methods and curricular materials. 
Details of some of these improvements are ably presented 
in the report of the Superintendent. 

Increasing recognition by educators throughout the 
land of the pioneering leadership of the Lincoln School 
System is evidence of the value of team teaching, non- 
graded classes, the reading program, flexible teaching 
spaces and the policy of a merit system for faculty salar- 
ies. The Lincoln School System was one of twelve in the 
United States selected by the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science for initiation of a new science 
curriculum in the primary schools. Our participation con 
tinues in the Madison Project for the teaching of mathe- 
mat ics . 

Our contributions of distinguished visitors and con- 
sultants have been of immeasurable value to the faculty as 
it continues to plan for further improvements. For 1963, 
the school was pleased to have days with Dr. Don Orton, 
President, Lesley College, in the Distinguished Visitors 
Series; Dr. David V. Tiedeman, Professor, Harvard Graduate 
School of Education, consultant in the field of guidance; 
Dr. Nelson Brooks, Associate Professor of French, Yale 
University and Miss Lillian Adams of the Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut, School System, consultants in the teaching of 
French; Dr. Dorothea Hinman, reading consultant; Dr. Rob- 
ert Davis, Director, Madison Project, consultant in modern 
mathematics, and Joseph Grannis, Instructor in Education, 
Harvard Graduate School of Education, consultant in the 
teaching of social studies. 

This year saw changes in administrative personnel and 
in the physical plant. Dr. John B. Davis, Jr., resigned 
as Superintendent to assume the challenging post of Super- 
intendent of Public Schools, Worcester, Massachusetts. 



131 



SCHOOLS 



The School Committee was most pleased to have Mr, Robert 
L. Filbin accept appointment as Superintendent. Mr. Fil- 
bin, previously Principal and Co-ordinator of Instruction, 
has been closely associated with all of the recent growth 
and development of the Lincoln Elementary Schools. Mr. 
Stefan Vogel , team leader in the middle school, was ap- 
pointed Principal of the Smith/Center schools. 

Concrete evidence of much needed additions to the 
school plant appeared with ground breaking in the fall of 
1963 for the new auditorium, science, music and art com- 
plex, and additional general teaching spaces at Smith and 
Hartwell schools. Construction of these buildings was 
delayed for a year because of initial bids which exceeded 
the voted appropriation. Heroic and untiring efforts of 
the School Building Committee achieved success when their 
presentation of the building problem to a Special Town 
Meeting on June 3 resulted in a strongly favorable vote 
for the additional needed money. 

Quality education costs money. The following table 
shows the budgeted per pupil cost for instructional sala- 
ries, transportation, and all other operating expenses for 
the years 1961 through 1964. 

Year 1961 1962 1963 1964 

No. Pupils 894 920 971 974 

Instruction 

Salaries 298,350.00 343,360.00 400,200.00 426,000.00 
Per Pupil 

Cost 333.72 373.22 412,15 437.37 

Transporta- 
tion 32,700.00 34,500.00 40,800.00 42,462.00 

Per Pupil 

Cost 36.58 37.50 42,02 43.59 

All Other 138,450.00 146,915.00 152,066.00 159,157.00 
Per Pupil 

Cost 154.87 159.69 156.61 163.41 

Grand Total 469,500.00 524,775.00 593,066,00 627,619.00 
Per Pupil 

Cost 525.17 570.41 610.78 644.37 

The per pupil cost for each school year is based on 
the enrollment as of October 1 of the preceding year. The 



132 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



major factor in increasing per pupil cost is that for in- 
structional salaries. Nevertheless, the average faculty 
salary for 1964 stands at $6,591. This relatively low 
figure is due in a large part to the youth of the faculty. 
The total per pupil cost is as much as 50% less than that 
of comparable quality school systems in other parts of the 
United States. 

In conclusion, we would be most remiss if we did not 
record, with gratitude, the support and advice of other 
Town committees and individual citizens. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Robert L. Filbin 

In the past six years much has happened to change the 
course of education in the United States. Much of this 
change took place as a result of the Russian Sputnick. A 
great deal more has been the result of a new awareness of 
the importance of education. In fifty years, the United 
States has moved from the standard of a grammar school 
education for the majority of its people to that of a high 
school education for all plus a college education for as 
many as possible. For many, this latter includes not just 
four years of college but graduate school and beyond. 

With these objectives in mind, it becomes apparent 
that an educational system geared to a grammar school edu- 
cation for the majority is simply inadequate to perform 
this kind of job. 

The school committees of the Town of Lincoln, past 
and present, have been well aware of this and during the 
past six years many changes have taken place in the 
schools which mark Lincoln as a prime mover in the develop- 
ment of many educational ideas. These ideas are current- 
ly being accepted as standard practice in forward-looking 
school systems throughout the country. 

It seems appropriate in this report to review the 
innovations that have taken place and to indicate the 
effect they have had on shaping the schools. 

The most important part of any school system is the 
teaching staff. Lincoln, during the past six years, has 
sought out the best and most promising teachers it could 

133 



SCHOOLS 



find to do the teaching job. Almost fifty per cent of 
the present staff holds a master's degree. One staff mem- 
ber holds a doctorate degree. People are selected not 
only for their educational training, but for their general 
background as well. There has been a trend towards hir- 
ing more teachers with prior experience before employment 
in the Lincoln schools. The average age of the faculty 
is twenty-nine which means that it is a lively and ener- 
getic faculty which has a great deal to offer the children 
and the community. The schools have had a merit salary 
program since the 1950 f s which is a great incentive to the 
teachers. Merit salary really works in Lincoln to the 
point that the faculty unanimously vote to continue it 
each year. Many school systems, tired of the annual stan- 
dard increment for all teachers whether they have done a 
good job or not, have made inquiries into how the Lincoln 
system works. There is a growing trend towards this kind 
of salary policy and Dean Mark Shibles of the University 
of Maine recently predicted that by 1970 the majority of 
school systems in the United States will have moved towards 
adopting such a policy. 



In the Lincoln schools, another innovation made six 
years ago which has borne fruit is the introduction of an 
alphabetic-phonetic approach to reading, spelling and writ- 
ing. The reading program has recently been written up in 
a book published by the New England School Development 
Council (NESDEC) entitled: Focus on Reading . This re- 
port was written by a team of specialists from the New 
England Reading Association who observed the reading pro- 
gram in action in the schools through a series of visits. 



had 

annu 

has 

year 

spel 

over 

the 

in t 

for 

per 

Ac hi 

can 

tens 

impo 



More important is the effect the reading program has 
on children. The Director of Testing, in her 1962-63 
al report to the School Committee 1 , states that there 
been a very distinct upward trend over the past four 
s in reading medians as the children progress. In 
ling, she reports that the scores reflect a steady gain 

the original starting point providing ample proof that 
spelling program in Lincoln really works. Children 
he nine-year-old group after having had this approach 
four years scored seventy-four per cent in the top ten 
cent of the nation, and none below average on the Iowa 
evement Tests. As both school and Town librarians 
affirm, the children as a result are reading more ex- 
ively than ever before. This, in itself, is of major 
r tance . 



The teaching of mathematics is another area of the 



134 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



curriculum which has undergone extensive change. As many 
as five years ago, Lincoln became aware of the great need 
to up-date the teaching of mathematics. During a summer 
workshop, the faculty had the opportunity of meeting with 
Dr. Robert B. Davis of the Madison Mathematics Project and 
with Dr. David Page of the University of Illinois Mathe- 
matics Program to discuss developments in the field of 
mathematics instruction. As a result of these meetings 
and extensive in-service education of the staff, some new 
approaches to mathematics were introduced. At the primary 
levels, the greater Cleveland Mathematics Program was put 
into operation. This was supplemented by the Illinois 
Mathematics Program and the use of Cuisenaire rods. This 
latter device was introduced to the Lincoln primary teach- 
ers by Mr. William Hull of the Shady Hill School in Cam- 
bridge and members of his faculty. At the junior high 
level, many aspects of modern math were introduced with 
heavy emphasis on the Madison approach. Within the past 
two years, the Lincoln schools have received financial 
grants from the Madison Project for in-service education 
of the staff. This continues at the present time. 

One of the major changes in the past five years is 
the reorganization of the lower school on the basis of non- 
grading and team teaching. In 1958, the staff, realizing 
that many children could progress beyond the traditionally 
graded subject matter material agreed to carry each child 
as far as he could go in the various skills subjects. For 
example, children in first grade who could read books of 
the second or third grade were permitted to read these 
books. The same was true of other skills subjects. This 
was the beginning of a wide reaching effort to meet the 
instructional needs of children more effectively. This 
type of teaching has extended itself throughout the entire 
school system with excellent results. Not only are the 
faster moving pupils permitted to move along, but the slow- 
er moving pupils are greatly helped. The Director of Test- 
ing reports that in 1963 there were striking gains made by 
the slower moving groups in all areas. Team teaching, 
initiated by Lincoln four years ago, has permitted better 
utilization of teachers' time and talents. Traditionally, 
one teacher in a self-contained classroom was required to 
teach all subjects to the children. With team teaching, 
each teacher has no more than three basic preparations. 
Under this system, teachers feel they can prepare better 
for their lessons and, as a result, their teaching has im- 
proved. When Lincoln began non-grading and team teaching, 
there were no more than fifty schools in the country en- 
gaged in this kind of program. Today this number has been 

135 



SCHOOLS 



multiplied several times over and these ideas are very 
much in evidence in the major school systems throughout 
the United States. 

Other changes which have taken place relate to the 
teaching of English, Science, Art, Music, Physical Educa- 
tion and History. All of these subjects have received 
considerable attention at the national level where there 
has been a ferment for change. The Lincoln English staff 
has been concerned wit'h the introduction of linguistics in 
the teaching of English. The Science staff has been iden- 
tified with the "discovery" approach to teaching Science as 
expounded by Jerome Bruner of Harvard. Recently, Lincoln 
has been identified with a program developed by the Nation- 
al Science Foundation for the teaching of Science in this 
way in the primary school. Lincoln was early identified 
with the teaching of French in the elementary school. As 
a result, many of its students are placed in advanced 
French classes when they enter high school and college. 

The elementary school library started as a result of 
an interested citizenry five years ago and has become an 
integral part of the school program. Its services are 
closely identified with instruction within the classrooms 
and its librarians function as librarian-teachers working 
directly with the teaching staff and children. From a 
collection of one hundred and twenty-five books, the li- 
brary has grown almost to the minimum standard established 
by the National Library Association of ten books per child; 
roughly nine thousand books. The school library has been 
recognized as a leader in the field of elementary school 
libraries and was used last summer as the center for a 
Boston University Summer School course: Elementary School 
Libraries . 

While the teaching staff and the educational program 
are the most important part of a school system, the build- 
ings which house teachers and children contribute a great 
deal to the effectiveness of the program. 

Lincoln's school buildings have adapted themselves 
well to the changes which have taken place. In the most 
recent buildings -- the Hartwell Additions, the Hanscom 
School and the new Upper School currently under construct- 
ion — many of the ideas which were developed have been 
recognized nationally. These have served as prototypes 
for many buildings now under construction in the United 
States. The movable walls, the flexibility of classroom 
spaces, the adaptability of buildings to various age 



136 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



groups and the campus plan of the schools all are ideas 
taking form now in other parts of the country. It is in- 
teresting to observe that because of the great flexibility 
of its classrooms and the ingenuity of its staff, Lincoln 
has been able to accommodate many more children than that 
number which was designed for the original classroom 
spaces . 

As the schools move on into the sixties, a staff 

which is constantly examining what it does in terms of its 

quality and its effect on boys and girls will find ways of 
better performing the teaching job. 



PRINCIPALS, SMITH, CENTER AND HARTWELL SCHOOLS 

Joan B. Warren, Principal, Hartwell School 

Stefan Vogel , Principal, Smith and Center Schools 

STAFF 

The Hartwell School faculty consists of thirty-one 
full and part-time teachers. Twenty-six are assigned to 
teams, three are specialists (music, art, physical educa- 
tion), and two are part-time (reading consultant and li- 
brar ian ) . 

The teaching staff of Smith and Center Schools con- 
sists of thirty-three teachers. Thirty of these are full- 
time and three are part-time teachers. Seven of the 
faculty represent replacements for last year's full-time 
faculty members and one represents the creation of a full- 
time position in math from a part-time position last year. 
In addition, Mr. Weinberg, speech therapist for the schools, 
is available to Smith and Center Schools on a part-time 
bas i s . 

UTILIZATION OF BUILDINGS 

319 pupils (Teams R, Y, B) are housed in Hartwell 
main building; 113 pupils (Team 0) in Unit A, and 130 pup- 
ils (Team G) in Unit B. This latter unit continues to be 
extremely crowded. 

The Audio-Visual Room is used regularly for reading 
and math groups as well as offices for music and art teach- 
ers and storage of audio-visual equipment. The Conference 
Room is used as an office and classroom for our Reading 

137 



SCHOOLS 



Consultant and Speech Therapist. This room is also used 
four mornings a week for children receiving individual 
tutoring. Two offices in the additions are used for in- 
dividual tutoring on a daily basis. The Mul t i -Purpose 
Room houses two reading groups simultaneously for the first 
part of the day and physical education classes for the re- 
mainder of the time. 

113 children are housed at Center School (Team N) and 
299 children are housed at Smith School (Grades 6, 7, 8). 
It should be noted that the special rooms such as science 
labs and art room are being utilized as homerooms because 
of lack of space. The south lobby has been set up as a 
study hall and needed teacher office space has been pro- 
vided through remodeling of a storage area. 

ORGANIZATION 

This mark 
been organized 
formal evaluat 
school) indica 
both children 
team ranges fr 
6 teachers are 
now Leader for 
Mr. Stefan Vog 
with the Princ 
at least once 



s the third year that Hartwell School has 

on a non-graded team teaching basis. In- 
ions made during last year (including summer 
te the general success of this design for 
and faculty. The number of children in a 
om 93 (Team R) to 130 (Team G) and from 3 to 
assigned to a team. Mrs. Jane Stewart is 
Team R and Mrs. Marguerite Maloney replaced 
el as Leader in Team 0. Team Leaders meet 
ipal weekly and with their own team teachers 
a week. 



Team N continues as a teaching team at Center School. 
Mr. Joseph Lessard was appointed as Team Leader with Mrs. 
Phyllis McKenney as senior teacher. Their work during the 
summer session resulted in an improved program in terms of 
teacher utilization and effectiveness. 

Sixth grade is organized as a departmentalized teach- 
ing team under the direction of Mrs. Ruth Zollinger (Team 
Leader) and Mr. David Conrad (Senior Teacher). An evalua- 
tion of the team plan will take place in the Spring. With 
the exception of two English teachers, all major subject 
teachers in this team are both homeroom and subject teach- 
ers for sixth graders. 

Grades 7 and 8 continue on a departmentalized basis. 
For the first time, the teachers in these levels teach only 
7th and 8th grade sections rather than 6th, 7th and 8th. 
Mrs. Ann Paranya and Mrs. Ruth Mahoney are grade level 
chairmen for grades 8 and 7 respectively. 



138 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



The above organizational practices are expected to re- 
sult in improved communication regarding children and more 
effective coordination of the instructional program. 

INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM 

In teams Y, G, B, and N, children are grouped homo- 
geneously for reading and for math, but remain in hetero- 
geneous groups for Science, Social Studies, Art, Music and 
Physical Education. The flexibility in grouping and the 
opportunity for teachers to do some specialization of sub- 
ject matter are two of the most important features in pro- 
viding a better education of each child. 

As our library resources and services increase, they 
become more and more valuable to our total program. Both 
Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Tonseth do some teaching in conjunction 
with their regular duties. 

Mr. Donald Ford, Director of Science, was invited to 
participate in an American Association for the Advancement 
of Science Project during last summer from which came a 
tentative Science Curriculum for grades K-3. Lincoln was 
chosen as one of the ten school systems in the United States 
to participate in the use and refinement of this material 
for the current school year. Mr. Ford, in addition to his 
duties at Smith School meets weekly with the four teachers 
(one each from Teams R, Y, B and G) who are teaching the 
units. A formal evaluation will be made at the end of the 
school year, but the teachers and children involved seem to 
be most enthusiastic. 

New positions at Smith School have resulted in a more 
effective and increased instructional program in music and 
art. A new series of art offerings (ceramics, enamelling, 
sculpture, etc.) have been incorporated into the program. 
For the first time in recent years, Center School is now 
completely serviced by Smith School personnel in both art 
and music. This in turn has provided a more effective 
program in these areas at Hartwell. 

The "language laboratory" was installed early in the 
1963-64 school year, and is being used regularly by the 
French Department. This is an excellent device, and holds 
much promise for areas other than French. It will be 
used more extensively as materials are developed. 

Work with the Madison Project mathematics continues 
with the part time services of Mrs. Marianne Ockerbloom. 

139 



SCHOOLS 



This is a demonstration and in-service training program. 

A somewhat more flexible schedule developed as a re- 
sult of last year's planning at Smith School. One or more 
double periods per week are now being given in the follow- 
ing subjects: English, History, Art, Shop, Home Economics, 
Science and Music. This has proved to be beneficial in 
providing time for activities which require much prepara- 
tion of materials and for occasional work with large and 
small groups. 



In October , 
ted in the schoo 
children involve 
Camp, the operat 
was held in conj 
science program 
bers, but had to 
ute due to a fir 
uation of the sc 
place in the Spr 



the sixth grade students again participa- 
1 camping program. Due to the numbers of 
d, and the space limitations of Sargent 
ion extended over a two-week period and 
unction with Hanscom School. An excellent 
was developed by Smith School faculty mem- 
be curtailed to an extent at the last min- 
e ban in the New Hampshire woods. An eval 
hool camping program is expected to take 
ing. 



Study periods were instituted at Smith School this 
year as a means of providing students with the chance to 
receive supervised study and library time during the school 
day. Children receive, on the average, five 40-minute 
periods per week. This appears to be beneficial in that 
homework is better prepared and more often completed on 
time than in the past. Another result of the study peri- 
ods is a greatly increased use of the school library, with 
which Mrs, Catherine Jones, School Librarian, and many 
volunteer mothers have admirably coped. Also, increasing 
types of individual projects and special help periods have 
been made available by the scheduling of study periods. 

FUTURE PLANS 

The necessary building additions to the Lincoln 
Schools expected last September are now planned ready for 
occupancy in September, 1964, 

The new Hartwell Unit should alleviate presently 
crowded conditions and provide needed additional multi- 
purpose space , 

Hartwell School will continue to house Teams R, Y, B, 
G and 0. With the completion of the new upper school 
building, the group which has been housed in Center School 
will be located in Smith School. 



140 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

This move will be immediately beneficial to all child- 
ren in the upper school. It has been difficult in the 
past three years to deal with the needs of children at Cen- 
ter and Smith in certain areas due to building location. 
Personnel serving both schools had, in some respects, to 
curtail aspects of their program for both groups due to 
travel time. Therefore, with all groups located on a 
central campus, the services in Art, Music, Library and 
Physical Education should be improved. 

In anticipation of the new buildings, faculty plan- 
ning and discussion continues in curriculum, grouping and 
scheduling. Certain changes are expected as the result 
of the pending move to new facilities. These should 
serve to continue making education in Lincoln, for teachers 
as well as children, a richly varied, challenging and ex- 
cellent experience. 

Mr. Donald Ford, Director of Science, will have 
broader supervisory responsibilities beginning in 1964. 
This will strengthen the science program at Hartwell, Smith 
and Hanscom. He will work actively in the direction, im- 
plementation and refining of the new methods being adopted 
into the curriculum. 

A new physical education teacher has been needed in 
order to give a better experience to children in the 9 to 
12-year age groups. Such a person will be employed for 
the 1964 school year. 



PRINCIPAL, HANSCOM SCHOOL 

Robert A. Leach 

The past year at Hanscom School has been marked by an 
increase in enrollment that has filled the building to near 
capacity. We now have between 580 and 590 students. 
(Building capacity is rated at 600 pupils.) 

It is interesting to note that, as our enrollment has 
increased, the staff has doubled in size since the opening 
of the school five years ago. Our present staff numbers 
thirty-six full and part-time teachers. It is now the 
largest single school operation in our system and there is 
every indication of still further growth. 

A major objective this past year has been to develop 
team-teaching and a diversified grouping approach at the 

141 



SCHOOLS 



upper levels, grades six through eight. 

During the summer workshop key staff members developed 
an instructional program to utilize effectively the flexi- 
ble classroom spaces in the new addition completed last 
spring. As a result, children at these grade levels are 
grouped and scheduled in a manner that allows instruction 
at different ability levels in major subject areas. In 
large group situations the children meet as entire age- 
level groups for lessons designed for this approach. Ess- 
entially, this is a continuation of the non-graded or level 
approach which has been in operation for the past few years 
in the lower elementary and primary grade levels. 

The implementation of an organizational pattern of 
this type has been dependent on two major factors. First, 
it was necessary to have the flexible classroom facilities 
in which to operate. Second, it has been most important 
to have a teaching staff capable of planning and working 
together as effective team units. Our new unit, F. 
Cluster, and a seasoned well-qualified group of teachers, 
have made this departure from a less-flexible program pos- 
s ible . 

For the second year, we have enjoyed an affiliation 
with Harvard University as a participating school in the 
M. A. T. interne program. Practice teachers from Boston 
University, Harvard and Springfield College have been 
trained by our staff during the past year. 

The increased enrollment this year has necessitated 
the addition of two full time classroom teachers and two 
special teachers assigned on a part time basis. 

Our six through eleven-year-old pupils are grouped at 
sixteen ability levels in math and reading. This has pro- 
vided the flexibility needed to cope with the diversified 
backgrounds of our students. The classroom experiences 
of these children, while at Hanscom, range from a solid 
math program embracing elements of modern math, to an ex- 
panding program in the area of individualized reading. 
The basic planning for the individualized reading approach 
was formulated in the summer workshop. An excellent li- 
brary, now containing approximately four thousand books, 
contributes to this program. 

It seems to be characteristic of Hanscom, as well as 
most schools, that the great bulge in our school popula- 
tion is occurring in the younger age groups. Currently, 

142 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



we are experiencing rather crowded conditions in our six 
and seven-year -ol d classrooms. We have experimented this 
year with a plan to meet this situation. Our six-year- 
olds were released at 2 P.M. each day until the mid-year 
vacation. The D. Cluster team, which works with this age 
group, was then made available for special tutoring of 
seven-year -old s for the last hour of the school day. 

This utilization of four extra rooms and teachers has 
been very helpful in meeting the problem of larger than 
average classes housed in sections of the building where 
no space is available for large group instruction. We 
hope to continue this plan next year. 

Hanscom School enjoys a close working relationship 
with Bedford High School. Our classes attending Bedford 
High seem to be well prepared for the curriculum offered 
there. In the area of mathematics, Bedford has recently 
adopted the SMSG program in the ninth grade. This pro- 
vides continuity for the experiences gained at Hanscom, 
where elements of the SMSG program are being taught start- 
ing at the fourth grade level. Similarly, English, his- 
tory and French courses of study are geared at the high 
school level to provide for the matriculation of Hanscom 
stud ent s , 

From the standpoint of future growth, the picture at 
Hanscom is an interesting one. Next year we anticipate 
an increase of fifty students. If the current enrollment 
figures remain at present levels, our enrollment next Fall 
should be in the vicinity of 650 children. At this writ- 
ing, it seems quite evident that the Base Housing will in- 
crease by some 200 units by 1965, The impact of this 
building, if it does occur, will result in the construction 
of more classrooms at Hanscom. Currently we envision a 
separate building adjacent to our present kindergarten wing. 
This unit will contain flexible instructional spaces to 
accommodate approximately 240 pupils, with a gymnasium and 
off ice spaces . 

As Hanscom continues to grow and develop, we hope to 
maintain our identity with the Lincoln School system and 
its forward looking efforts to provide the most effective 
educational program for all of our children. 



143 



SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 

In September all children, kindergarten through 8th 
grade, were weighed and measured with the assistance of 
Mrs. Torode, Mrs. Iosue and Mr. Reed, our physical educa- 
tion teachers. 

Children entering kindergarten had the State required 
physical examination, including small pox vaccination. 
The majority were seen by their own family doctor. Twenty- 
three were examined by Dr. John Davies at the Well Child 
Conference . 

During October and November school-wide dental screen- 
ing was done by Dr. William Tingey, our school dentist. 
Three hundred and sixty-six children were referred for den- 
tal treatment or orthodontia. This year it was the de- 
cision of the Selectmen and the Board of Health that the 
services of the Lincoln Dental Clinic would be confined to 
a yearly examination of the children's teeth in the Hart- 
well, Center and Smith Schools. The Dental Clinic which 
had offered actual care, i.e., fillings, extractions and 
prophylaxis has been discontinued. The decision to dis- 
continue the Clinic as a dental care service was indicated 
for several reasons: 1. The relatively small number using 
the Clinic made it expensive to operate in terms of both 
money and time spent by a dentist; 2. The equipment is old 
and some of it is obsolete, needing to be repaired or re- 
placed, all of which is extremely costly; 3. It is not 
practical to keep the older children away from their class- 
rooms when dental treatment is needed over a period of 
time. However, the Board of Health is desirous that all 
Lincoln children should receive adequate dental care. In 
cases where financial help is needed, treatment can be 
arranged by a private dentist appointed by the Board of 
Health. Any parent desiring further information should 
call Mrs. Garrison at the Smith School between 9:00 a.m. 
and 10:00 a.m 259-9407. 

In October and November with the help of volunteers 
trained by the Department of Public Health, the annual 
hearing testing program was completed. There were twenty- 
six failures. Several of these were children with known 
hearing disabilities who have been under medical supervis- 
ion. The new cases were discussed with the parents and 
further testing by an ear specialist advised. 

144 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



In December in line with recommendations of the Divi- 
sion of Tuberculosis Control, tuberculin testing was done 
at the six-year-old level. There were four reactors, and 
these children were seen for health appraisal and chest X- 
ray at the Middlesex Sanatorium and follow-up was done on 
close contacts. This testing program is an entirely vol- 
untary measure and it is gratifying to be able to report 
that we have almost one hundred per cent return on our per- 
mission slips from parents. The Mantoux tuberculin test 
is offered at the same time to all school personnel includ- 
ing bus drivers so that they can comply with the State reg- 
ulation of having either a negative tuberculin test or 
chest X-ray every three years. 

In January and February the annual vision screening 
was done. We now have a new Bausch and Lomb vision tester 
and it is very satisfactory and easy to use. There were 
forty-seven failures. Parents were notified and advised 
to have children seen by an eye doctor. As in the hearing 
testing program the initial testing is done by trained vol- 
unteers. The failures are retested by Mrs. Garrison and 
then referred for medical examination. 

The Sabin Oral Polio vaccine clinics for giving of 
Type #2 took place in the schools in March, 1963. Types 
#1 and tf 3 had been given to children of all ages in the 
Town in May and June, 1962. Clinics were also held for 
pre-school and high school children and adults and a more 
complete report on the Sabin polio immunization program 
will be found under the Board of Health report. 

The Mental Health Program in the schools has continued 
under the supervision of Mrs. Rogers from the Walden Clinic 
in Concord. Mr s. Rogers is in the Lincoln schools every 
Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. She sees teachers 
by appointment, has group meetings with teachers, and con- 
ferences with parents when requested. The principals and 
teachers of the various schools feel that this professional 
direction is of great value in advising them how best to 
help children with behavior problems or emotionally dis- 
turbed children, 

Mrs. Iosue, Mrs. Torode and Mr. Reed have an excellent 
after-school sports program for boys and girls. The Smith 
School girls play hockey in the fall, basketball in the win- 
ter and softball in the spring. The boys play soccer, 
basketball and baseball. The emphasis is on intramural 
teams so that the largest possible number can compete, as 
well as having selected teams play other schools. 

145 



SCHOOLS 



Again this year this report would be incomplete with- 
out thanks for the splendid volunteer service given to the 
school health program. Mrs. Tead is at the Hartwell 
School three mornings a week. She keeps the medical files 
in order and did a masterful job with the Sabin vaccine 
clinic records which presented some knotty problems. Mrs. 
David Ammen, Mrs. Stuart Avery, Mrs. Gordon Donaldson, Mrs. 
Rufus Grason and Mrs. Ralph Ruocco are expert helpers with 
the vision and hearing testing and without their pleasant 
and interested assistance it would be difficult to run 
these programs. 



146 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 19 6 3 



Jonathan Starr Avery 

Stanley Tead Avery 

Earl David Baxter 

Leo Francis Bertolami, Jr. 

Peter Braun 

George Uberto Browning, III 

David Lawrence Caras 

Jennifer Hurd Caskey 

Herbert Neil Chellis, Jr. 

Maggie Church 

Lawrence Anthony Ciampi 

Marcia Louise Coffey 

Alexandra Conley 

James Frederick Cunningham 

Sarah Daniels 

Chester Congdon d'Autremont, 

Jr. 
Jonathan Douglas Donaldson 
Bradford L. Douty 
Robert Trueworthy Elliott 
Eleanor Bradlee Emmons 
John F. Eppling 
Louise Kernan Farley 
Nancy Joanne Farrell 
Maureen Finnerty 
Charles Chase Flanders, Jr. 
James Bruce Foust 
George A. Fullerton 
Joanne Marie Gagne 
Dorothy Marie Gajewski 
Mary Ann Gentile 
Nancy B. Gilfoy 
Sally Elizabeth Goodwin 
Elliott Vincent Grabill, Jr. 
Robin Gras 
Anne Cogswell Gross 
Sabra Haden 
Charles Paul Hagenian 
June A. Hanscon 
Robert H. Hanscon 
Gary Wade Harris 
Gerald C. Henderson, III 



Guy Letchford Jackson 
Mark Ellis Jozwicki 
Deborah Wing Kelley 
Elizabeth Randall 

Kindl eber ger 
Thomas Steven Kusleika 
Winifred Ann Landrey 
Carol S . Lee 
Linda Leger 
Janet Frances Lennon 
Ruth Ann Linstrom 
Lucy Livengood 
Andrea Freud Loewenstein 
Donna Marie Catherine Loveys 
Susan Alcott Lummus 
Elizabeth J. Maclnnis 
Douglas F. McMurtry 
Virginia Mellish 
Ellen Starr Morgan 
Beth Justine Navon 
Elizabeth Anne Caswell Newton 
Thomas Francis Norton 
Ann Robin Novak 
Joy Elaine Park 
Marcia Evelyn Prest 
Katherine Munro Preston 
William B. Quarton 
Edward Arthur Rappoli 
Ann Rhodes 
Richard D. Schultze 
Mark King Scott 
Glen Wayne Shaw 
Harold H. Shaw, Jr. 
Deborah Jean Siler 
Sandra Louise Silva 
William A. Titus, Jr. 
Charles Lee Todd, II 
Joseph B. Travers 
Al i Selim Uzuner 
Ronald Albert Wilfert 
Stewart K. Wilson 
Barbara Ann Woods 



147 



SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 19 64 

1963 Budget 1963 Expenses 1964 Budget 

Classification Requested 

ADMINISTRATION (former- 
ly General Control): 

School Committee Ex. $ 1,100.00 $ 1,149.37 $ 1,349.00 
Salaries, Sup ' t & 

Sec'ys, 20,100.00 19,515.67 19,129.00 

Office & Sup't's. Ex. 2.020.00 1. 632.14 2.020.00 

$ 23,220.00 $ 22,297.18 $ 22,498.00 

OUT-OF-STATE TRAVEL $ 9 50.00 $ 46 7.0 8 $ 1,160.00 

INSTRUCTION (Now in- 
cludes Library): 

Salaries $400,200.00 $391,950.37 $426,000.00 

Summer Workshop (6,960.00)* (6,960.00)* 5,560.00 

Textbooks 5,300.00 6,349.74 1,688.00 

Library 7,350.00 7,371,36 6,320.00 

Supplies & Other Ex. 19 .460.00 21 .106.42 18 .107.00 

$439,270.00 $433,737.89 $457,675.00 

OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES: 

Health $ 100.00 $ 92.69 $ 100.00 

Transportation 41 .500 .00 39 .460.34 43. 662.00 

$ 41,600.00 $ 39,553.03 $ 43,762.00 

OPERATION & MAINT. OF 
PLANT (Now combined): 

Custodial Salaries $ 28,150.00 $ 28,908.38 $ 35,852.00 

Fuel & Utilities 23,380.00 23,182.25 28,610.00 

Supplies & Drayage 4,320.00 3,759.24 6,905.00 

Maintenance 12,750.00 12,748.28 23,044.00 

(9 .880.00 )* (9 .880.00 )* 

$ 78,480.00 $ 78,478.15 $ 94,411.00 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

(Adult Ed.) $ 200.00 $ 126.00 $ 200.00 

ACQUISITION OF FIXED 
ASSETS (Formerly 

Outlay) $ 8,746.00 $ 8,396.90 $ 6,713.00 

PROGRAMS WITH OTHER 
SYSTEMS (Tuition 

Special Class) $ 600.00 $ 1,185.00 $ 1,200.00 



TOWN TOTALS $576,226.00 $567,401.23 $627,619.00 

Per Pupil Cost (593.44) (584.35) (644.37) 

*Public Law 874 16 . 840.00 16. 840 .00 -- 

GRAND TOTALS $593,066.00 $584,241.23 $627,619.00 



148 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Name 



STAFF ROSTER, JANUARY 1, 19 64 
Pos i t i on 



Robert L. Filbin 



Superintendent of Schools 



(Principal, Hartwell School, '58, '59, '60, 
•61, f 62; Principal, Smith School and Co- 
ordinator of Instruction, *62, '63.) 



Robert A. Leach 
Stefan Vogel 
Joan B. Warren 



Ap pointed 
1963 



Principal, Hanscom School 1959 

(Teacher: 1954-1959) 

Principal, Smith/Center Schools 1963 
(Teacher: 1959-1963) 

Principal, Hartwell School 1963 

(Teacher: 1951-1962) 
(Acting Principal, , 62, , 63) 



*0l i ve Bar r 
Barbara Bennett 
Joan Bennert 
Elizabeth Bjork 
Rita Blackburn 
Harriett Butz 
Alfred Callahan 
Mary Carr 
Roger Cederlund 
Francis Churchill 
Julia Cole 
David Conrad 

Priscilla Cowell 
Richard Cowell 
Jo Ellen Crawford 
Robert Cummings 
Helaine Davidson 
Eleanor Davies 
Sheila Deitchman 
Frances Doughty 
George Drake 



Carol Dunn 

Ellen Dwinell 

Donald Ford 

Diane Furber 

Donna Giberti 

Sally Stephenson Glass 

Kenneth Greenblatt 

Mary Griffing 

Ronald Hadge 

Christopher Hale 

Susan Hall 

Jill Holter 



Home Economics 

Director of Mu sic 

Team G 

Leader, Team G 

Team R 

Physical Education 

Manual Arts 

Mathematics 

Science, Mathematics 

Manual Arts, Science 

Leader, Team B 

English, Senior Teacher, 

Grade 6 
Grade 1, D Cluster 
History, Department Head 
Team N 
Team 
Team Y 
Grade 4, 
Grade 1 , 
Libr ar ian 
Administrative Assistant 

(Teacher: 1954-1962) 
History, F Cluster 
Grade 3, C Cluster 
Director of Science 
Team 0, Senior Teacher 
Mathemat ics 

Grade 3, E Cluster Chairman 
Mathematics 
Grade 2, E Cluster 
Mathematics 
Sc ience 

Grade 3, E Cluster 
Kindergarten 



Cluster Chairman 
D Cluster 



1963 
1958 
1961 
1958 
1962 
1963 
1959 
1963 
1962 
1963 
1955 

1962 
1962 
1962 
1963 
1962 
1963 
1961 
1963 
1959 
1962 

1963 
1961 
1959 
1956 
1963 
1961 
1959 
1962 
1959 
1962 
1963 
1963 



149 



SCHOOLS 



Name 



Position 



Helen Horn 
Joan Hulme 
Marian Hume 
Fred Iosue 
Judith Iversen 
Susan Jacobson 
Phyllis Johnson 
Catherine Jones 
Neil Jorgensen 
Susan Clark Jorgenson 
Linda Kahn 
Elizabeth Kellogg 
Eleanor Kemler 
Carole Kennedy 
Patsy Lamb 
Ann Lessard 
Joseph Lessard 
Alan Lokensgard 
Ruth Mahoney 



Marguerite Bottai 

Maloney 
Barbara Marley 
Phyllis McKenney 
Elaine Messias 
*Cecelia Miles 
Wendy Miller 
Barbara Morris 
William Nockles 
Ann Paranya 
Wanda Pearle 

Albert Reed 
Marion Remer 
Sheila Robbins Reid 
Charlotte Rothstein 

*Adrienne Rubin 
Janet Saks 
Doris Salak 
Richard Salinger 
Mary Salvucci 
Elizabeth Sampson 
Myrna Schreibman 
Anthony Sharkey 
Sarah Ott Shoemaker 
Michael Sims 
Augusta Sisk 
Mary Slater 
Nancy Soscia 
Kathleen Spofford 

*Julie Steckel 
Evelyn Stevenson 

*Jane Stewart 
Gretchen Stubbins 
Adelaide Sugarman 



Director of Ar t 
History 

Team Y 

Physical Education 
Grade 3, C Cluster 
Team 

Senior Teacher, Team B 
Libr ar ian 
Science 
Team G 
Team B 
Team G 

Grade 2, E Cluster 
History 

Senior Teacher, Team G 
Team Leader, Y 
Leader, Team N 
Mathemat ic s 

English, Grade 7 Level 
Chairman 



Leader , Team 

Team B 

Senior Teacher, Team N 

Team N 

Music 

Team B 

Grade 5, B Cluster Chairman 

Grade 4 

English, Department Head 

English, History; 

F Cluster Chairman 

Director of Physical Education 

Team 

Music 

Remedial Reading 

Remedial Reading 

Senior Teacher, Team R 

Supernumerary 

Team N 

Home Economics 

Team 

Team G 

Art 

Team Y 

French 

Director of Testing 

Art 

Art 

Grade 4, C Cluster 

Mus ic 

Kindergarten 

Team R 

Team Y 

Team Y, Senior Teacher 



Appointed 

1959 
1963 
1960 
1959 
1963 
1963 
1946 
1959 
1961 
1961 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1960 
1959 
1960 
1963 

1958 

1959 
1962 
1957 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1959 
1963 
1949 

1959 
1953 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1959 
1962 
1959 
1959 
1955 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1962 
1962 
1946 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1961 
1960 
1962 
1961 



150 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Name 



Position 



Florence Sullivan 
Ruth Sundber g 
Ann Sutherland 
Sally Todd 

*Phebe Tonseth 
Lorraine Torode 

♦Geneva Torrey 
Ronald Trudeau 
Pamela Tuttle 
Eugenie Wallas 

♦Robert Weinberg 
Hel en Wiser 
Marilyn Woodall 
Ruth Zollinger 



Grade 5, B Cluster 
English, History; F Cluster 
French 

Grade 1, D Cluster Chairman 
Li brar i an 

Physical Education 
Remedial Reading 
Mus ic 
French 

Grade 5, B Cluster 
Speech Therapist 
Physical Education 
Grade 1, D Cluster 
English, French; Grade 6 
Team Leader 



Appo in ted 



1963 
1959 
1961 
1961 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1961 
1963 
1963 
1962 
1963 
1963 

1959 



Part-time teachers 



STAFF MEMBERS TERMINATED JUNE 19 6 3 



Priscilla Allen 

Carol Bacon 

Diana Peabody Bell 

Dorothy Clawson 

Lynn Burrows Donaldson 
♦Roberta Flexer 
♦Irma Flor i o 

Mary Geoghegan 

Roberta Goldman 

Persis Goodnow 

Emmy Groeneveld Crosley 

Margery McCullough 
Gual t ier i 

W. Donald Hubbard 

Nancy Iosue 

Virginia Judson 

Carolyn Marks 

Elizabeth Morin 

Marianne Heidt 

Ocker bloom 

Mary Pierce 
♦John L. Reed 

Esther Rosenthal 

Suzanne Seidel 

Carolyn Shohet 

Elena Werlin 



History, English 

Team B 

Team B 

Hi story 

Team N 

Math 

Grade 5 

Grade 2 

Grade 4 

Grade 1 , 

Grade 3 , 



Cluster Chairman 
Cluster Chairman 



Physical Education 

Math 

Physical Education 

Team G 

Grade 4 

Grade 5 

Math 

Team N 

Sc ience 

French 

Art 

Kindergarten 

Grade 1 



1962 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1961 
1962 
1950 
1962 
1960 
1959 
1959 

1962 
1961 
1959 
1962 
1962 
1959 , 1962 

1957 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1961 
1962 
1961 



Part-time teachers 



151 



SCHOOLS 





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152 



REGIONAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

REPORT 



to the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1962-1963 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ellen DeN. Cannon, Chairman 
Howard W # Emmons, Vice Chairman 
Joseph E. Brown 
James M. Jagger 
Virginia K. Kirshner 
Henry M. Morgan 



Continuance of high quality 
the rapid growth of the high sch 
greatest concern. The members 
mittee, appointed by the Regiona 
were appointed in April to the R 
for the third stage of building 
this committee are Mrs. John M. 
Clark and Mr, Edward G, Kaelber 
Stanley Taub, Mr. Burleigh Cruik 
S. Cobb of Sudbury. Mr, Cobb r 
business pressures and was repla 
Schmalz. Mr. Stephen E. Grand 
Permanent Building Committee was 



education in the face of 
ool population is our 
of a Building Study Com- 
1 School Committee in 1962, 
egional Building Committee 
construction. Members of 
Barnaby, Mr. Richard C. B, 
of Lincoln, and Mrs. Z. 
shank, Jr. and Mr. Edward 
esigned in June because of 
ced by Mr. Richard A. 
e, Jr. of the Sudbury 

appointed as consultant. 






The School Committee voted on October 22, 1963, to 
borrow $40,000 for planning money. This vote was approved 
by both towns at special town meetings held in November. 
Plans will now progress as rapidly as possible to insure 
the opening of the new addition by September, 1966. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
members of the Building Committee for the exceptionally 
good job they have performed in the initial phases of this 
project. We have every confidence that they will see 
that we have as efficient and economical a school as possi- 
ble. 

There was considerable discussion at the November 
Lincoln Town Meeting about the future of the high school 
and whether Lincoln should consider a separate high school. 
The Lincoln members of the School Committee assured the 
citizens present that this addition was essential now and 
that the School Committee has considered and will continue 
to study this problem very carefully. 

The purchase of the Caroline E. Waite property has 
been settled. This gives the Regional District approxi- 
mately 93 acres of suitable land which is considered suffi- 
cient to support a school population of up to 3,000. 



154 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Because there are so many new citizens in both towns 
a copy of the Agreement between the Towns of Sudbury and 
Lincoln and a brief history of the region follow this re- 
port. 

For the past three years representatives from the 
Finance Committees of Lincoln and Sudbury have met with us 
during budget preparation meetings. To understand the 
philosophy behind the budget, the Sudbury Finance Committee 
appointed a sub -comm i t t e e to attend all our regularly 
scheduled meetings. Following each meeting an opportun- 
ity to speak was given to these representatives and to 
any other citizens in attendance. This procedure has 
been mutually beneficial. 

Golf, track and tennis have been added to the list of 
varsity sports. Tennis is played on the Sudbury town 
courts and golf is played at the Nashawtuc Country Club 
where we have been given the privilege of using their 
course as our home base. 

The decision on whether or not to add football to 
the varsity program was postponed because capital costs 
could not be secured before the 1964 budget was made 
final. A decision will be made in the coming year. 

The first of a series of tours of the school was 
held in October for the Sudbury Garden Club, the Thursday 
Garden Club of Sudbury, and the Lincoln Garden Club. Mem- 
bers were shown the building by student guides and visited 
classes, followed by a question period in the library and 
refreshments. This was a successful experience which we 
plan to repeat with other groups. These clubs have 
generously undertaken to landscape the courtyard and have 
been ably assisted by the Class of 1963 whose class gift 
was the new asphalt walk across the courtyard. We deeply 
appreciate what they have accomplished. 

The Committee continues to meet with as many depart- 
ments of the high school as possible throughout the year, 
feeling that these discussions are valuable in understand- 
ing the school's problems and in planning for the future. 
This past year we met with nine departments. 

We are proud of our students whose performance con- 
tinues to be excellent. We are also proud of our admin- 
istration and faculty whose loyalty and spirit are largely 
responsible for the high calibre school which we feel we 
are fortunate to have. 

155 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



Agreement between the Towns of Lincoln 
and Sudbury, Massachusetts, with respect to the 
formation of a Regional School District 



This Agreement entered into pursuant to Chapter 71 
of the General Laws of Massachusetts as amended 

WITNESSETH that 



WHEREAS the Towns of Lincoln and Sudbury desire to 
form a Regional School District under provision of said 
Chapter 71 ; and 

WHEREAS such Towns desire to enter into an Agreement 
provided by said Chapter 71. 

NOW THEREFORE, in consideration of the foregoing and 
of the mutual promises herein contained, the Towns of 
Lincoln and Sudbury do mutually agree as follows: 

1 , Number. Composition. Method of Selection and 
Terms of Office of the Members of the Regional District 
School Committee . The powers, duties and liabilities of 
the Regional School District shall be vested in and exer- 
cised by a Regional District School Committee. Such Com- 
mittee shall consist of six members of which three shall 
be elected by the town of Lincoln and three by the town of 
Sudbury, except that forthwith following acceptance of 
this Agreement by both Towns respectively, a joint com- 
mittee in each member Town composed of the Selectmen and 
School Committee members of such Town shall appoint the 
Regional District School Committee members from such Town 
to hold office until their successors are elected and qual- 
ified. At the next following Annual Town Election of 
each member Town, the first succeeding members of the Re- 
gional District School Committee from each member Town 
shall be elected by such Town, one member to hold office 
for a term of one year, one member to hold office for a 
term of two years and one member to hold office for a term 
of three years, and in each case until their successors 
are elected and qualified. Thereafter at each Annual Town 
Election of each member Town there shall be elected one 
member for a term of three years and until his successor 
is elected and qualified. If a vacancy occurs during the 
term of office of a member of the Regional District School 
Committee, a Committee from such member's Town made up of 
the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, the Chairman of 
the local School Committee and the remaining member or 



156 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

members of the Regional District School Committee from 
such Town shall promptly appoint a successor to serve un- 
til the next annual election of such member's Town, and 
until his successor is elected and qualified. At the 
next Annual Town Election following the occurrence of such 
vacancy, a successor to serve for the balance of the un- 
expired term, if any, shall be elected. The quorum of 
the Regional District School Committee shall be four, of 
whom at least two shall be from each member Town. Prompt- 
ly upon the appointment of the initial members, and there- 
after upon the election of successors, the Regional Dis- 
trict School Committee shall organize by the selection by 
ballot from their number of a Chairman and by the appoint- 
ment of a Secretary and a Treasurer who may be the same 
person and need not be members of the Committee. 

2. Location of Regional District School . The 
Regional District School shall be located in the northeast 
portion of the Town of Sudbury within a radius of two and 
one-half miles of the junction of the two Towns. 

3. Type of Regional District School . The Regional 
District School shall be a Senior High School consisting of 
Grades 9 through 12, inclusive. 

The Regional District School Committee is hereby 
authorized to establish and maintain State-aided Vocation- 
al Education, acting as trustees therefor, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 74, General Laws, and Acts 
mandatory thereto, or dependent thereon; if the Regional 
District School Committee deems it desirable. 

4 . Student Membership - Transfer Date - Tuition 
Pup ils . The membership of the Regional School District 
shall include all students residing in the member Towns in 
Grades 9 through 12 educated at the expense of the member 
Town or the Regional School District. 

Jurisdiction over, and responsibility for, the educa- 
tional needs of such membership shall not be transferred 
from the local School Committees of the member Towns to 
the Regional District School Committee until the Student 
Transfer Date which shall be September 1, 1956, unless 
prior thereto the Regional District School Committee and 
the local School Committees of each of the member Towns 
agree upon the establishment of an earlier Student Transfer 
Date. 

On the Student Transfer Date, the Regional District 

157 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



School Committee shall assume exclusive jurisdiction over, 
and responsibility for, the educational needs of the mem- 
bership except that students of a member Town who attended 
High Schools outside of their Town on a tuition basis, at 
their Town's expense, prior to the Fall of the year that 
the Regional District School is prepared to accept stu- 
dents and who would enter Grades 11 and 12 in the Fall of 
such year, may finish their High School education at such 
High Schools outside of their Town at the Regional School 
District's expense. Notwithstanding the other provisions 
of this Agreement relating to the apportionment of opera- 
ting expenses, there shall be apportioned to the respect- 
ive member Towns, the entire amount, if any, by which the 
tuition paid by the Regional District School Committee for 
the students from such town exceeds the average per pupil 
operating cost of the Regional School District as deter- 
mined by said Committee exclusive of such tuition pupils 
multiplied by the number of such tuition pupils from such 
town . 

Students residing outside the Regional School Dis- 
trict may attend the Regional District School upon the 
approval of the Regional District School Committee and the 
payment of tuition as determined by such Committee, 

Pursuant to such terms and conditions as it may pre- 
scribe the Regional District School Committee may author- 
ize the use of Regional School District facilities by mem- 
ber towns or citizens thereof for such purposes as the 
said Committee may deem in keeping with the civic purpose 
of such facilities, provided no use may be authorized un- 
der this paragraph which would interfere with the use of 
such facilities for the purposes of the Regional School 
District . 

5 . Apportionment of Expenses and Other Items . The 
several costs of construction, and operation of the Dis- 
trict and payments of principal and interest on its bonds 
or other evidence of indebtedness shall be apportioned as 
follows : 

(a) Apportionment Factors Defined . The apportion- 
ment factor of each member Town during the academic year, 
starting in September of one year and ending in June of 
the next, shall mean the ratio of the pupils from such 
Town in Grades 9 through 12, inclusive, receiving educa- 
tion at the member Town's or Regional District's expense 
to the total number of pupils in such grades in both mem- 
ber Towns so receiving education. During the interval 



158 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



between such academic years, the apportionment factor shall 
be the same as that at the close of the academic year next 
preceding such interval. 

( b ) Funded Construction Costs and Interest Thereon . 
A sum equal to each installment of principal and interest 
upon bonds and other evidences of indebtedness of the 
Regional School District, other than indebtedness incurred 
in anticipation of revenue, shall be apportioned to each 
member Town on the basis of its apportionment factor at 
October 1 of the year preceding the due date of such in- 
stallment. The Treasurers of each member Town shall pay 
to the Treasurer of the District the amount of such Town's 
share of each installment of principal or interest at 
least thirty days before its due date, provided that if be- 
cause the date of any such payment shall precede the Annu- 
al Meeting of the member Town the Treasurer may not legally 
make such payment, payment shall be made immediately after 
such Annual Meeting. 

(c) Operating Expenses . Operating expenses shall 
include all items of expense not included under Section 5 
(b). The Treasurer of each member Town shall pay to the 
Treasurer of the District the amount of each member Town's 
share of operating expenses (the adjusted apportioned 
amount certified pursuant to Section 9 hereof, less the 
amount included therein for debt service) in four equal 
installments on the 15th day of March, May, August and 
November, provided that if, because the date of any such 
installment shall precede the Annual Meeting of a member 
Town the Treasurer of such Town may not legally make such 
payment, payment shall be made immediately after such 
Annual Meeting. 

(d) Payments Not to Exceed Budget . The aggregate 
amounts required to be paid by each member Town under para- 
graphs (b) and (c) of this Section shall in no event ex- 
ceed in any fiscal year the amount of the annual budget 
certified to such Town under General Laws, Chapter 71 of 
Section 16B, as amended, and Section 9 of this Agreement. 

(e) Adjustments . The operating expenses shall be 
apportioned to each member Town and shall be increased or 
decreased by adjustment or otherwise as provided in Sec- 
tion 9 , 

(f) Apportionment of State and Federal Aid . To 
apportion the State aid received by the Regional School 
District as a school construction grant, under Section 9, 



159 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



Chapter 645, Acts of 1948, as amended, there shall be 
credited against each member Town's share of funded con- 
struction costs, exclusive of interest thereon, as appor- 
tioned under Paragraph (b) of this Section, an amount 
equal to the amount that each member Town would have re- 
ceived separately from the State, at the time that the 
amount of the construction grant payable to the Regional 
School District is fixed and determined, as a construction 
grant for an approved school project in each separate mem- 
ber Town, the total construction cost of which would be 
equal to such Town's apportioned share of funded construc- 
tion costs, exclusive of interest thereon against which 
this credit is to be applied. The balance of the State 
aid received by the Regional School District as a con- 
struction grant, and all other sums received by the Dis- 
trict as Federal or State aid shall be credited to each 
member Town in the same proportion as the cost, interest 
or expense are apportioned with respect to which such aid 
is granted. 

(g) Notice of Debt Authorization . Within two days 
after the date on which the Regional District School Com- 
mittee authorizes the incurring of debt, other than tem- 
porary debt in anticipation of revenue to be received 
from member Towns, said Committee shall cause written 
notice of the date of said authorization, the sum author- 
ized and the general purpose or purposes for authorizing 
such debt, to be mailed by registered mail to the Chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen and Chairman of the Finance 
Committee of each member Town at their last known perman- 
ent address in such Town. 



( h) Apportionment Provisions Applicable Forthwith . 
The foregoing provisions of this Section 5 shall be appli- 
cable forthwith on execution of this Agreement and are in- 
tended to apply to expenses of the District prior to com- 
pletion of the School as well as thereafter, 

6. Transportation . Transportation to and from 
the Regional District School and any other transportation 
for Regional School purposes shall be the responsibility 
of the Regional School District and its cost shall be an 
ordinary operating expense. 

7 . Separation - Admission of Other Towns . No 
member Town may separate from the District except as here- 
in provided. If no bonds or other evidence of indebted- 
ness have been issued by the Regional School District or 



160 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



if all such bonds or other indebtedness shall have been 
paid in full or the member Town which desires to separate 
shall have paid its share of installments of principal and 
interest of such indebtedness to date and shall have made 
irrevocable deposit in the name of the District with a 
Massachusetts bank or trust company having combined capi- 
tal or surplus of not less than Five Million Dollars 
($5,000,000) of funds for the purpose sufficient to meet 
such Town's share of any future maturing installments of 
principal and interest on any such bonds or other indebted- 
ness, such Town may, upon the giving of at least one year's 
written notice of its intention to do so pursuant to a 
majority vote of the voters present and voting on the 
question at an Annual or Special Meeting of such Town 
called for the purpose, withdraw from the Regional School 
District at the conclusion of the School term normally 
scheduled to end in the month of June. The Regional 
School District may withdraw the funds so deposited and 
use the same only for the payment of the share of interest 
and principal on its bonds or other evidences of indebted- 
ness, which would otherwise have been apportioned to and 
paid by such withdrawing Town. Until such future matur- 
ing installments have been discharged, however, the with- 
drawing Town shall, to the extent thereof, remain liable 
with respect to such bonds or other indebtedness as if it 
had not withdrawn. The withdrawing Town's share of future 
maturing principal and interest shall be computed on the 
basis of its apportionment factor with credit for State 
aid as provided in Section 5 (f ) at the time of giving of 
such not ice . 

By an amendment of this Agreement adopted by each 
member Town in accordance with Section 8 and complying 
with the proviso therein contained, any other Town or 
Towns may be admitted to the Regional School District upon 
adoption as therein provided of such amendments and upon 
acceptance of the Agreement as so amended and also upon 
compliance with such provisions of law as may be applica- 
ble and such terms as may be set forth in such amendment. 

8. Amendment of Agreement . This Agreement may be 
amended in any manner approved by a majority vote of those 
present and voting on the question at an Annual Meeting or 
a Special Meeting called for the purpose in the member 
Towns, provided that no such amendment shall adversely 
affect any obligation previously contracted by the Region- 
al School District or affect in any adverse manner the 
liability of the Regional School District or of the res- 
pective member Towns on or with respect to the payment of 



161 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



pal of or interest on any bonds or other evidences 
BDtedness issued by the Regional School District, 
led that this provision shall not prevent the ad- 
m i a of new towns to the District and the reapportion- 
ment accordingly of that part of the cost of construction 
ted by bonds or notes of the District then out- 
anding and of interest thereon. 

A proposal for amendment may be initiated by the 
Board of Selectmen of a member Town, by a majority of all 
the members of the Regional District School Committee or 
by a signed petition bearing the signatures of five nun- 
rod (500) registered voters of the District, provided the 
petition shall contain the signatures of at least one hun- 
dred (100) registered voters from each member Town, Said 
petition shall also contain, at the end thereof, a certi- 
fication by the Town Clerks of the respective member Towns 
as to the number of signatures on the petition which appear 
to be the names of registered voters from that Town. Any 
such proposal for amendment shall be presented to the 
Secretary of the Regional School District Committee who 
shall mail or deliver a notice in writing to the Board of 
Selectmen of each of the member Towns that a proposal to 
amend this Agreement has been received and shall enclose 
a copy of such proposal (without the signatures in the 
case of a proposal by petition). The Selectmen in each 
member Town shall include in the warrant for the next 
Annual Town Meeting or for a Special Town Meeting called 
for the purpose an article stating the proposal or the sub- 
stance thereof. Any vote to adopt or reject the proposal 
shall be by a written ballot. When a majority of those 
present and voting upon the question in all the member 
Towns shall have approved a proposal for amendment, said 
amendment shall be adopted thereby and thereupon becomes 
a part of this Agreement. 

9 . Preparation and Submission of Budgets . Within 
sixty days after the Regional District School Committee is 
organized, it shall prepare a reasonably detailed budget 
of expenses for the balance of the calendar year. Copies 
such budget shall be submitted for approval to the 
inance Committee and the Selectmen of the member Towns. 
The amount of the budget thus approved shall be apportione 
between the member Towns according to their respective 
apportionment factors as of the preceding October 1st and 
shall then be delivered by the Regional District School 
committee to its Treasurer for certification of the res- 
pective share thereof to each member Town. The sums thus 
tified shall be payable by each member Town to the Re- 
District School Committee only from funds appropri- 

162 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



ated by each member Town for such purpose, if any. 

Thereafter, at the opening of each academic year in 
September, the Regional District School Committee shall 
as promptly as practicable proceed with the preparation 
of a tentative budget for the ensuing calendar year in- 
cluding provision for any installment of principal or in- 
terest to become due in such year on any bonds or other 
evidences of indebtedness of the District. Such tenta- 
tive budget shall be in reasonable detail, including the 
amount payable under the following classification of ex- 
penses and such other classifications as may be necessary; 

General Control, including salaries of the Superin- 
tendent, Attendance Officers, Census Enumerators, and all 
personnel employed in the Superintendent's Office; School 
Committee Expense, traveling expense, supplies, postage, 
and other miscellaneous expense. 

Expenses of instruction, including salaries of 
teachers, principals and other instructional personnel, 
clerks in the principal 's office, traveling expenses, 
stationery, postage and other miscellaneous expenses of 
the principal's office, textbooks and instructional sup- 
plies. 

Operation of School Plant, including salaries of 
custodial personnel, fuel, custodial supplies, telephone 
and other miscellaneous expenses of operation. 

Maintenance of School Plant, including all expendi- 
tures made for the installation, repair or replacement of 
grounds, buildings or equipment. 

Auxiliary Agencies, including libraries, health ser- 
vices, transportation, tuition, physical education, lunch- 
rooms and miscellaneous expenses. 

Outlay, including expenses for alterations of grounds 
and buildings; and new equipment such as furniture, fur- 
nishings, instructional equipment and laboratory apparatus 

Vocational Education, including tuition to State 
aided Vocational Schools. 

Debt Service, including principal and interest pay- 
ments . 

All non-recurring expenditures shall be itemized. 
From the total of said budget there shall be deducted any 

163 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



irplus of receipts for the preceding calendar year, ex- 
ing those received and reserved for special purposes, 
over said cost and expenses for that year. Upon the 
preparation of such tentative budget and not later than 

tveaber 1 in any year, copies of the tentative budget 
shall be presented and explained to the Finance Committee 
in each member Town and thereafter, but prior to November 
15, the Regional District School Committee shall hold a 
public hearing in each member Town after posting in at 
least three public places at least three days in advance 
thereof in such town, a notice signed by the Secretary of 
the Regional District School Committee stating the time, 
place and purpose of the hearing at which it shall present 
the proposed Regional School tentative budget and shall 
answer any reasonable inquiries with respect thereto. 
Promptly after the holdings of such hearings, the Regional 
District School Committee shall meet for the purpose of 
adopting a final budget with such modifications in their 
tentative budget as they may consider necessary or desir- 
able. Failure to give notice or hold hearings as herein 
prescribed shall not invalidate the proceedings for adopt- 
ing a budget. On or before December 1 of such year, the 
Committee shall adopt a budget, and apportion the amount 
thereof between the member Towns according to their res- 
pective apportionment factors as of the preceding October 
1st, except that excess tuition payments, if any, shall be 
apportioned according to the third paragraph of Section 4. 

Such apportioned amounts shall then be adjusted in 
respect of the operating expenses (exclusive of such excess 
tuition payments) of the second calendar year preceding the 
year for which such budget is being prepared to the end 
that the operating expenses of such second preceding calen- 
dar year shall finally be apportioned to the member Towns 
on the basis of average membership. The amount of such 
further adjustment for each member Town shall be the differ 
ence between that Town's share of such operating expenses 
(a) according to the apportionment factor previously used 
to apportion such operating expenses and (b) according to 
its apportionment factor based on the average membership 
of Regional School District for said year. If (a) is 
greater than (b) the amount of the difference shall be sub- 
tracted from the share of the budget previously apportioned 
to such member Town; if (a) is less than (b) the amount of 
the difference shall be added to the amount of the budget 
previously apportioned to such member Town, For the pur- 
pose of this Section "membership" shall be as defined in 
Section 4 and "average membership" shall be computed as 
prescribed by Section 8 of Chapter 72 of Massachusetts 
General Laws (Ter. Ed.) for the combined periods of such 

164 






SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



calendar year which are included in any regular academic 
year . 

The budget thus adopted shall then be delivered to 
the Treasurer for the certification of such adjusted ap- 
portioned amounts to the respective member Towns. 

10. Subcommittees . The Regional District School 
Committee may from time to time create subcommittees, the 
members of which need not be members of the Regional Dis- 
trict School Committee, and assign to such committees, sub- 
ject to the supervision of the Regional District School 
Committee, such advisory functions as the Regional District 
School Committee may determine. Without limiting the 
generality of the foregoing, the Regional District School 
Committee may, to assist it in the construction of the Re- 
gional School Building, appoint a Building Committee to 
advise it with respect to plans, specifications, appoint- 
ment of architects, engineers, the letting of contracts, 
the supervision of construction, and any other assistance 
which the Regional District School Committee may desire. 

11. Agreement Not to Limit Statutory Powers . Except 
as otherwise expressly provided herein, no provision of 
this Agreement shall in any manner be deemed to limit any 
power now or hereafter conferred by law upon the Regional 
School District or the Regional District School Committee 
established hereby. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Agreement has been executed, 
approved and accepted as hereinbefore provided as of the 
28th day of January, 1954. 

Regional School District Regional School District 
Planning Board for the Planning Board for the 

Town of Sudbury Town of Lincoln 

By Wilfred Joseph Allen By Ernest P. Neumann 

Elizabeth B. Harding Malcolm L. Donaldson 

Luther M. Child, Jr. Victor A. Lutnicki 

Ap proved: 

The Commonwealth of Mass. The Commonwealth of Mass. 
Department of Education Emergency Finance Board 



By John J. Desmond, Jr. 



Jan, 28, 1954 



By Salvatore E. Aloisi 
Jan. 28, 1954 Edmund S. Zelazi 



165 



William A. Noonan 
Herman B. Dine 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



History 

Prior to the formation of the Lincoln-Sudbury Region- 
al High School District in 1954, Lincoln sent its high 
school pupils to Concord or Weston as tuition students and 
Sudbury operated its own high school. Each town had 
about 100 high school pupils, and the towns were growing 
at about the same rate and had similar aspirations for 
their children. The local high school in Sudbury was too 
small to be of the desired high quality in spite of its 
high per pupil cost, and a number of Sudbury parents tui- 
tioned their children to private or other public high 
schools, while for Lincoln the satisfactory quality of edu- 
cation was obtained but with a loss of any voice in the 
school development. 

By the early 1950*s it became clear that changes were 
necessary. Through special town-appointed committees an 
agreement for the formation of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
High School District was drawn up - and was adopted by the 
two towns at their town elections in 1954. 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School is adminis- 
tered by a committee composed of six unpaid members, three 
elected from each town, for a term of three years. The 
committee meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of every 
month at 8:00 P.M. in the Superintendent's office at the 
corner of Lincoln and Concord Roads in Sudbury. All meet- 
ings are open to the public unless designated as an execu- 
tive session. The committee has the same powers as a lo- 
cal school committee, but in addition it may acquire pro- 
perty and incur debt under certain specified conditions. 
The committee appoints the Superintendent and determines 
all general school policy, and it appoints the teaching 
staff and all other school personnel upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Superintendent. Although the Regional School 
Committee operates under State law, it works very closely 
with the Selectmen and Finance Committees of both towns. 

Financial support for the operating costs of the 
Regional High School derives from local property taxes, 
and state and Federal aid. Financial support for capital 
expenditures is derived from local property taxes, State 
aid and bond issues. Because Lincoln and Sudbury belong 
to a regional district the Towns receive considerably more 
State aid than they would otherwise. The region receives 
100% reimbursement on transportation for those residing 
lj miles or more from the school and 50% on the needs for 
the physically handicapped. 

166 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

The Regional School receives Federal aid under two 
public laws. Under Public Law 864 the Regional School is 
reimbursed 50% on state approved costs for guidance testing 
and equipment for language, science and mathematics. Be- 
cause Lincoln and Sudbury are located in a so-called feder- 
ally impacted area, the Regional School is reimbursed under 
Public Law 874, according to a student ratio pattern. Mon- 
ey received under Public Law 874 is unrestricted and dis- 
bursed at the discretion of the Regional School Committee. 

The total cost of the high school is apportioned each 
year to the two towns according to their respective number 
of pup ils . 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Committee 
bases its policy on the premise that the townspeople of 
Lincoln and Sudbury want their children to be well pre- 
pared to meet the intense competition of present day socie- 
ty. To gain this advantage requires a broad, comprehen- 
sive program that is above average in what it demands from 
the student as well as in what it provides for the student. 



167 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



THE LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Treasurer's Report 
December 31, 1963 

Total cash balance, January 1, 1963 

District Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 



Rece ip t s : 

Lincoln Assessment 
Sudbury Assessment 
State reimbursement: 

Building construction 
Tr ansportation 
* Miscellaneous income 
U. S. Treasury Bills 



Disbursements : 

Operating expense 

Land acquisition 

Debt Service - interest 

- principal 
U. S. Treasury Bills 
Building Construction No. 2 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 

Miscellaneous Income 



Books 

Mass. Withholding 

Tax - Employer's 

reimbursement 
Interest on U, S. 

Treasury Bills 
Industrial arts 
Library fines, etc 
Tuition 
Towel s 
Telephone com- 

miss ion 
Use of building 
Vending machines 
Miscellaneous 



192,960.99 
525,262.08 

64,154.53 

68, 792.31 

7,620.44 

298 .422.81 



675 


,738 


.70 


8 


,000 


.00 


55 


,489 


.50 


130 


,000 


.00 


298 


,422 


.81 


9 


,817 


.01 



$58.75 



57.39 

1 ,577.19 

543.61 

22.35 

2,004.22 

2, 601 .00 

123.28 
94.00 
88.80 

449 .85 
$7 , 620.44 

Outlay 



Cash balance, January 1, 1963 
Receipts (from P.L. 874) 
Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 



$8 ,940.00 
8.940.00 



$ 199.971.16 



$ 190,084.19 



1 .157.213.16 
$1 , 347,297.35 



1.177.468.02 
$ 169.829.33 



168 






SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Cafeteria Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 $ 1,425.98 

Receipts $ 35,348.15 

Disbursements 35,432.75 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 1 , 341 . 38 

At hie t i c Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 $ 34.67 

Receipts $ 789.08 

Disbursements 8 22.00 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 1 . 75 

Federal Reimbursement Fund. P t L, 864 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 $ 845.63 

Receipts $ 9,792.95 

Disbursements 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 10 . 638 . 58 

Federal Reimbursement Fund. P. L. 874 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 $ 6,895.70 

Receipts . $ 20,266.00 

Disbursements : 

Transfer to outlay 8,940.00 

Other expenditures 6.963.93 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 11 . 257 . 77 

Adult Education Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 $ 382.99 

Receipts $ 800.00 

Disbursements 816.00 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 366.99 

Music Scholarship Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1963 $ 302.00 

Receipts $ 318.20 

Disbursements 200 . 00 

Cash balance, December 31, 1963 420 . 20 

Total cash balance, December 31, 1963 $ 193 . 856 . 00 



169 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1963 

Assets 



Cash : 

First National Bank 
Waltham Savings Bank 



$193,435.80 
420.20 



Total Assets 



Liabilities and Reserves 



Appropriation balances: 
Non-Revenue : 

Building Construction No. 2 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Construction cost 

Transportation 
Federal Reimbursement, P. L. 864 
Federal Reimbursement, P. L. 874 
Surplus Revenue 
Revolving Funds: 

Caf eter ia 

Athletic 

Adult Education 

Scholarship 

Total Liabilities and Reserves 



$ 193.856.00 
$ 193.856.00 



$ 1,891.13 

64,154.53 
68, 792.31 
10,638.58 
11,257.77 
34,991.36 

1 , 341.38 

1.75 

366,99 

420.20 

$ 193.856.00 



Outstanding Debt 

2.2% School Bonds payable $ 5,000 May 1, 

1964-1975 inclusive 
2.4% School Bonds payable $20,000 Nov, 1, 

1964-1974 inclusive 
2.4% School Bonds payable $50,000 Nov. 1, 

1964-1975 inclusive 
3.7% School Bonds payable $50,000 May 1, 

1964-1980 inclusive 
2.2% Certified Notes payable $5,000 Nov. 15, 

1964-1965 inclusive, and $3,000 Nov, 15, 

1966 



$ 60,000.00 
220,000.00 
600,000.00 
850,000.00 

13.000.00 
$1 , 743,000.00 



George B. Flint, Treasurer 



170 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the School Committee: 

This is the eighth Annual Report of the Superintendent 
of Schools regarding the activities of Lincoln-Sudbury Re- 
gional High School, and it reflects both the strengths and 
successes as well as the shor t -com ings and needs for the 
year s ahead . 

As the school has grown during the past years at an 
average annual rate of 92 students from an original enroll- 
ment of 247, the organizational pattern and administrative 
and supervisory needs have been increased and, therefore, 
changed. The subject-matter department chairmen have been 
given an expanded scope of responsibility for curriculum 
improvement and revision, staff recruitment and departmen- 
tal policy making. Our department chairmen, like the rest 
of us, are human and also because of the subject-matter 
areas represented, all of them have not projected their de- 
partmental needs on an "equalized" basis. However, the 
consideration of our building expansion has caused certain 
of our supervisory staff to give very serious thought to 
the years ahead and to the needs of their respective de- 
partments. Currently, these are being considered for our 
building expansion. In many instances school committee 
members, administrative staff members, department chairmen, 
and classroom teachers have visited many of the better 
school systems throughout the United States to observe and 
evaluate modern programs and techniques of secondary school 
education. To mention only a few of the contacts and vis- 
itations made by our representatives the following can be 
cited: Palo Alto, California; Blackwell, Oklahoma; Cor- 
vallis, Portland, and Eugene, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; 
Chicago, Evanston, and Winnetka, Illinois; Melbourne and 
Peniellas County, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Richmond and 
MacLean, Virginia; Washington, D. C.; Mt . Vernon, New York; 
and Darien, Connecticut. From these visitations to schools 
where newer systems and programs are in effect, members of 
our professional staff have acquired a first hand knowledge 
of and a basis to evaluate many of the newer educational 
advances. From these experiences, most of which have been 
possible through or by-products of Fellowships of the John 
Hay Program, our next building phase should reflect the 
best in modern educational facilities. Our ability to 
finance and support these will be the only controlling fact- 
or; the administration and the faculty will be ready with 
the program for the public and the School Committee to make 
the building facility possible. The final answer rests 

171 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



th you, the citizen, the parent and taxpayer, as to the 
Lnd of program your youth shall have] 

During the year, 1963, many activities and program in- 
vations were carried on at our high school and a relating 
of these by our high school principal, Dr, Leslie Tourville, 
foil ows : 

•'Our enrollment as of October 1, 1963, was 894 stu- 
dents. This school year, the organization of sections 
again reflects an enlarged student-teacher ratio which has 
been economically sound. There have been more large 
classes than is desirable , but we believe that our increas- 
ing total enrollment will enable us to schedule close to 
the desired maximum of 25 after completion of the next 
building stage. The administration will continue to 
achieve all possible economics but always consistent with 
the school's philosophy of a sound education for each stu- 
dent. 

'The curriculum of the school continues to reflect 
the many new developments of modern education. There has 
been updating of several of the subject levels in the past 
summer workshop, and further improvements are planned for 
each summer over a period of the next five years. Con- 
sistent with the revision of our syllabi has been the felt 
need of our teachers to return to graduate schools across 
the country for further stimulation, new insights, and new 
material for their classes. We again have teachers re- 
ceiving fellowship awards, attending summer institutes, and 
traveling abroad to add to their language and academic com- 
petence. This continuous training and professional im- 
provement represents a significant expenditure of their 
time and money which reflects much credit on the profes- 
sionalism of the Regional High School teaching staff. 

'The P. T. S. A., through the Student Exchange Com- 
mittee, has again raised funds and brought young people 
from foreign lands to our school. The work of the Ex- 
change Committee, has made a significant contribution to 
the life of the school, and we are most appreciative of 
the work of the citizens who have helped to make it such 
a success. 

'The achievement record of the school as measured by 
the post-secondary placement of our students continues at 
the past high level of about 80% as a total. Over 60% 
of the members of the class of 1963 were granted admission 
to 4-year colleges or universities, with an additional 20% 
going on to technical schools, two-year colleges, schools 

172 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



of nursing and business schools. Follow-up reports ob- 
tained from graduates reveal a high degree of staying 
power, and, in general, a high degree of satisfaction with 
the academic preparation and the variety of experiences 
which they enjoyed as students at "Regional". 

"The 20% of our students who do not go on to post- 
secondary training is a source of great concern to the 
School Committee, the Administration and to all of the 
faculty as well as to the members of the Guidance Depart- 
ment. We are keenly aware of the restricted future of 
students who have little skill in a market where the de- 
mand for unskilled labor has almost disappeared. It is 
true that some of the 20% mentioned above include our girls 
who have received business training as clerk-typists, and 
for the competent students there are jobs waiting. How- 
ever, we do have a group of students who lack motivation 
and academic ability and in some cases are potential drop- 
outs. These students enter the Armed Services or obtain 
jobs requiring no skills and with a very limited future. 
We would like to feel that there are better ways to meet 
the needs of these students than the pattern found in most 
high schools today. However, at this time we can only re- 
port that this school is concerned and is constantly search 
ing for better solutions to these highly individualized 
problems . " 

It is significant to note, especially for the more 
recent residents in our communities of Lincoln and Sudbury 
that from our first year (1957) class we placed in college 
only 31% of our graduates and an additional 22% in other 
post-secondary institutions. Seven years later, June, 
1963, we placed in college approximately 60% of our gradu- 
ates and an additional 18% (approximately) in other post- 
secondary institutions. Of this record we are proud and 
justly sol And due credit must be given to the pre-high 

school training of our youth in both Lincoln and Sudbury 
for this most excellent of records; the high school could 
not have claimed this kind of success if the elementary 
and Junior High schools had not made a major effort to up- 
grade their educational programs. 

Looking ahead we see the need for the new addition to 
the building which should include a revision of the admin- 
istrative and guidance areas, additional classroom space, 
additional space for specialized areas, completion of the 
general facilities for the physical education program as 
well as for existing varsity sports programs. We believe 
that the need for a * hal f -school * auditorium is imperative, 

173 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



There are whole areas of student life that are missing be 
.use of the lack of auditorium space. 

Our school was founded on the basis of a strong and 
active guidance department, and our program and schedule 
have continued to reflect this policy. Under the compe- 
tent and able direction of Mr, Paul Vernon, our Director 
of Guidance, our school has gained and retained a reputa- 
tion among college admissions offices second to none in 
our ar ea . 

The following tables are only a limited phase of the 
material and information available at the office of the 
Director of Guidance: 



174 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



PLACEMENT OF 
THE LAST FIVE GRADUATING CLASSES 





Cl 


ass of 
1959 


Cl 


ass of 

1960 


Cl 


ass of 
1961 


Cl 


ass of 
1962 


Cl 


ass of 
1963 


Four-year 






















colleges 


30 


4 4.8% 


45 


4 7.8% 


63 


5 3.4% 


73 


5 7.5% 


90 


60.81% 


Two-year 






















col leges 


13 


19.4% 


8 


8.5% 


10 


8.5% 


16 


12.5% 


13 


8.7 8% 


Nur s ing 





0.0% 


4 


4.3% 


7 


5.9% 


4 


3.1% 


3 


2.0 3% 


Other Post- 






















Secondary 






















Schools 


3 


4.4% 


18 


19.1% 


12 


10.1% 


7 


5.5% 


10 


6.7 6% 


Post- 






















graduate wk . 





0.0% 


2 


2.1% 


1 


.8 5% 


1 


.75% 


4 


2.70% 


Mar r ied 


2 


3.0% 





0.0% 


1 


.8 5% 


2 


1.50% 





0.0% 


Working 


13 


19.4% 


13 


13.9% 


19 


16.2% 


17 


13.10% 


25 


16.89% 



Military 6 



9.0% 



4,3% 



4.2% 



6.05% 3 2.0 3% 



67 100.0% 94 100.0% 118 100.0% 128 100.0% 148 100.0% 



PLACEMENT OF THE CLASS OF 19 6 3 



Admitted to Degree-Granting Institutions 
(90 students placed in 61 colleges) 



Northeastern University 
Harvard University 
Nasson College 
Boston University 
Framingham State College 
University of Massachusetts 
St. Michaels College 
University of Michigan 
Pembroke College 
Brown University 
Lawrence University 
Lake Forest College 
Skidmore College 
Parsons College 
Middlebury College 
Massachusetts College of Art 
College of Notre Dame 
Clarkson College 
Salem State College 
Antioch College 
Norwich University 
Beaver College 






9 Mount Holyoke College 

4 University of Chicago 

4 Drew University 

4 Hiram College 

3 Catawba College 

2 Alfred University 

2 Nebraska State College 

2 Ohio Wesleyan University 

2 New England Conservatory 

2 o f Mu s i c 

2 University of Iowa 

2 Grove City College 

2 Michigan College of 

2 Mining &, Technology 

2 Syracuse University 

1 Coe College 

1 Beloit College 

1 University of Idaho 

1 University of Denver 

1 Barnard College 

1 Lake Erie College 

1 St. Lawrence University 



175 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



North Adams State College 
University of California 

( Berkeley ) 
Yale University 
Rice Inst itute 
Yanderbilt University 
Rensselaer Polytechnic 

Inst itute 
Rochester Institute of 

Technol ogy 
University of Florida 
Wesleyan University 



Simmons College 1 

Tufts University 1 

Goddard College 1 

Worcester State College 1 

Bates College 1 

Babson Institute 1 
Rhode Island School of 

Design 1 

Western College for Women 1 

Lycoming College 1 

Earlham College 1 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF 
COLLEGE PLACEMENT 



Class of 
1960 



Class of 
1961 



Class of 
1962 



Class of 
1963 



Colleges in 
Ma ssachusetts 



31 - 69% 29 - 46.1% 34 - 46.54% 30 - 33.3% 



Colleges in New 
England outside 
of Massachusetts 1 - 2% 



12 - 19.0% 11 - 15.1' 



18 - 20. 



Colleges outside 
of New England 



13 - 2! 



22 - 34.9% 28 - 38. 3i 



42 - 46.7% 



ADMITTED TO JUNIOR COLLEGES 



Wentworth Institute 2 

Fisher Junior College 2 

Cazenovia Junior College 1 

Chamberlayne Junior College 1 

Franklin Institute 1 

Paul Smith's College 1 



Westbrook Junior College 1 
Stockbridge School, Univ. 

of Massachusetts 1 

Cambridge Junior College 1 

Mount Aloysius Jr. College 1 

Cornell Agricultural School 1 



Framingham Union Hospital 
Pennsylvania Hospital 



ADMITTED TO NURSING SCHOOLS 

1 Mount Auburn Hospital 



ADMITTED TO OTHER POST -SECONDARY SCHOOLS 



Wilfred Academy 
Chand ler 

Bryant &. Stratton 
Burdett College 



3 New England School of Art 1 

1 I. B. M. School 1 

1 Robie School 1 

1 Arlington Technical School 1 



176 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 
QUALIFYING TEST 

During their Junior year, ninety-six members of the Class of 
1964 took the National Merit Test. Five of our students scored 
high enough to qualify as semi-finalists. These five will com- 
pete for the honor of a coveted Merit Scholarship. Sixteen 
other students were runners-up and each will receive the next 
award, a Letter of Commendation. 

Although no conclusions can be drawn from the following 
statistics, it is interesting to note the excellent quality of 
student performance in successive years: 















No 


. o 


f 




T 


ot al 


% 


of total 




No. of 


No 


. o 


f 


w 


inner s 


o 


f 




of 




cl as s re- 


Class 


stu- 


semi 


- 


1 


ett 


er s 


o 


f 


award 




ceiving 


of 


dents 
64 


f inali 



s t s 


commenda 

1 


ti 


on 


wi 


nner s 

1 




awar d s 


1959 




1 .6% 


1960 


94 




2 








4 








6 




6.2% 


1961 


118 




1 








6 








7 




6.0% 


1962 


132 




4 








9 








13 




9 .8% 


1963 


152 




5 








19 








24 




15.1% 


1964 


186 




5 








16 








21 




11.3% 



As reported by Dr. Tourville, "we can report another success 
ful year for the Regional High School. We have tried to balance 
the dual responsibilities of a quality education with sound fis- 
cal planning and operation. In the process we have tried to re- 
tain our goal of being a guidance-centered school by keeping para' 
mount the importance of the individual student." 

It has been a pleasure and a professional opportunity to 
direct your program for our secondary school youth this past year 



C. Newton Heath 
Superintendent of Schools 



177 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 19 6 3 



Bruce Warren Ad 1 e r 
Donn Peter Antonia 
Mary Ann Arciero 
Richard D. Arenstrup 
James V. Arnold, Jr. 
Barbara Lynn Avery 

ol Louise Barr 
Evelyn II, Be a z 1 e y 
Patricia Ann Bell 
Richard Henry Bergman 
John Sanbourne Bockoven, Jr. 
Karl Stanley Borg 
Allen Milton Bowles 
Amy Suzanne Brown 
Priscilla Faye Burns 
Victoria Nan Cameron 
Philip Stephen Cares 
Kathleen Ann Carroll 
Arthur Michael Carver 
David Erskine Chadsey 
Barbara Jane Chausse 
Elizabeth Clark 
Harvey Dayton Cobb 
Susan S. Coleman 
Barry Dixon Copp 
Brian Evans Copp 
Dianne Carol Cotoni 
William Edward Coughlin 
Mary Cynthia Coutu 
George Alexander Cox, Jr. 
James Magi 11 Cryer, III 
Charles Newell Cutler 
Nancy Kingsbury Davis 
Jan William Debye 
Frank Bartholomew Dentino, Jr 
Robert G. Devlin 
Valerie Jean DeWallace 
Lo is Dickey 
Ann Wright Dinwiddie 
Gordon Alcock Donaldson, Jr. 
Elizabeth Mary Douglas 
Susan Dyson 
Frederick J. Eisner 
Carlyn Jean Ellms 
Scott Wilson Emmons 
Ann Christine Filbin 
Thomaa Patrick Finnerty 
Regina Marie Foley 
Barbara Lynn Fultz 
Sheila Curry Garrity 
Ellyn F. Graham 
Marsden Pierce Griswold 
Richard Ellis Hand 
Joan Marie Hartmann 
Donald Earle Hawes 
Peter P. Herman 



Peggy Hoagland 
Gary L. Homan 
Ronald Clark Horton 
John E. Hosey 
Carol Hull 
Karla Humphreys 
Steven Wayne Jacobs 
Carolyn Jagger 
Elizabeth Ann Jenkins 
Robert Henry Jennette 
Thomas Hills Jewett 
Bruce Bayley Johnson 
Elaine Helen Kelley 
Lynda Jean King 
Judith Anne Klee 
Vernon Jerome Kramer, Jr 
Maria Constance Kyriakos 
Susan Lawrence 
Cheryl Ann Loesel 
Geoffrey Russell Loftus 
Malte Lukas 
Gerard G. Lupien 
Robert Douglas MacLean 
Sandra Marie MacLeod 
Sheila Margaret Mahan 
Maureen Patricia Malloy 
Betty Lorna Mann 
Bradley Warren Mattsen 
Walter McClennen 
Warren Edmund Meade 
Donald McKnight Messa 
Emery M. Miller 
Leslie Miller 
Melody Lynn Moir 
Joyce Darlene Monaghan 
Ann Morette 
Robert E. F. Morris 
Robert Joseph Napoli 
Paul E. Nix 
Catherine Norton 
Ernest H. Osgood, III 
Patricia Palson 
Rita Angelina Panetta 
Karen Ann Pardoe 
Neil G. Patterson 
Marjorie Carol Place 
Peter Adam Podgurski 
David Goodwin Prentiss 
Ellen Jane Raeke 
Judith Ann Rego 
Barbara J. Reynolds 
Anthony Rhodes 
Paul Rhodes 
Bonita Marion Robbins 
Sarah Ann Rogers 
Gary Richard Rutherford 



178 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Thomas A. Ryan 
Richard Paul Schar f enberger 
Richard Albert Schmalz, Jr. 
Nancy Louise Slocum 
Carl Daggett Smith 
Elizabeth Joan Smith 
Marshall J. Spaan, Jr. 
Robert B. Spence 
Marsha Ann Sperry 
Raymond J. Spinelli, Jr. 
Donald Gerald Stark, Jr. 
Harold Milton Streeter 
Roger C. Stretton 
Kathryn A. Stuntz 
Robert John Swinconeck 
Alain J. Tebo 
Paul Reid Temple 



George Brooks Thompson, III 

Denice Jean Thurman 

Mary Katherine Tooker 

Judith Rachel Travers 

David Ernest Tucker 

Carol Ann Tullie 

Mary Faith Venier 

Deborah Walker 

Dale Ellen Wasson 

Philip McLauthlin Way, Jr. 

Theresa Ellen White 

Josephine Mary Willerain 

Thomas Edwin Williams 

Kathryn Margaret Wilson 

Ruth Irene Wolfe 

Diana. Elizabeth Woodington 

Lynne Woodward 



179 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
Regional District Operating Expenses 

1963 



Funds Available 

Appropriation, salaries & expense 

Expend i tur es 

General Control 
Sal ar ie s 
Other expense 

Expense of Instruction 
Teachers' salaries 
Expense of school office 
Textbooks 
Suppl ies 

Expense of Operating School Plants 
Custodians' salaries 
Fuel 
Miscellaneous of operation 

Maintenance and Repairs 

Auxiliary Agencies 
Transpor tat ion 
Libr ar y 
Health 

Physical education 
Mi scellaneous 
Caf e t er ia 

Other expense 

Out of state travel 

Evening use of school building 



$ 22,500.72 
1 ,255.89 



428, 757.22 
15 , 398.80 
11 ,052.52 
13, 707.47 



30,487.29 

7,242.15 

21,817.96 

19 , 620.56 



68 , 751.73 
5,267.64 
3, 711.46 
6,921 .20 

10,683.63 
3,500 .00 



1 , 722.61 
606.25 



1964 
Budget 



$ 694,997.00 $ 756. 220.00 



Vocational tuition and transportation 2 . 733 . 60 
Total Expenditures $ 675 . 738 . 70 

Appor t ionment s 

$694,997.00 
99 ,140.92 

Balance to be apportioned $595,856.08 

Lincoln Apportionment 160,341.44 

Sudbury Apportionment 435,514.64 



Total Budget 

Less: Available Funds in 

District Treasury 



$ 24,567.00 
1 , 370.00 



477,175.00 
19 ,499.00 
14,558.00 
16,202.00 



32,115.00 

7,743.00 

23,400.00 

21 , 367.00 



68, 888.00 
7,578.00 
4,498.00 
9 ,606.00 

19 ,071.00 
3,588.00 



2,000.00 

700.00 

2.295.00 

$ 756 . 220.00 



$756 , 220.00 
100 .472.97 

$655,747.03 
167, 358.84 
488, 388.19 



180 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND STAFF 
January 1 , 19 64 



School Committee 



Ellen DeN. Cannon, Chairman 
Howard W. Emmons, V i c e -C ha i rman 
Joseph E. Brown 
James M. Jagger 
Virginia K. Kirshner 
Henry M. Morgan 



C. Newton Heath 



Superintendent of Schools 

Office: 420 Lincoln Road 
Sudbur y 



Term expires 1966 

Term expires 19 64 

Term expires 19 65 

Term expires 1965 

Term expires 1966 

Term expires 1964 



443-2662 
259-9527 



Business Manager and Secretary to School Committee 
Lily T. Spooner 443-2662 

District Treasurer 



George B. Flint 



Leslie M. Tourville 
Roger T. Thurston 
Paul J. Vernon 
Betty J. Adrian 
Bramwell B. Arnold 
Lewis K. Baldwin 
Katherine D. Barton 
Mary A. Beevers 
John B. Bowdoin 
Barbara Broadbent 
Derek F. Brown 
Eleanor M. Bu rgess 
Ruth M. Buxton 
Miriam S. Coombs 
John A. Doon, Jr. 
Dorothy A. Drake 
Vicki A. Edelman 
Marion F. Edwards 
Marjorie M. Flanagan 
Richard P. Flanagan 
Frank P. Gifune, Jr. 
Sherry M. Glass 
Mark G. Gulesian 
Frank Hey s , Jr . 



259-8611 



Teaching Personnel 

Ap pointed 

1956 
1956 
1958 
1961 
1956 
1961 
1956 
1962 
1958 
1962 
1963 
1963 
1956 
1956 
1959 
1961 
1963 
1956 
1962 
1960 
1962 
1962 
1961 
1957 



Pr inc ipal 

Assistant Principal 

Director of Gu i d a n c e 

English - Counselor 

Sc i ence 

Physical Education 

Homemaking - Counselor 

Engl i sh 

Hi story 

Engl ish 

Counsel or 

Mathemat ic s 

Lat in 

Engl ish 

Hi s t or y 

French 

Physical Education 

Biology 

Mathemat ic s 

History 

Ma thematics 

Hi story 

Engl ish 

Engl ish 



181 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



Richard W. Jeter 
Florence E. Johnson 
Richard J. Johnson 
Juanita G. Jones 
Frances M. Kellaher 
Joseph D. Krol 
Edward E. Leary 
Ph i 1 ip G. Lewis 
John A. Maccini 
John S. MacKenzie 
Alexander G. Marshall, 
Raymond S. Martin 
Marisa G. McCoy 
Robert E. Millett 
Terry F. Miskell 
Paul B. Mitchell 
Deborah T. Noyes 
Martha R. Pappas 
Carl G. Perkins 
Laura S. Pollock 
Ma ry L. Roberts 
George F. Ronan 
Bradford H. Sargent 
Frederic A. Scott 
Evelyn C. Shakir 
Katherine R. Simpson 
David J. Spang 
Sherman P. Spaulding 
Norman R. Swicker 
Stella Tsolas 
Irene R. Tutuny 
Paul J. Walsh 
Robert G. Wentworth 
Susan Wheatley 
Henry G. Zabierek 



Appointed 

1963 Speech and Drama 

1963 French 

1958 Business Subjects 

1962 Spanish 

1960 Business Subjects 

1961 German 

1960 Art 

1962 Mathematics 
1958 Earth Science - Counselor 

1961 Physical Education 
Jr. 1956 Mathematics 

1960 Chemistry 

1963 English 

1960 Biology 
1958 Mathematics - Counselor 
1957 History 

1962 French 

1961 English 

1960 Reading 

1957 Counselor 
1956 Physical Education 

1962 Driver Education 
1962 History 

1961 Chemistry, Physics 

1962 English 

1961 Biology 

1962 Earth Science 

1963 Mathematics 
1961 Industrial Arts 
1963 Art and Mechanical Drawing 
1956 Business Subjects - Counselor 

1958 Industrial Arts 
1960 Music 
1963 Librarian 
1958 History 



Health Personnel 



Gordon D. Winchell, M.D., School Physician 
Virginia Whitney, R. N. , School Nurse 



259-8618 
443-2545 



School Secretaries 



Regional High School 
Hope Baldwin 
Ellen D. Borg 
Harriet P. Canty 
Garcia Kimball 



443-2616 



Superintendent's Office 
Gertrude B. Holmes 
Frances C . Saul 
Dorothy M. Shea 



182 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY AND RECREATION 



Custodians and Maintenance 

William L. Long, Supervisor of Maintenance 

Donald Burgess 

James M. Horan, Jr. 

Ellsworth Oulton 

Oliver Wainio 

George Fales 

William F. McNeill 

Frances B. Long, Matron 

Eleanor E. Macdonald, Matron 

Cafeteria Personnel 

Isabel L. Taylor, Manager 

Anna E . Boyd 

Mildred A. Fales 

Mar y C . Gr over 

Dorothy M. Taffe 

John E. Valentino 

Rose C. Wright 

Bus Contractors 

Doherty 's Garage, Inc. 
Lincoln Au to Service, Inc. 
Wellesley Motor Coach Company 



NO -SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In the event of exceptionally severe weather conditions or 
when the transportation system is disrupted, WBZ , WCOP , WEE I , 
WHDH, WKOX, WNAC, and WSRO will broadcast the no-school announce- 
ment between 7:00 and 8:00 A. M. 

Since weather reports are not always reliable, and since 
the School District desires to render maximum educational service 
the schools will remain open except in very severe weather. 



183 



REGIONAL SCHOOL 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 



1964-1965 



Staff Workshop 

Labor Day 

Freshmen orientation day 

School opens 

Veterans* Day 

Thanksgiving recess 

(one half day on November 25) 

Christmas vacation 

(one half day on December 22) 

Winter recess 

Spr ing recess 

School closes 

Staff post-school workshop 



September 1-2-3-4, 1964 
September 7 
September 8 
September 9 
November 11 

November 26-27 

December 23-31 inclusive 

February 22-23-24-25-26 

April 19-20 

June 22 

June 23-30 inclusive 



184 



Grad 
9 


e 


10 




11 




12 




PG 





SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
MEMBERSHIP BY AGE AND GRADE 
October 1, 1963 

BOYS 

Age 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ Totals 

16 84 10 1 1 112 

25 75 13 1 1 115 

29 70 11 2 1 113 

20 57 18 2 97 

1 1 

Total 16 109 114 104 69 22 2 11 438 

GIRLS 

Age 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ Totals 

34 83 5 1 123 

22 94 5 121 

31 88 4 1 114 

28 65 4 97 

1 1 

Total 34 105 120 121 69 6 1 456 

Grand Total 894 

TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING OTHER SCHOOLS 
October 1, 1963 

Framingham Vocational High School 1 

Waltham Vocational High School 2 

Total Other Schools 3 
******* 

Distribution of Students Between Lincoln and Sudbury 

Lincoln Sudbury Tuition Total 

Regional High 247 645 2 894 

Vocational - 3 - 3 

Total 247 648 2 897 



Grad 
9 


e 


10 




11 




12 




PG 





185 



VITAL STATISTICS 



59 Births, 42 Marriages and 26 Deaths have been recorded 
during the year 1963, as follows: 



Date of 
Birth 



BIRTHS 



Name of Child 



Name s of Parents 



1961 
Sept. 26 Pamela Caroline Militzer Christopher B. & Judith A. 

Mil itzer 



1962 
Nov. 27 Susan Russell Mead 
Dec. 28 Sonja Christina 

Pastor iza 



Varnum R. & Janice H. Mead 
James & Ruth B. Pastoriza 



1963 

Jan. 4 Bonnie Lee Russes 

Jan. 9 Dean Kierstead Bennett 

Jan. 9 Duncan Gerald McKay 

Street 

Jan. 11 Suzanne Clarke Martin 

Jan. 12 Jonathan Lee Kramer 

Jan. 22 Charles Edward Stankard , 

III 

Feb. 1 Lynn Mary Zuelke 

March 3 Andrew Nishan Comjean 

March 11 Mark Michael Patterson 

March 14 Dorothy Ann Browning 

March 16 Debra Jean DeJesus 

March 21 Rebecca Parkhurst Sykes 

March 28 Rachel Ella Heart 

April 5 Sham Sundra 

April 12 Katherine Saltonstall 

Atchley 

April 15 Miriam Elizabeth Bowker 

April 21 Louise Westlake Lummus 

May 10 Andrew Joseph Langton 

May 11 Jocelyn G. Elliott 

May 19 Hershel Paul Reichlin 

May 19 James David Nelms , II 

May 2 7 Laura Anne Rice 

June 5 David Thaxter Gollob 

June 8 Jennifer Susan Wollmar 

June 12 David Blake McKnight, Jr 

June 12 Leona Elizabeth Champeny 

June 26 James Winthrop Fernald 

June 29 Janet Manning Taylor 

July 10 Carlin Mygritvan Rycken 

Finke 

July 14 Alyssa Marie Connors 

July 26 Lauren Blanche Hawes 

July 26 Sarah Jenks Boocock 

July 31 Wendy Elizabeth Hughes 

Aug. 16 Emily Sara Lavine 



Richard P. & Mary D. Russes 
Richard K. & Doris B. Bennett 

Earle B. & Janet H. Street 
Spencer F. & Caroline Martin 
Manuel & Ruth C. L. Kramer 
Charles E. &, Jean R. 

Stankard 
Lawrence W. & Nancy J. Zuelke 
Marc G. & Judith K. Comjean 
Robert F. & Mary A. Patterson 
George U. , Jr. & Marjorie 

E. M. Browning 
John &, Geneva A. C. DeJesus 
David F. & Margaret P. Sykes 
Frank E. & Jane S. Heart 
Vinod & Nancy D. E. Sundra 

Dana W. & Barbara P. Atchley 
David E. & Lily F. R. Bowker 
John W. & Ann A. P. Lummus 
William G. & Jane G. Langton 
William G. & Peggy J. Elliott 
Morris & Marianne W. Reichlin 
James A. & Phyllis H. Nelms 
James E e> Jr. & Barbara Rice 
Thomas F. & Barbara L. Gollob 
Dick J. &. Mary L.K. Wollmar 
David B. & Eleanor McKnight 
John C. & Leona Champeny 
George H. & Eleanor T. Fernald 
Walter R. & Dorothy P. Taylor 
Harry E. J. & Jo-Ann L. 

Finke 
Thomas H. &, Alice P. Connors 
Donald 0. & Lillian B. Hawes 
Roger B. &, Helen G. Boocock 
Robert J. &, Vera E.P. Hughes 
Jerome M. & Mary C. Lavine 



186 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Aug. 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sep t 
Sep t 
Sept 
Sept 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Oct. 



8 

4 

4 

15 

18 

18 

24 

25 

3 

6 



Oct. 


14 


Oct. 


21 


Oct. 


24 


Nov . 


2 


Nov . 


8 


Nov . 


9 


Nov . 


12 


Nov . 


17 


Nov . 


18 


Nov . 


30 


Dec. 


26 



Darlene Ruth Parsons 
Craig Martin Silva 
Penelope Gay Beal 
Margo Van Ummerson 
Gordon Davidson Row 
Charles Douglass Riddle 
Margaret Halliday Neily 
Donna Elizabeth Snelling 
Marcia Sue Haagensen 
Victoria Brooke 

DeNormand ie 
Katherine Kane 

DeNormand ie 
Ronald Bradley Wood 
Richard Earl Gregg 
Elizabeth Sturgis 

Williams 
Brenda Sue Chambers 
Ian Louis Polumbaum 
Timothy Warren Van Leer 
Willard Peele Hunnewell 
Henry William Thatcher, 

Jr. 
Kevin Ma honey 
Tracey Keay 
Charlotte Noelle 

des Cogne ts 



Dana L. & Unona E. Parsons 
Robert J. &. Nancy J. Silva 
Thomas P., Jr. &. Barbara Beal 
Luther &. Frances Van Ummerson 
Ronald V. &. Jane E. Row 
James D. &. Marilyn B. Riddle 
Alexander It Diana B. Neily 
Norman J. &, Carolyn R. Snelling 
Duane B. & Frances J. Haagensen 

James & Martha P. DeNormandie 

James &. Martha P. DeNormandie 
Robert M. & June W. Wood 
Richard P. & Diana H. Gregg 
Theodore H. &, Carolyn S. B. 

W i 1 1 i am s 
Gaylon &. Kathleen M. Chambers 
Theodore & Nyna B. Polumbaum 
Robert K. & Rachel D. Van Leer 
Willard P. & Dorothy Hunnewell 

Henry W. & Sandra A. Thatcher 
Gerald J. & Jeanne M. Mahoney 
Donald P. &, Mary Ann Keay 
Archer B. & Gwendolyn A. G. 
des Cogne ts 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Mar r iage 



Names 



Res idence 



1962 



Aug. 



25 



David M. Donaldson 
Lynn Burrows 



Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Saginaw, Michigan 



1963 



Jan . 
Jan . 
Feb. 
Feb. 



12 



13 



D'Arcy Graham MacMahon 
Lucia Todd 

Charles W. Long 
Diana Joy Nickerson 

Alfred Swanson 
Evelyn L. Aiken 

Morris Raker 
Anne Matheson (Preston) 
McCollom 



Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Dover , Mas s . 
Dedham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Sudbury , Mas s . 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 



187 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Da to of 
Mar r i ago 



Name s 



Res idence 



b. 16 Thomas Stoughton Bell 
Diana Peabody 

Feb. 23 Philip Birtwell Temple 
Diane Louise Powers 

March 1 Porfirio Perez 
Marion J. Brown 

March 1 Michael M. Rollins 
Johanne M. Longo 

March 30 W. Bruce Smith, Jr. 
Mary S. Deveau 

April 7 William Howard Wildes 

Shirley Louise Gedenberg 

April 20 Arthur Charles Godin 
Sally Crosby Me a d e 

April 20 Robert J. Konowicz 
Daphne R. Kent 

April 27 Manuel Villa Calamari 
Joan Ellen Rogers 

April 28 Anthony B. Sabato 
Rose F . Umbrello 

June 8 John D. Millard 
Jane Lee Pease 

June 15 John David Beam 
Marsha Tashjian 

June 15 Philip E. Hayden 
Sally Mor r is 

June 21 George R. Loebus 
Helen L. Dobson 

June 22 Philip Burr Bradley 
Maryjane Githens 

June 29 George Lynde Henshaw 
Pauline E. Todd 

June 29 William Gordon Saltonstall, 

Jr. 
Katrina Allen Jenney 

Aug. 3 Douglas Van Dyck Brown 
Jean Robbins Perry 



Weston, Ma s s . 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Leominster, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Natick, Mass. 

Lincoln , Ma s s . 
Chelsea, Mass. 

Ma son, N . H . 
Greenville, N. H. 

Lawrence, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Maynard, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Pauger , New Orleans, La. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Waltham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Arlington, Mass. 

Cross Findlay, Ohio 
Wayland, Mass. 

Boston , Mass . 
Boston, Mass. 

Statesville, N. S. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Rockingham, Vermont 

Mattapoiset, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 



Exeter, N. H. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Rockport, Mass 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 



188 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Date of 
Mar r iage 



Names 



Res idence 



Aug. 21 Glen Brian Miller 

Gail Evelyn Brisson 

Aug. 24 Roger Dale Semerad 
Ann Donaldson 

Aug. 31 Roger W. Walsh, Jr. 
Melanie C. O'Reilly 

Sept. 5 Dudley Milne Harde 

Ellen Lamphier Smith 

Sept. 5 Laverne David Cantine, Jr 
Karen Anderson 

Sept. 7 Stephen Edward Moore 
Julie Ellen Forbes 

Sept. 13 Alfred J. Greenwood 
Mary Lee Potter 

Sept. 28 Alan M. Stevens 

Gratia Lowell Snider 

Sept. 28 William E. Carroll 
Brenda Mary Hosey 

Oct. 12 Richard J. Hallett 
Mary P. Marshall 

Oct. 12 Richard Owens White 
Susan Belle Sherman 

Nov. 9 Robert A. 0»Leary 

Mary Elizabeth Peterson 

Nov. 9 Curtis Paul Suddarth 
Margaret Mary Gorman 

Nov. 23 Arthur R. Herrick, Jr. 
Maureen A, Harris 

Nov. 28 Rex Howard Jackson 
Nancy Jean Griffin 

Nov. 30 Walter M. Lowe 

Marcia A. Conroy 

Dec. 1 Charles Lee Todd 

Virginia Hamilton Dickey 

Dec. 28 Arthur Arlen Kee 

Judith Ann Sherman 



El Centro, California 
Lincoln , Ma s s . 

Albany, New York 
Lincoln , Ma s s . 

Great Falls, Montana 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Fairfield, Conn. 
Lincoln , Ma s s . 

Jackson, Michigan 
Lincoln , Ma s s . 

Lincoln , Ma s s . 
Sudbury, Ma s s . 

Lincoln , Ma s s . 
Bolton, Mass. 

New York, New York 
New York, New York 

Boston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Lincoln , Ma s s . 

Melrose, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Stratford, Conn. 

Elsberry, Mo. 
Wayland, Mass. 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Arlington, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Belmont, Mass. 

Maynard, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Winchester, Ma s s . 

Saratoga, California 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 



189 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Date of 

Mar r i age 

Dec. 28 



Names 



David A. Shaw 
Doris J. Grason 



Residence 



Malvern, Pennsylvania 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 



DEATHS 



Date of Death 

January 6 
January 28 
January 31 

February 1 
February 22 
February 28 



Mar ch 


13 


Ma r c h 


22 


June 


5 


June 


15 


June 


16 


June 


25 


July 


10 


Jul y 


16 


July 


21 


Jul y 


24 


July 


24 



September 4 
September 15 
September 30 



October 
October 
Oc t ober 



2 
10 
31 



November 7 
December 16 



Names 



Thomas Murphy 
Myrtle A. Snider 
George A. Sanderson 

Nellie L. Robie 
Lucie 0. Bagley 
Dora Christina Denio 

Thomas Newbold Codman 
Thomas John Williamson 

Henry D. Miller 
Bridget J. Murphy 
Serena (Johnson) Nordos 
John Greenlie 

Ruth (Wheeler) Gale 
Henry Coffin Everett, Jr. 
Robert Teasdale Lorrey 
Gordon H. Greenlaw 
Georgianna Howes Weston 

Hilma Lorrey 

James Cooper Livengood 

Ada Mathilda Gunneson 



Richard Charles Franciosi 26 
Matthew H. Doherty 88 

Alberta (Adophson) Fradd 73 



Catherine Andrews 
Charles Kimball Fitts 



57 
54 



Age 



Years 


Months 


Days 


89 




1 


78 


11 


24 


70 


- 


21 


82 


9 


22 


60 


3 


12 


57 


4 


8 


94 


9 


26 


67 


10 


18 


65 


— 


29 


62 


8 


14 


73 


7 


26 


85 


3 


25 


71 


6 


29 


72 


1 


10 


82 


9 


27 


32 


2 


13 


99 


10 


18 


83 


3 


28 


47 


5 


24 


87 


5 


29 



9 
3 



9 

18 
7 



190 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



250 



150 



Abbott, John A. L Diana B. $ 

Adams, James F, & Margaret M. 

Adams, John Quincy 

Adams, John Quincy &. Lucy D, 

Adams, Ramelle C. 

Adams, Thomas B. 

Adamson, William M. & Barbara M. 

Adkins, Archibald W. &. Dorothea 

Adler , Harold 

Adler, Ivy Ruth 

Adler, Walter, Jr. & Geraldine 

Algeo, John T # & Catherine R. 

Algeo, Leo J. &. Elaine T. 

Algeo, Margaret M. &, Neville, 

Agnes M. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 15,100 
Allison, William S. & Caroline 
Ammen, David L. & Judith B. 
Anderson, Carl L. &. Dorothy A. 
Anderson, Lawrence B. & Rosina 
Andrews, Francis S. & Dorothy W. 
Andrews, Paul R, & Catherine L. 
Angell, Craig W. & Carolyn G. 
Angelo, Gaspar & Eda Polcari 
Aptekar, Herbert H. & Florence 
Aptt, Harry S. &. Etta E. 
Armstrong, Russell J, 
Armstrong, Virginia 
Armstrong, William A., Jr. & 

Mary H. 
Ashworth, Harold T. & Irma D, 
Atchley, Dana W., Jr. &, 

Barbara S. P. 
Austin, Richard C. & Marcia W, 
Avery, Abigail D, 



Baggs, Arthur, Jr. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Baird-Atomic , Inc. 
Baker, John C. & El 
Baldwin, Herbert L, 
Baldwin, Robert H. 
Ballou, Clyde D. & 
Baldwin, William H. 
Balser, Martin & Ar 
Baltrush, William C 
Bannan, William J,, 
Charles L . , Jr . , 
Barbarow, Ruth 



& Marion S. 
& Rebecca B. 

izabeth E. 

& Beatrice 
& Susan E, 
Mildred A.S. 

& Agnes D. 
ienne S. 
. & Sarah M. 

Jr. & Quigg, 

Trustees 



50 



$ 8 



35 
16 

8 
10 
19 

6 
5 
3 



11 

11 

5 

13 

14 

2 

12 

17 

7 

4 

3 

9 

1 
7 

13 

7 
8 

7 

15 

2 
12 

7 
2 

7 
3 

2 
3 



050 
000 

250 

700 



250 
250 
300 
100 
250 
500 
450 

800 

550 
050 
850 
050 
600 
500 
000 
700 
700 
000 
950 
200 

600 
200 

100 
200 
600 

550 
200 
200 
800 
750 
000 
550 
400 
500 
550 
300 

550 
000 



$ 



901 

112 

28 

3,948 

1,870 

16 

924 

1,148 

2,161 

11 

700 

616 

386 



53 

1 ,69 
1 ,29 
1 ,23 

65 
1 ,46 
1 ,63 

28 
1 . 34 



98 



86 

44 

44 

1,03 



179 
806 

1,467 
806 
963 

845 

28 

1,702 

89 

308 

1,344 

845 

263 

56 

845 

369 

285 
336 



60 
00 
00 

00 
40 
80 
00 
00 
60 
20 
00 

40 

60 
20 
60 
60 
20 
60 
20 
00 
00 
40 
40 
00 
40 
40 

20 
40 

20 
40 
20 

60 
00 
40 
60 
00 
00 
60 
80 
00 
60 
60 

60 
00 



191 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Barber, John W., Jr. & Mary E. $ 

Barbera, Anthony A. & Eleanor E, 

Bardsley, Theodore J, & Doris A. 

Barker, William R. & Barbara S, 

Barnaby, John M. & Charlotte B. 

Barnard, Helen Ogden 

Barr, Edgar E. & Olive H. 

Barrett, Emerson P. & Margaret K. 

Barthel, Walter 

Barthel, Walter & Emma C. 

Bartlett, Nancy W. 

Bastress, E, Karl &, Anne W. 

Beal, Thomas P., Jr. & Barbara B. 

Beaton, Daniel R. & Shirley G. 

Belanger, Walter E. & Mary F. 

Bellizia, Francis E. & Mary H. 

Bennett, Richard K. & Doris S. 

Benton, Carl R, & Barbara A. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. 

Bernson, Bob & Edith J. 

Bertolami, Leo 

Billings, Bruce H, & Sarah W, 

Bingham, Elizabeth A. 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B. 

Bingham, George C. 

Bisbee, Marie E, 

Bishop, Fern W, 

Black, Everett A, & Anne E. 

Blais, George A, & Annette C. 

Blakeley, Gerald W., Jr. 

Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 

Bockoven, John S. 100 

Bockoven, John S. & Dorothy R, 

Boersner, Wolfram A. & Doris M. 

Bogner, Walter F. & Edith 

Boisvert, Henry A. & Blanche T, 

Bolt, Richard H, & Katherine L, 

Bolton, Stanwood K. & Thalia H, 

Bomengen, Allen & Ethel A, 

Bonaceto, Anthony & Grace 

Bonia, Walter J. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Robert H, 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 222,000 

Boston Edison Company 463,760 

Boston & Maine Railroad 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, Bertha V., Extrx. 

Boyce, Manley B. &, Alice M, 

Boyce, Mary M. 



$ 



4 
10 
3 
5 
6 
7 
7 
8 

5 
9 
14 
11 
7 
7 
6 
4 

16 

6 
7 
9 
1 
1 
5 
4 

29 
5 

36 



,800 
,000 
,060 
,200 
,400 
,850 
,000 
,500 
60 
,450 
,200 
,000 
,700 
,200 
,700 
,200 
,800 

100 
,400 

300 
,00 
,830 
,900 
,200 
,150 
,200 
,700 
,900 
,750 
,100 

300 



5 ,150 
1 ,650 
9 ,850 
4,800 

12,100 
8,200 
5 ,750 
6,050 
7,000 
600 

15, 300 

2,200 
550 
7,050 
4,550 
12,910 
6,550 



$ 537.60 
1,120,00 
342,72 
582,40 
716.80 
879 .20 
784.00 
952.00 
6.72 
610,40 
1 ,030,40 
1 ,568,00 
1,310,40 
806.40 
862.40 
694.40 
537.60 
11.20 
1,836.80 
33,60 
672,00 
876,96 
1,108,80 
134.40 
128.80 
582.40 
526,40 
3,348.80 
644,00 
4,043,20 
3 3,60 
11.20 
576.80 
184.80 
1 ,103.20 
537.60 
1,355,20 
918.40 
644.00 
677.60 
784,00 
67,20 
1,713.60 
24,864,00 
52,187,52 
61,60 
789,60 
509,60 
1,445.92 
7 3 3,60 



192 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Boyer , Edward 

Boyer , Edward L Angela V. 

Boyer, Louis L. L Elaine T. 

Bradford, Robert L. L Martha A. 

Bradley, Clifford L Jeanette E. 

Bradley, Junia T. 

Brannen, Robert C. L Barbara A. 

Braude, Stephen E. L Bettie J. 

Braun, Morton B. L Esther K. 

Breed, Laura Post, Marsh, 

Margaret B. L Paul E. 
Brennan, William L. L Eleanor A. 
Brewster, Ellen Beebe 
Briggs, Susan L, 

Bronson, Franklin C. L Catherine 
Brooks , Paul 

Brown, David R. L Sarah E. 
Brown, Deborah Trull, David 

Trull, Alan Trull 
Brown, Elizabeth G, 
Brown, Joan Nickerson 
Brown, John B. L Ann P. 
Brown, Robert W. L Lee G. 
Browne, Secor D. L Mary D. 
Brownell, Robert G. L Ruth M. 
Browning, Edgar C. L Katherine 
Browning, George U. 
Brown's Wood, Inc. 
Brunn, Robert R, &. 
Buerger, Maria 
Buerger, Martin J. 
Bulkley, Joel B. L Doris L. 
Burckett, Douglas M. 
Burckett, Douglas M. & Phillippa 
Burk, George W. t Ruth M. 
Burgess, William A. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burns, Melvin P. 
Burt, William F, L Donna G. 
Burton, William deK. L Priscilla 
Butcher, Alfred G. L Helen M, 
Butcher, Henry A, , Jr , & 

Ma rgaret V. 
Butler, Hector & Audrey Edith 
Butler, William B. & Mary Jane 
Butler, William H. & Nancy G. 
Butts, F, Marsena & Louise M. 
Butts, Louise M. 



Ma rgaret J, 
L Lila 



100 



50 



50 



5 
7 
6 
5 
3 
8 
2 
9 
9 

7 
6 

1 

7 

11 

7 

1 

15 

5 

4 

2 

7 

14 

3 

4 

1 

12 

10 
10 

8 
5 
1 

13 
4 
7 

10 
4 

2 
4 
6 
7 
13 



400 
750 
000 
700 
130 
800 
850 
800 
600 

760 
250 
50 
600 
000 
250 
200 

700 
450 
750 
000 
300 
500 
200 
750 
850 
150 
250 

600 
600 

250 
800 
500 
410 
100 
200 
750 
650 

200 
400 
350 
050 
750 
400 



604 
868 
672 
638 
350 
935 
319 
097 
075 

869 
700 
5 
179 
784 
271 
806 



19 

1 , 73 

64 

44 

25 

84 

1 ,59 

42 

54 

12 

1 , 37 

1 ,18 
1 ,18 

92 
64 
16 

1 ,50 
45 
80 

1,20 
52 



246 
492 
711 
789 
1 ,540 
44 



193 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax 


on 


Real 


and 


Personal 


Esta 


te 


5 660 


.80 


112 


.00 


1 ,248 


,80 


302 


.40 


996 


.80 


375 


,20 


190 


.40 


235 


,20 


3,477 


,60 


918 


.40 


700 


.00 


504 


,00 


1,097 


,60 


392 


.00 


582 


.40 


2,279 


,20 


845 


.60 


504 


,00 


560 


.00 


862 


.40 


739 


,20 


1,282 


.40 


386 


.40 


673 


,12 


588 


.00 


1,282 


.40 


397 


.60 


515 


,20 


588 


,00 


616 


,00 


582 


,40 


576, 


,80 


862, 


,40 


750, 


.40 


1,304, 


,80 


812, 


,00 


817, 


,60 


442, 


,40 


784, 


,00 


716, 


80 


526, 


40 


616, 


00 


1,512, 


00 


403. 


20 


336, 


00 


638. 


40 


772. 


80 



$ 



Calkins, Charles W. & Thelma 
Calkins, Charles W., Jr. 
Calkins, Charles W., Jr. & 

Martha A, 
Calkins, Raraona T, 
Callahan, Thomas R, 
Carapobasso, Anthony B, & 

Dorothy M. 
Campobasso, Ethel 
Campobasso, Joseph R. 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. &, Bradford 
Caras, Byron & Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair & Florence L, 
Carew, John M, &, Alice M, 
Carley, John A. & Joan Keir 
Carney, Florence T, 
Carney, James J. & Agnes M, 
Carstensen, Warren & Evelyn G, 
Caskey, Walter H, & Anna H, 
Cassidy, Henry J, &, Verna E. 
Cassidy, Robert E. &, Isabelle 
Cassis, Anthony 
Caswell, John R, & Carol B, 
Cate, Philip T. , Jr. & Marjorie 
Causer, William 0. &, Mary E. 
Chadwick, William & Jessie T, 
Champeny, John C. & Leona G. 
Chapin, Louise B. & Bertha L. 
Chapin, Margaret E. 
Chapman, James S. & Emily M. 

is. Herbert N, &, Eleanor M, 

J. 



$ 5,900 



1 ,000 



sme 



Chiotelis, Charles L, & la 
Chipraan, Robert H. &, Mary F, 
Chisholm, Edward C, &, Margaret F, 
Chittick, Mary G. &, Suesens, 

Eleanor G, 
Chu, Ge Yao L Wei Ying 
Church, Robert T. & Priscilla S. 
Ciampi, Emilio &. Mary P. 
Cibel, Stanley A. & Thelma W, 
Ciraso, Amelia 
Clare, Mary E. 

Clark, Clifford A. &. Patricia D, 
Clark, Richard C.B. & Josephine 
Clark, Vern L Velma M, 
Clark, William T. &, Catharine T. 
Coan, Thomas & Catherine M. 
Coane, John H, , Jr , 
Coburn, Edward S, 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. M, 



200 



11 


,150 


2 


,700 


8 


,900 


3 


, 350 


1 


,700 


2 


,100 


31 


,050 


8 


,200 


6 


,250 


4 


,500 


9 


,800 


3 


,500 


5 


,200 


20 


,350 


7 


,550 


4 


,500 


5 


,000 


7 


, 700 


6 


,600 


11 


,450 


3 


,450 


6 


,010 


5 


,250 


11 


,450 


3 


,550 


4 


,600 


5, 


,250 


5, 


500 


5, 


200 


5, 


150 


7, 


700 


6, 


700 


11, 


650 


7, 


250 


7, 


300 


3, 


950 


7, 


000 


6, 


400 


4, 


700 


5, 


500 


13, 


500 


3, 


600 


3, 


000 


5 , 


500 


6, 


900 



194 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Codma 
Ty 
Be 
Cof fe 
Cole , 
C om j e 
C oms t 
Corns t 
Conan 
Conar 
Cond i 
Conle 
Conli 
Conna 
Ja 
Conno 
Conno 
Conno 
Conr a 
Conr o 
Const 
Cook , 
Cook , 
Cook , 
Cook , 
Cook , 
Cook , 
Cooli 
Coons 
Cope , 
Cope , 
Corraa 
Corr i 
Corr i 
Cor r i 
Corr i 
Cos te 
Coste 
Cotoi 
Coton 
Cough 
Court 
Cous i 
Cous i 
Cous i 
Cowen 
Cowle 
Cr and 
Crawf 
Cr eon 



y» 
t, 
y , 

ir 



n f Dorothy S. F. M. , 
ler, Roger B. L Fawcett, 
njamin T # , Trustees 
y, John B. L Wilma L. 

Edwin M. L Lucy F. 
an, Marc G. L Judith K. 
ock , Joan B. 
oc k , Joan M. 
t. Lily R. 
Constance 

Robert P. ft Phyllis C. 
Barclay 

James J. L Winifred I. 
John J. &. Fer r o , 
cquel ine 

lly, Donald W. &, Joyce Y. 
lly, J. Irving &. Evelyn 
rs, Thomas H. L Alice P. 
d f Walter C. & Margaret M. 
y, John L. &. Grace W. 
antine, Philip J. 

Celia M. 

Harry 

Harry & Kathleen G. 

John F. & Ethel A. 

Paul & Jacqueline H. 

Paul W., Jr. & Marian M. 
dge, Henry P. & Alice C. 
, Richard D. & Nancy J. 

Oliver & Alice DeN. 

Thomas Pym & Elizabeth W. 
ck, Allan M. 
gan, Anna G. , Admx. 
gan, Leo W. 
gan, Mary 
gan, Mary K. 
llo, John D. 
llo, William H. & Ell 
a, Anthony J. & Lucy 



$ 



en E . 

M. A. 

y T. 



i , Car olana M. 

lin, Francis B # & Mar 

ney, Joseph Donald 

ns, Ashley B, 

ns, Bessie M. 

ns , Laurence B. & Jeanne B, 



50 



400 



Rodney P. & Eleinor 
, Addison & Alexandr 



all, Stephen H. & Pat: 



a C , 
r ic ia 

ord, John D. & Joanna W. 

te, Anthony J., Trustee 



44 


, 400 


4,972 


.80 


5 


, 200 


582 


,40 


11 


,500 


1 , 288 


,00 


9 


,550 


1 ,069 


,60 


7 


, 600 


851 


,20 


5 


, 250 


588 


,00 


11 


,000 


1 , 232 


,00 


4 


,400 


492 


.80 


5 


, 150 


576 


,80 






5 


,60 


4 


,550 


509 


,60 


4 


, 250 


476 


,00 


4 


, 650 


520 


,80 


2 


, 300 


257 


,60 


1 


,650 


184 


,80 




900 


100 


,80 


5 


,050 


565 


,60 


7 


,100 


795 


,20 


9 


,050 


1 ,013 


,60 






44 


,80 


7 


,800 


873 


,60 




900 


100, 


,80 


6 


, 250 


700 


,00 


9 


,100 


1 ,019 


,20 


8 


,150 


912, 


,80 


17 


,700 


1 ,982 


,40 


9 


,000 


1 ,008 


,00 


7 


,400 


828, 


,80 


1 


,000 


112 


,00 


4 


,000 


448 


,00 


3, 


, 300 


369 


,60 


7 


, 600 


851, 


,20 


1 


, 600 


179, 


,20 




300 


33, 


,60 


2 


,000 


224, 


,00 


6 


, 700 


750, 


,40 


4 


,700 


526, 


,40 


1, 


,700 


190, 


,40 


3, 


350 


375, 


,20 


2, 


350 


263, 


,20 


4, 


750 


532, 


,00 


8, 


050 


901, 


,60 


5 , 


050 


565, 


,60 


6, 


,050 


677, 


,60 


10, 


750 


1,204, 


00 


5 , 


950 


666, 


40 


1, 


500 


168, 


00 



195 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Crockett, Alan D. & Judith D. $ 
Crook, Constance S. 
Crowson, Leslie W. &, Madeline 
Culver, Perry J. & Kate S. 
Curaraings, William R. & Palma M, 
Cunningham, J. Lewis & Ruth P. 
Cunningham, Robert A. & Margaret 
Cunningham, Robert M, 

Dadraun, Harrie H. &. Helen 

Dahl, Thyra 

Dalrymple, Chester & Jean 

Dalrymple, Sidney C. & Dorothy 

Damico, Louise 

Daniels, Bruce G. & Janet B. 

Danosky, Edward A. 

Danosky, Edward A. & Mary C. 

Danosky, Stefania 

D*Arrigo Brothers Company of 

Massachusetts 
d'Autremont, Chester C. 
d'Autreraont, Chester C. & Ruth 
David Buttrick Company 
Davidson, Robert W. & Cynthia A. 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davis 
Davison 
Dawe s 

Day, Mildred 
Dean, Emma W. 
Dean, William M. 

Dean, William M. & Lorraine C. 
DeCilio, Frank W. & Josephine R, 
Dee, Helena A. 
DeFord, William &, Elinor S. 
De Jesus, John &. Geneva Ann 
DeMone, Harold W. & Elsie R. 
Denehy, Edward J. &. Bernadette 
Denese, Mary E. 
Denio, F. Winchester 
Denisevich, Helen 
DeNormandie, James 
DeNormandie, James, Executor 
DeNormandie, James &. Martha 



$ 



Alfred M. 

D. Bradford L Barbara G. 
John R. &, Jacqueline C. 
Prescott L. 

Ronald C, & Barbara C. 
Saville R. & Anita V. 
Sherman P. & Phyllis M. 
William H. 
, Alice P. 
Donald L. & Ruth K, 



1,000 



100 



1,000 



6 
3 
6 
18 
6 
4 
9 
6 

12 
5 

16 

12 
5 

13 
1 
5 
9 



000 
500 
750 
400 
800 
750 
200 
950 

500 
600 
350 
750 
950 
800 
750 
650 
900 

250 



20 


,450 


14 


F 800 


3 


,300 


4 


,750 


10 


,400 


5, 


,200 


11, 


,900 


6, 


,250 


9 i 


,250 


4, 


,200 


4, 


750 


14, 


700 


4, 


350 


1, 


750 


3, 


200 


1, 


750 


4, 


100 


6, 


500 


3, 


200 


6, 


750 


6, 


500 


14, 


650 


11, 


500 


8, 


600 


3, 


950 


9, 


050 


3, 


760 


20, 


400 


24, 


850 



$ 



672.00 
392.00 
756,00 

2,060.80 
761.60 
532,00 

1,030.40 
778.40 

1,400.00 
627,20 

1,831,20 

1,428.00 
666,40 

1 ,545,60 
196.00 
632.80 

1,220.80 

364,00 
11.20 

2,290.40 

1,657.60 
369,60 
644,00 

1,164,80 
582,40 

1,332.80 
700.00 

1,036.00 
470.40 
532.00 

1 ,646.40 
487,20 
196,00 
358,40 
196.00 
459,20 
728,00 
358,40 
756.00 
728.00 

1,640.80 

1,288,00 
963,20 
442,40 

1,013,60 
421,12 

2,284,80 

2,783.20 



196 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



DeNormandie, James L Robert L # 
DeNormandie, James, Cannon, 

Ellen DeN. L Cope, Alice DeN. 
Derderian, Edith H. 
desCognets, Archer B. L 

Gwendolyn G. 
Dewey, Davis R., II 
Dexter, Philip & Barbara C. 
Dickey, Dana H. & Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. L Julia G. 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. &. Teresa E. 
Diminico, Louis & Antonetta 
DiPerna, John F,, Nicola, 

Anthony J., Fannie, &. 

Ferrante, Charles J. 
Dixon, George M. L Anna R. 
Dixon, Russell J. & Theresa J. 
Dodge, Arthur C. & Dorothea S. 
Doherty's Garage, Inc. 
Doherty, Mary E., Margaret A., 

&. Marjorie 
Doherty, Matthew H. & Elizabeth 
Domen ichel la , Dominic 
Domenichella , Mattie M. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L. 
Donaldson, Estate of Charlotte 
Donaldson, Gordon A. & Elizabeth 
Donaldson, Robert D. 
Donaldson, Robert D. , Jr. 
Donaldson, Robert D. , Jr., 

Malcolm L. , Donald P. f 

Gordon A., Charlotte L. & 

Peck, Jean E. 
Dorian, Newart 

Donnell, Samuel H. & Marion L. 
Donovan, Leo A. & Elinor C. 
Dorrington, Richard W. & Phyllis 
Dougherty, Denis M, & Marion C. 
Dougherty, Mary Grace, Adm. 
Doughty, Joseph M. & Martha L. 
Dow, Sterling, III & Eleonore P. 
Downing, Grace L, 
Drake, Lillian W, & Garmory, 

Bertha V. 
Drew, Frederic T. & Shirley D. 
Dreyfus, Pierre M. &. Dorothy R, 
DuBois, Anson M. &, Olive S. 
DuBois, Eliot & Barbara 
Duffy, James E., Ill & Barbara 
Durnan, John P. & Leona E, 



$ 



50 



1 ,100 



600 



$ 24,500 

7,850 
3, 750 

13,850 

17,550 

17,250 

4 , 400 

6,000 

6,900 

12,500 



2,650 
500 
4, 800 
5 ,500 
7 , 600 



2,400 

9 , 200 

700 

10, 300 

8 ,500 

9 , 250 
8, 600 

59 , 600 
4,750 



$2,744.00 

879 .20 
420.00 

1 ,551.20 

1 ,971.20 

1 ,932.00 

492.80 

672.00 

772.80 

1 , 400.00 



296.80 
56.00 
537.60 
616.00 
974.40 

268.80 

1 ,030.40 

78.40 

1 ,220.80 

952.00 
1 ,036.00 

963.20 
6,675.20 

532.00 



7 


, 600 


851,20 


4 


, 200 


470.40 


5 


,950 


666,40 


2 


,500 


280,00 


1 


,050 


117,60 


3 


,800 


425,60 


7, 


, 300 


817,60 


5 , 


,050 


565,60 


5 , 


,700 


638,40 


5, 


,000 


560,00 


5 , 


,250 


588,00 


4, 


500 


504,00 


5, 


000 


560,00 


5 , 


000 


560.00 


6, 


050 


677.60 


9, 


800 


1,097.60 


6, 


400 


716.80 



197 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Judith R, 
Priscilia 



Dustin, Daniel E. & Rachel S. $ 
Dwyer, Warren R. & Marilyn H. 

East , Edla A. 

Eaton, Gertrude S. 

Eckhardt, Homer D. & Mary G, 

Edgell, Henry W. 

Edmonds, Dean S., Jr. & Louise 

Ehlert, Caroline E. 

Elliott, Robert H. L Ethel M. 

Elliott, William G. & Peggy P. 

Emerson, Claire G. 

Emerson Realty Trust - John E. 

Mo ore, Tr u s t e e 
Emmons, A. Bradlee & 
England , Albert E. & 
Eppling, Frederic J. & Sarah J. 
Ericson, Herbert E. & Erlyne R. 
Erickson, Leonard V. & Martha F, 
Ernst, Martin L . &, Lois 0. 
Evangelista, Florenzo T. & 

Dorothy L, 
Evans, Lucius W. & Virginia C. 

Faddoul, George P. & Natalie A. 
Faran, James J. & Ellen G. 
Farley, Louis C., Jr. & Isabel K. 
Farrell, Philip J. &, Ruth E. 
Faunce, Mary Gill & Anthony 
Fedock, Metro & Hazel A. 
Felegian, Peter & Marion C, 
Fell, Florence C. & Beverly 
Fenijn, Chris J. & Yvonne 
Fernald, George H. & Eleanor T. 
Field, Warwick F., Jr. & 

Rosamond R. 
Filbin, Robert & Eva M, 
Fillmore, Bruce R, & Eleanor L. 
Finesinger, Abraham L. 
Finesinger, Abraham L. & Natalie 
Finke, Harry E. J. L Jo-Anne L. 
Finnerty, James L. &, Anna C. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 
Fisher, John W. 
Fitch, Marion A. 

Fitts, Charles K. & Gertrude W. 
Fitzgerald, John H. & Thelma C. 
Flaherty, Augusta D. 
Flanagan, James & Wilhelmina G. 
Flanders, Charles C., Jr. & Lois 



$ 



5 

7 

8 

14 

19 

6 

5 

12 

5 

17 
9 

14 
6 
9 
5 

14 

3 
16 

7 
10 
9 
9 
12 
3 
6 
4 
2 
6 

4 
4 
4 
1 

20 
5 
5 
7 
7 

14 

16 
3 

10 



750 
200 

500 
600 
200 
900 
500 
075 
450 
350 
000 

750 
250 
000 
250 
500 
050 
550 

950 
650 

350 
860 
050 
200 
000 
450 
700 
800 
450 
200 

450 
500 
750 
800 
300 
900 
450 
250 
250 
200 
750 
300 
050 
850 
700 



$ 



756,00 
806.40 

616,00 

851,20 

918,40 

1,668,80 

2,184,00 

680,40 

610,40 

1,383,20 

560.00 

1,988.00 
1,036.00 
1 ,568,00 

700,00 
1 ,064,00 

565,60 
1,629.60 

442,40 
1,864,80 

823,20 

1 ,216,32 

1,013.60 

1,030,40 

1,344,00 

386,40 

750.40 

537,60 

274,40 

694,40 



498.40 
504,00 
532,00 
201,60 

2,273.60 
660,80 
610,40 
812,00 
812.00 

1,590.40 

1,876.00 
369,60 

1,125,60 

95,20 

862.40 



198 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Flannery, Donald J. & Harriet $ 
Flannery, Ralph L Constance H. 
Flansburgh, Earl R. &. Louise H. 
Fleck, Richard C. & Frances R. 
Fleming, Clifford D. L E. 

Frances 
Flewelling, Roy S. &. Thelma G. 
Flint, Edith F. 
Flint, Edward F. & Henry R. 
Flint, George B. L Lucie S. 
Flint, Josephine R. 
Flint, Warren F. 
Floyd, Olive B. 
Fl ynn , Helen C . 
Foley, Harold F. & Rita E. 
Foley, Harold W. 
Forbes, Nancy S. 

Forbes, Sherman H. &. Anabel 0. 
Fottler, Marshall A. & Angie K. 
Fougere, Guy L, & Pamela J. K, 
Foust, James L. & Dorothy B. 
Fradd, Norman W. & Alberta A. 
Fraser, Robert M. & Donna A. 
Freeman, David F. & Constance C. 
French, John B # & Deborah C. 
Fryatt, Thomas F. 
Fuller, Ernest L. & Doris 0. 
Fullerton, Albert L. , Jr , &. 

Mary S. 



S 



Gagne, Lawre 
Gajewski, Ce 
Gandolfo, Ma 
Garland , Jos 
Garrison, Da 
Garrison, Jo 
Gary, John E 
Gatchell , G. 

Esther A. 
Gent ile , Jos 
Geophysics C 

Amer ica 
Gerson, Nath 
Gilbert, Geo 
Gilbert , Joh 
Gilbert, Mar 
Giles , Thoma 
Gilfoy, Dona 
Giurleo, Jam 
Gleason, Nan 



nee E. &, Dorothy Q. 
slaus A. &, Sophie 
tthew F. &. Frances L 
eph & Mira C. 
vid L. & Alice E. 
hn B. & Barbara F. 
. &, Maida F. 
Gordon, Jr. &, 

eph F, & Kathleen E, 
orporation of 

aniel C. & Sareen R, 
rge H. &, Rebecca A. 
n W. & Josephine L. 

y J. 

s T, & Stella A. 
Id A. & Helen B. 
es M, & Mary C. 
cy W. J. 



2 
5 

10 

8 
8 
1 
8 
5 
5 
13 
4 
8 
4 
8 

9 
4 
1 
6 
7 
6 
6 
8 
5 
8 

11 

8 
5 
7 
2 
6 
8 
12 

5 
6 

28 

10 
4 
3 
3 
2 

12 
9 

11 



100 
500 
750 
700 

750 
300 
900 
000 
150 
500 
700 
650 
950 
800 
500 
950 
500 
150 
500 
260 
350 
900 
200 
850 
250 
800 

300 

600 
500 
200 
280 
600 
150 
700 

850 
000 

650 
200 
900 
000 
250 
050 
400 
300 
750 



S 



235 

616 

84 

1 ,198 



98 
92 
21 
89 
57 
61 

1 ,53 
52 

1 ,00 
53 
95 
10 

1 ,06 
46 
16 
70 
82 
77 
69 
99 
58 
98 



1,265 





963 


,20 




616 


,00 




806 


,40 




255 


,36 




739, 


,20 




912 


,80 


1 


,422, 


,40 




655, 


,20 




672, 


,00 


3 


,208, 


,80 


1 


,142, 


,40 




548, 


,80 




336, 


,00 




364, 


,00 




229, 


,60 


1 


,388, 


,80 


1 


,041, 


,60 


1 


,316, 


00 



20 
00 
00 
40 

00 
60 
80 
00 
80 
00 
40 
80 
40 
60 
00 
40 
00 
80 
00 
12 
20 
80 
40 
20 
00 
60 

60 



199 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Goddard, Richard B. & Alice L. 

Goodwin, Herbert F, & Elizabeth 

Gordon, Marie C. 

Gordon, Frank W. & Marie C. 

Gordon, Robert D. & Nancy M, 

Gounaris, Thomas X. & Jean G, 

Grabill, Elliott V. &, Martha L. 

Graf , Malcolm 

Grande, Orlando S. & Rose P. 

Gr as , Ranulf W. 

Gras, Ranulf W. & Annette E. 

Grason, Rufus L, & Edna B. 

Gray, Robert W. 

Greaves, Allan W. & Theresa D, 

Greene, Frederick H. , Jr. & 

Helen H. 
Gregg, Earl F. & Doris H. 
Griffin, Allen A. & Ruth W. 
Grim, William M. , Jr. & Barbara 
Grinnell, William L. & Virginia 
Gropius, Walter & Ilse 
Gross, T. A. 0. &, Judith C. F, 
Grover, C. Stuart & Gunilda G. 
Gunaris, Theodore & Rheta D, 
Gustafson, Craig S. & Louise M. 
Guy, Donald C. & M. Cynthia 

Haagensen, Duane B. & Frances J. 
Haartz, John C., Jr. & Beatrice 
Haden, Russell L, , Jr. & 

Constance J. 
Hagenian, Joseph C. & Irene R. 
Hagerty, Julia C. & Miele, 

Augusta 
Hagmann, Otto 
Hagmann, Otto & Katherine 
Hagopian, Richard G. &, Helen 
Hale, Donald G. & Frances 
Haley, Whitney W. L Barbara 
Hall, Cecil E. fc Nancy E, 
Hall, Henry P. & Barbara G. 
Hall, Thomas C. &, Mary M. 
Halsey, William A. i, Leila W. 
Hamilton, Harry A. & Bessie E. 
Hankey, Francis W. fc Edna J. 
Hanlon, Catherine L. 
Hanneman, Roger W. & Marion N. 
Hannon, William H. , Jr. &, Louise 
Hanson, Adler M. & Madeline A. 
Hapgood, Norman, Jr. & Ruth K. 



$ 



$ 



50 



3 

17 
4 

9 
5 

13 
2 

15 

7 
6 
8 
3 

10 
9 
9 
5 
9 

14 
6 
7 
5 
7 

11 

7 
11 

13 
4 

2 
3 
5 
6 
4 
8 
8 
7 

12 
6 
4 
7 
5 
6 
1 

10 
5 



100 
100 
300 
10 
050 
000 
000 
350 
500 

000 
610 
450 
800 

150 
900 
600 
900 
100 
350 
950 
550 

oop 

900 
710 

300 
000 

450 
300 

900 
900 
200 
700 
100 
700 
300 
750 
350 
700 
250 
900 
450 
200 
100 
00 
100 



$ 347.20 

1,915.20 

481,60 

1.12 

1,013.60 

560.00 

1,456,00 

263.20 

1,736.00 

5.60 

784.00 

740,32 

946,40 

425,60 

1,136.80 

1,108.80 

1,075,20 

660,80 

1,019.20 

1,607.20 

778.40 

845.60 

560,00 

884,80 

1,311.52 

817.60 
1 ,232.00 

1,506.40 
481.60 

324,80 
436,80 
582.40 
750.40 
459,20 
974,40 
929,60 
868,00 

1 ,383,20 
750.40 
476.00 
884.80 
610.40 
694,40 
123,20 

1 ,120,00 
571.20 



200 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 





Tax on 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 




estate 




778, 


,40 




582, 


, 40 




694, 


,40 




263, 


,20 




28, 


,00 




537, 


,60 


1 


,002, 


,40 


l 


,064 


,00 




330, 


,40 




156, 


,80 




268, 


,80 




168, 


,00 




386, 


,40 


l 


,545, 


,60 




168, 


,00 




761, 


,60 




806, 


,40 




767, 


,20 




644, 


,00 


l 


,713, 


,60 




677, 


,60 




828, 


,80 




616, 


,00 


3 


, 707, 


,20 


1 


,237, 


,60 




190, 


,40 




560, 


,00 




728 


,00 


1 


,489, 


,60 




621, 


,60 




817, 


,60 




632, 


,80 




5, 


,60 




582, 


,40 




554, 


,40 




638, 


,40 




392, 


,00 


1 


,080, 


,80 


1 


,523, 


,20 


1 


,472, 


,80 


1 


,125, 


,60 




621, 


,60 




812, 


,00 




935, 


,20 


1 


,086, 


,40 



Hardy, Harriet L # $ 

Harney, Gregory G. , Jr. &. 

Elizabeth E. 
Haroian, Henry &. Jessie S. 
Harrington, Clifford F., Jr. L 

Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harrington, Nancy 
Harrington, Winthrop W. L 

Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harris, John N. L Naomi A. 
Harris, Roger W. L Evelyn B. 
Harrison, George R. L Elizabeth C 
Hart , Joseph S . 
Hartraan, Henry F. 
Hartwell Farm 
Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood , Reed 

Hatsopoulos, George N. L Daphne 
Hawes, Donald 0. L Lillian B. 
Haworth, George G. L Thelma E. 
Hayes, John R. & Barbara W. 
Haytayan, Harry M. L Katherine J. 
H. B. Knowles, Inc. 

Healey, Harry R. , Jr. L Jeanne C. 
Healy, Edward M. L Helen T. 
Heart, Frank E. & Jane S, 
Heck, Mary Higbee 
Hedge, Mary A. 
Helburn, Peter L Margaret 
Held, Arnold E. L Mary A. 
Hellman, Maurice H. & Dolores T. 
Hemry, Leslie P. & Mary Jane 
Henderson, Ernest, Ernest, III, 

& Roberts, Margaret M. , Trs, 
Henderson, Gerard C. L Edith M, 
Henderson, Mary S. 
Henderson, Robert S # 
Henderson, Robert S. & Carolyn H. 
Henley, Merrill J. & Ida H. 
Hennessy, Frank J., Jr. L Pauline 
Herlihy, Maurice K. &, Jean E. 
Herlin, Melvin Arnold & Eugenia 
Herman, Edwards W. 
Herthel, Stephen W. & Evelyn S. 
Hester, Leon B. & Mary B. 
Hibben, George C. & Julia K, 
Hill, Jacques A. F. 
Hill, Walter L. &, Patricia C. 
Hoar, George W. , Dorothy S., 

Norman W., L Shirley E, 



$ 6 ,950 



1 ,500 



2,150 



50 



5 


200 


6, 


,200 


2 


,350 




250 


4 


800 


8 


950 


9 


500 


2 


950 


1 


,400 


2, 


400 


3 


450 


13 


800 


1, 


,500 


6 


, 800 


7 


,200 


6 


850 


5 


, 750 


13 


,150 


6, 


,050 


7 


,400 


5 


,500 


33, 


,100 


11 


,050 


1, 


, 700 


5, 


,000 


6 


,500 


13, 


,300 


5 


,550 


7, 


, 300 


5 , 


650 


5, 


,200 


4, 


950 


5, 


,700 


3, 


500 


9, 


650 


13, 


600 


13, 


150 


10, 


050 


5 , 


550 


7, 


250 


8, 


350 



9, 700 



201 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Holbrow, Frederick & Florence $ 
Holdsworth, Dennis William & 

Vega 
Holland, Taffy K. 
Hollingsworth, Lowell M, & 

Florence S. 
Home National Bank of Brockton, 

Trustee 
Hoover, Henry B, & Lucretia J. 
Hosey, John E. & Margaret L. 
Houghton, John J, & Lillian 
Howard, Elizabeth F. 
Howard, Esther T, 
Hoyt, Harrison & Shirley J. 
Hubbard, Eliot, Jr , 

Humphreys, J. Robert & M. Lillian 
Hunnewell, Willard P. 
Hunsaker, Jerome C # , Jr, 
Hunt, Caroline L. 
Hunt, Merrill, Jr , & Hope 
Hunt, Merrill T. 
Huntley, George F, & Lottie D. 
Huntley, Medford E. & Blanche L. 
Hurd, Joseph &. Nellie M, 
Hurd, Nancy Dabney 
Hurff, Joseph L. & Elizabeth C. 
Husek, Joseph John & Helen 
Hyde, Benjamin D. &, Mildred B. 

Ingard, K. Uno & Doris C. 
Irwin, Constance Root, & Ayer , 

Harriet Root 
Irwin, Mary M, 



Jacks 
Jacks 
Jacks 
Jacob 
Jac ob 
Jagge 
Jame s 
Janes 
Jenne 
Jenne 
Jenni 
Jense 
Jense 
Jevon 
John , 
Johns 



on, Dorothy W. 
on, Gardner, Jr , &, Sallie 
on, Polly F. 
, Fred &, Eva 
s, May L. 

r, James M. & Miriam H, 
, Hamilton R, & Waleska E 
, G. Sargent & Ann B, 
y, Charles J. &, Katrina C 
y, Phyllis M. 
ngs, Charles E. & Ann V. 
n, Holgar J. &, Grace A. 
n, Olin A, & Agnes E. 
, Robert W. &, Virginia B # 
DeWitt &, Morley M. 
on, Albert D. 



$ 5,500 



700 
400 



750 



000 



$ 616,00 

750,40 
828,80 

980,00 



6 


,450 


722,40 


8 


,000 


896,00 


5 


,250 


588,00 


3 


,900 


436,80 


2 


,000 


224,00 


10 


,500 


1,176,00 


5 


,750 


644,00 


9 


,800 


1,097,60 


4 


,200 


470.40 


10 


,450 


1,170,40 


20 


,350 


2,279.20 


1 


, 300 


145,60 


1 


,650 


184.80 


10 


,950 


1,226,40 


4 


,850 


543,20 


4 


,100 


459,20 


12 


r 850 


1,439,20 


9 


,600 


1,075,20 


9 


,000 


1,008,00 


6 


,000 


672.00 


9 


,100 


1,019,20 



784,00 



202 



1, 


,750 


196,00 


12, 


,200 


1, 366,40 


13, 


,250 


1,484,00 


7, 


150 


800,80 


13, 


450 


1 ,506.40 


6, 


700 


750.40 


14, 


200 


1,590.40 


7, 


700 


862,40 


16, 


200 


1,814,40 


7, 


500 


840.00 


6, 


100 


683,20 


8, 


900 


996.80 


10, 


000 


1,120.00 


3, 


350 


375.20 


5 , 


200 


582,40 


7, 


500 


840,00 


7, 


850 


879,20 


3, 


550 


397.60 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 









Johnson, Ernest L. L Grace M. $ 
Johnson, John W. & Josephine 
Johnson, Kenneth A. L Gladys 
Jones , Ir a M. 
Jozwicki, Alfons L Adeline C. 

Kaelber, Edward G. L Patricia C. 
Kane, Henry B. L Elizabeth C. 
Kasperian, Karl D. L Carol 0. 
Kaye, Harold L Alice S. 
Keay, Donald P. & Mary Ann L. 
Keevil, Charles S. f Jr. L 

Hannah M. 
Keily, Delbar P. L Gertrude E. 
Keizer, Harold 
Kelleigh, Beatrice S. 
Kelley, M. Gertrude k Mabel F. 
Kennedy, Albert E. 
Kennedy, Albert E. & John T. 
Kennedy Brothers 

Kennedy, John E. L Katherine J. 
Kennedy, John T. L Albert E. 
Kent, Harold E. L Muriel B. 
Kessel, Joseph B. &. Lesley J. 
Ketchum, Phillips, Jr. & Anne C. 
Keuper, Charles S. &. Elinore W. 
Keyes , Janet T. 

Kidder, George H. L Priscilla P. 
Kindleberger , Charles P. &. 

Sarah M, 
King, R. Bruce, Jr. & Eleanor T. 
King, William T. 
Kingsbury, Roy S. &. Ann B. 
Kinsler, Louise M, 
Kirby, Gerard L. 
Kirkpatrick, David W. & 

Margaret M. 
Kist iakowsky , Irma E. 
Kjellander, Joel & Mary C. 
Kling, John W. &, Louise H. 
Knowles, Harry B. , Jr. 
Knowles, Wilma E. 
Kolligian, Gregory Scott & Zoe 
Kolodny, Myer Z. L M. Lillian 
Kolyshkin, Lena 
Kopp, Jay F. & Marilyn J. 
Korhonen, Edwin J. & Onerva M. 
Kramer, Manuel & Ruth L. 
Kubik, Charles S. & Emily K. 
Kuhns, Roger J. & Roberta B. 



12 , 350 
250 
350 



500 



50 



2 
5 

6 
3 
18 
6 
2 

9 

4 

6 
5 



6 

7 

8 

12 

6 
11 

6 
6 
17 
8 
5 
6 

8 
12 

7 
5 

6 
13 

7 

3 

11 

5 

6 
8 
4 



410 
500 

550 
650 
300 
750 
050 

050 
550 
750 
650 
700 
500 
050 

700 
500 
250 
500 
950 
250 
200 
850 

650 
500 
050 
510 
250 
700 

900 
500 
750 
700 

000 
400 
600 
050 
100 
500 
900 
600 
500 



$1 , 383. 20 

28 .00 

599 . 20 

269 .92 

616.00 

733.60 
408.80 
2,049 .60 
756.00 
229 .60 



1 ,01 

50 

8 

74 

63 

5 

67 

5 

52 

5 

70 

84 

1 ,00 

1 ,37 

69 

1 , 32 



3.60 
9 .60 
4,00 
4.80 
8.40 
6.00 
7.60 
6.00 
6.40 
6.00 
0.00 
0.00 
2.40 
2.00 
4.40 
7.20 



744.80 
728.00 
1 ,909.60 
953.12 
588.00 
750.40 

996.80 

1 ,400.00 

868.00 

638.40 

5,60 

672.00 

1 ,500.80 

851.20 

341.60 

1 ,243.20 

616.00 

772.80 

963.20 

504.00 



203 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Kusleika, Steven & Louise C, $ $ 8,000 $ 896.00 

Lahey, Heirs of James 1,750 196,00 

Lahnstein, Karl F, 3,700 414.40 

Landrey, William J. &, Rita M. 10,050 1,125.60 

Lang, Richard E. &, Betty Lee 5,000 560.00 

Langton, William G. & Jane G, 7,150 800,80 

Lankhorst, Beverly P, 6,700 750,40 

Larrabee, Leonard C, & Peggy S. 5,900 660.80 

Larson, John B. & Mafalda M. 5,000 560,00 

Larzelere, William & Alice J, 4,100 459,20 

Laverty, Charles & Lillian L, 10,700 1,198,40 

Lavine, Jerome M, & Mary C, 7,050 789,60 

Lavrakas, Fofo 1,750 196,00 

Law, John H, & Nancy F. 5,700 638,40 

Lawrence, David B. & Priscilla M, 8,050 901,60 

Lawrence, Lincoln C, & Blanche P, 5,050 565,60 

Lawson, Harold E, 700 100 89,60 

Lawson, Harold E, & Wanda E. 7,600 851,20 

Leathern, Ernest F, &. Evelyn K, 29,750 3,332,00 

Leathern, Evelyn K, 600 67,20 

Leavitt, Donald P, & Christine P, 9,250 1,036,00 

LeBlanc, Alphonse J, & Alice M, 3,150 352.80 

Lee, Paul H. & Frances Sue 700 78,40 

Lee, Shih Ying L May C, 12,250 1,372,00 

Leger, Mary E, 5,700 638,40 

Lemander, William C. & Emily K. 13,000 1,456.00 

LeMann, John 3,500 392,00 

Lemire, Robert A. & Virginia Mae 4,300 481,60 

Lennon, James V, & Elin 4,550 509,60 

Lenzi, Nicholas 400 44 80 

Leslie, Maurice A, & Annie 4,200 470,40 

Leslie, Maurice A, & Paul M, 100 11,20 

Leslie, Paul M. & Elizabeth M, 4,750 532,00 

Levin, Alvin 55 6#16 

Levin, Alvin & Betty 6,875 770,00 

Li, Yao T. & Nancy T, 14,250 1,596,00 

Liddick, Harold S. L Virginia D, 7,050 789,60 

Light, Galen D,, Jr. & Lois M. 6,200 694,40 

Lightbody, JohnW,, Sr . & Muriel 10,000 1,120,00 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 1,000 112,00 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 300 33 60 

Lincoln, John W. & Clarinda Y. 7,450 834,40 

Lincoln Plumbing & Heating Co. 200 22,40 
Lingos, John G, , Stamatia, & 

George 10,500 1,176,00 

Linstrom, Peter J. i, Maybelle L. 5,000 560.00 

Litte, Rudolph 8,500 952,00 

Livengood, Eleanor C, H. 3,850 431.20 

Livengood, James C, 50 5 60 

204 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 63 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Lo, Steven Shlh Ting L Yi-Chao $ 

Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. L Irene P. 

Loesel, Robert A. L Marybell 

Loewensteln, Paul L Sophie 

Long, Dorothy S. 

Long, Leslie B. L Mary Louise 

Lorrey, Mildred J. 

Loud, John F. L Mary L. 

Loveys Corporation 

Loveys, Harriet E., Adm. 

Lummus, John W. L Ann A. 

Lunt, Heirs of Charles 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand 

Lutnicki, Victor A. L Harriet H. 

Lynch, Edward H. &. Madeline M. 

Lyon, Ruth 

Lyons, John J. L Ann V. 

Lyons, Martin & Winifred A. 



I 



MacDo 
MacFa 
Mac In 
Fr 
Mac In 
Mac In 
Ma eke 
Macla 
Mac la 
MacLe 
MacLe 
MacLe 
MacNe 
MacRa 
Mahan 
Maher 
Maher 
Mahon 
Mahon 
Maier 
Malle 
Mallo 
Mallo 
Mai on 
Manna 
Manni 
Manze 
Mar , 
March 
Mar on 
Marti 



nald 

rla 

nis 



, Everett A. &. Ethel W. 
, Charles C 

Jr. It 



rland, Charles C. & Phyllis 



&. Ethel L. 



, Daniel A. , 
ances C . 
nis , I sobe 1 A. 
nis, Shirley A. 
nz ie , Roland C . 
urin, Elfriede 
ur in , Ellen 

an, H. Arnold &. Corinne C. 
od , Edward & Hester M, 
od , Edward, Jr. &. Mary M. 
11, Phyllis 

e, Manning W. & Nina W. 
, Russell P, & Anastasia 
, Raymond &. Gertrude M. 
, Raymond Jay & Adeline 
ey Brothers, Inc. 
ey, Gerald J, & Jeanne M. 
, Emanuel & Sylvia 
tt, Herbert A. & Eva 
y, Robert M. 
y, Robert M, &. Irene C. 
e , Charles 

rino, Joseph & Florence A. 
ng, Joseph J, &, Catherine L, 
Hi, John & Dorothy 
James W. & Edith 
etti, John W. & Sarah G. 
i , Jacques R. 
n, John 0. & Candida W. 



M. 



50 



300 



500 



6 
16 
5 
8 
5 
5 
5 
10 
9 
8 
3 
2 
6 
12 
4 
4 
4 
3 

9 
4 

3 

11 

1 

12 

13 

10 

6 

3 

2 

7 

5 

8 

2 

4 

9 

6 

12 

2 

25 

17 

1 

2 

4 

5 

6 

9 

17 

5 



000 
200 
200 
500 
700 
000 
600 
550 
150 
500 
850 
550 
950 
900 
200 
250 
550 
550 

500 
800 

000 
900 
000 
500 
550 
850 
100 
050 
000 
000 
550 
400 
900 
700 
450 
750 
550 
800 
650 
350 
700 
650 
950 
450 
100 
750 
700 
750 



$ 67 
1 ,81 
58 
95 
63 
56 
62 
1 . 18 



02 
95 
43 
28 
77 
44 
47 
47 
50 
39 



1 ,064 
537 



336 

1 , 332 

112 

1 ,400 

1 ,517 

1 , 215 

683 

341 

224 

789 

621 

940 

324 

526 

1 ,092 

756 

1 ,405 

313 

2,872 

1,943 

190 

296 

554 

610 

683 

1,092 

1,982 

644 



205 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Ma rgaret M . 
Jr. & 



$ 



& Virginia 
& Grace B # 



Martin, Robert T. &. 
Martin, Spencer F., 

Caroline F. 
Mart ini , William F. 

car i , Grace B. 
Mascari, Leonard E. 
Maselli, Aldo G. &. F. Claire 
Mason, Hayden & Jean C. 
Mason, Max, Jr. & Betty M. 
Mason, Richard K. & Ann E. 

Maxwell, Ralph E. 100 

Maxwell, Ralph E. & Phyllis B, 
Mayfield, Glover B. &, Gale S. 
McCarthy, William F. 
McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 
McConnon, George J. & Esther G. 
IfcCune, William J. &. Elizabeth 
McEnness, Harold F. 
McGrath, James F. & Mary F. 
McHugh, Katherine 
McHugh, Mary F, 
McKennan, William & Alice W. 

David B. & Eleanor J. 
David B. & Ernest T. 
Wilmot & Katherine E. 
John W. & Julia C. 
McLeod, James & Ethel B, 
McMurtry, George C. & Rose Mary 
McXamee, John F., Ill 
McNulty, Thomas F. & Mary S. 
McWalter, Maurice, Trustee 
Meade, Edmund J. & Eleanor H. 

id, Varnum R. &, Janice H. 
Melanson, Leonard J. &, Mary 
Mellish, Eugene D. & Nancy 
Menna, Andrew A. &, Frances 
Meriam, Richard S. & Alice 
Merrill, Vincent N. & Anne 

ssina, Jaspare & Grazia 
Meyer, James W. &, Carol H. 
Meyer, Robert V. & Eugenie S. 
Meyers, Saul S. 

Litzer, Raymond E. &. Martha B. 
Millar, Philip N. & Winifred M. 
Millard, Donald A. & Jeannette D. 
Miller, Henry D. &. Mary E. 

Miller, Joseph F. G. 5 

Miller, Joseph F. G. & Paula A.L. 
Miller, Lorraine 100 

Mills, Cecil R. L Lillian M. 



$ 4,850 



Mc Knight , 
McKnight , 
McKnight , 
McLellan , 



G. 

S. 



6 


,400 


8 


,500 


4 


,480 


1 


,100 


8 


,200 


4 


, 600 


5 


,150 


4 


,500 


12 


,050 


5 


, 750 




300 


13 


,300 


3 


,550 


11 


,500 


1 


,500 


10 


,000 




850 


6 


,750 


8 


,750 


4 


, 400 


1 


,350 


4 


,450 


3 


,800 


2 


, 750 


6 


, 700 


5 


,000 


1, 


, 850 


!7, 


,55 


3, 


,450 


6, 


200 


4, 


200 


8, 


400 


7, 


200 


10, 


650 


5, 


300 


4, 


750 


8, 


600 


7, 


200 




650 


17, 


200 


2, 


800 


17, 


750 


8, 


500 


7, 


150 


3, 


750 



$ 543,20 

716.80 
952,00 
501.76 
123.20 
918,40 
515.20 
576,80 
504,00 
11,20 

1,349.60 

644,00 

33,60 

1,489.60 
397,60 

1 , 288,00 
168,00 

1,120,00 
95,20 
756,00 
980.00 
492,80 
151,20 
498,40 
425,60 
308.00 
750,40 
560,00 
207,20 

1 ,965,60 
386,40 
69 4,40 
470,40 
940,80 
806,40 

1 ,192,80 
593,60 
532,00 
963,20 
806,40 
72,80 

1 ,926,40 

313,60 

1 ,988,00 

952.00 

5.60 

800.80 

11.20 

420.00 



206 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Mintz, Norbett L. & Sophie B. $ 

Miser, Hugh J. & Josephine L. 

Mix, Thomas R. & Helen 

Mixon, Scott I. & Isabel m 

Molloy, Joseph E. &. Janet F. 

Monks, John P. (Estate of) &. 

Ann S . 
Moody, Charles P. & Josephine G. 
Moor, Edgar J. &. Joan R. 
Moore, Laurence & Eleanor 
Moore , Paul 

Moore, Robert L. & Dorothy H. 
Morette, Walter J. &, Gertrude C. 
Morey, Kenneth & Ruth I. 
Morgan, Henry M. & Gwen G. 
Morgan, Richard S. & Molly H. 
Morgan, Winfield S. & Catherine 
Morris, Milliage 15 

Morris, Milliage E. &. Beatrice M. 
Morris, Robert E. F. &. Clara D. 
Morris, Robert H, &. Irene S. 
Morse, Thomas R, 

Morse, William H. L Marguerite D. 
Moss, Leonard G. &. Frances S. 
Mount, Wayne D. & Claire L. 
Mr akovich, Vincent F. & Rosemary 
Mukerji, Joan Lothrop 
Mukhitarian, Samuel & Stephanie 
Murphy, Bridget 
Murphy, Cyrus W. &. Persis S. 
Murphy, Daniel J. &. Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W, 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Murphy, William F. &, Ruth M. 
Myles, Theresa Anne L J. Richard 

Naiman, Mark L. & Adeline L. 
Napoli, Joseph J. 
Natoli, Donald J. & Lois M. 
Navon, David H. & Roberta 
Neiley, Alexander H. &, Diana B, 
Neisser, Ulric &. Anna Peirce 
Nelson, Albert E. & Mar jorie E, 
Nelson, Duncan M. &, Jean R. 
Nelson, Erik J # & Dorothy G. 
Nelson, W. Newton & Eleanor R. 
Nesto, Bruno Richard & Eugenia R, 
Neumann, Ernest P. &, Sylvia B. 
Neville, James M. &, Mar jorie J, 
Newbold, Thomas 



$ 



1 
12 
6 
8 
2 

44 

7 

12 

17 

9 
5 

4 

10 

7 

9 

2 
3 
4 

12 
3 
6 
5 
7 

10 
4 
4 
5 
4 
4 
3 

10 

11 

5 

11 
7 

10 
5 

10 
6 
5 
5 
9 
7 

12 
2 

12 



000 
100 
350 
550 
750 

250 
400 
060 
250 
50 
400 
750 
300 
000 
300 
100 

650 
900 
800 
200 
500 
100 
750 
000 
550 
250 
700 
150 
700 
950 
600 
850 
050 

200 
250 
050 
600 
600 
200 
500 
140 
000 
150 
850 
000 
750 
000 



$ 112 

1 , 355 

711 

957 

308 



4,95 

82 
1 , 35 
1 ,93 

1 ,05 
64 
48 

1 , 12 
81 

1 ,01 

29 
43 
53 

1 , 36 
39 
68 
64 
78 

1 ,18 
47 
52 
57 
52 
55 
40 

1,21 

1 ,23 



582 
1 ,260 

789 
1 ,187 

627 
1 ,142 

728 

575 

560 
1,024 

879 
1 ,344 

308 
1,344 



00 
20 
20 
60 
00 

00 
80 
72 
00 
60 
80 
00 
60 
00 
60 
20 
68 
80 
80 
60 
40 
00 
20 
00 
00 
60 
00 
40 
80 
40 
40 
20 
20 
60 

40 
00 
60 
20 
20 
40 
00 
68 
00 
80 
20 
00 
00 
00 



207 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 





Tax on 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 




Estate 


$ 


700, 00 


24 


,158,40 




431,20 




5,60 




851.20 




756,00 




632,80 




632,80 




856,80 




229.60 




789.60 




907.20 




728.00 




470,40 


1 


,069.60 


1 


,618.40 




548,80 


1 


,400,00 




504,00 


1 


,864,80 


1 


,640,80 




560.00 




420,00 




95,20 


2 


,446,08 


1 


,243,20 




806,40 




716,80 




784,00 




672.00 


1 


,181.60 




644.00 




571,20 




896,00 




750.40 




11,20 




985,60 




565,60 




907,20 




806.40 




896.00 




56.00 




459,20 




638,40 




504,00 




117.60 




39.20 



Jr. &, 

& Ethel A. 



Newell , Lena M. 
New England Tel, & Tel, Co, 
Newman, Philip & Elsa L. 
Newton, George C., Jr. 
Newton, George C., 

Elizabeth E. 
Newton, Harland B. 
Newton, Hazel H. 
Nichols, Walter &, Ethel D. 
Niles, Robert L. & Virginia M. 
Norton, Paul L. 
Norton, Paul L. & Margaret 
Novak, Kalraan &, Nellie R. 
Nystrom, Foster H, & Edna C. 

Ober, Clyde L. & Marian N. 
0*Brien, John H, & Barbara M, 
Ogden, David D, &, Joan A, 
Old County Realty Trust 
0'Leary, Paul J. & Alyce M. 
Olivieri, James & Dorothy M. 
Olmsted, Harriet A. 
Olsen, Kenneth H. & Elva-Liisa 
Olsen, Ralph &, Marcia E, 
O'Reilly, Joseph J. &, Camill 
Osborne, Gordon 
Osborne, Gordon & Freda W. 
Ouroussoff Builders, Inc. 
Outten, Henry P. & Nancy K, 
Owen, Charles J. & Mary Lee 



$ 



215 ,700 



50 



A. 
a M, 



850 



Padd 
Page 
Page 
Page 
Page 
Page 
Paig 
Pain 
Pain 
Palm 
Palm 
Palm 
Pane 
Pane 

Pane 
Pane 
Pane 
Paon 
Paqu 



ock, Louis E. &, Ann E. 
Elliott F. & Emily R. 
Lot B. &. Patricia H, 
Milton S, &, Roberta M, 
Stanley W. &, Elisabeth H, 
William N. &, Elizabeth J. 
Richard B. &, Elizabeth 
Albert S. &, Noelle W. 



v » 

er 

er 



Dolores M. 
, Attelio A. & Kathryne 



Eleanor M. 
er, George B. , Jr. & Rosemary 
tta, Frank &, Theresa J. 
tta, Franklin &, Theresa 
tta, James J. & Rosemary D, 
tta, Pasquale &, Mary 
tta, Salvatore & Rita 
e , Mary T, 
ette, Margaret 



$ 6 



250 



850 



7 


,600 


6 


, 750 


5 


,650 


5 


, 650 


7 


,650 


2 


,050 


7 


,050 


8 


,100 


6 


,500 


4 


,200 


9 


,550 


14 


,450 


4 


,900 


12 


,500 


4 


,500 


16 


,650 


14 


,650 


5 


,000 


3 


,750 


21 


,840 


11 


,100 


7 


,200 


6, 


,400 


7, 


,000 


6, 


,000 


10, 


550 


5 , 


750 


5, 


100 


8, 


000 


6, 


700 




100 


8, 


800 


5 , 


050 


8, 


100 


7, 


200 


8, 


000 




500 


4, 


100 


5, 


700 


4, 


500 


1, 


050 




35 



208 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 

Estate 





Tax < 


Dn 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 




Esta< 


te 




828 


,80 


1 


,013 


,60 




257 


,60 


1 


,237 


.60 


1 


,036 


.00 




560 


,00 




767 


. 20 




156 


.80 




812 


,00 


2 


,531 


,20 




515 


.20 




515 


.20 




464 


.80 




11 


,20 


4 


,116 


.00 


4 


,317 


.60 




695 


,52 




638 


,40 




705 


.60 


2 


,077 


.60 




11 


.20 


1 


,752 


,80 


1 


, 243 


,20 




957 


.60 




571 


.20 




896 


.00 




974 


,40 


1 


,019 


,20 




548 


,80 


1 


,176 


,00 


1 


,047 


,20 




649 


,60 




68 


,32 


2 


, 620 


,80 


1 


,003, 


,52 




308 


,00 


1 


,938, 


,72 




750, 


,40 




39, 


,20 




582, 


,40 




481, 


,60 


1 


,176, 


,00 


1 


,948, 


,80 




862, 


,40 


2 


,038, 


,40 




806, 


40 




868, 


00 




728, 


00 



$ 






Claire P. 

El izabe t h 



Pertzof f 
Pertzof f 
Pertzof f 
Peterson 
Peterson 



Parish, Edward C., Jr. L Joan 
Parker, Jackson B. &. Jacqueline 
Parks, Henry A. k Harriett A. 
Parsons, W. Chester &. Claire T. 
Pastoriza, James J. L Ruth B. 
Patterson, Robert F # , Jr. L 

Ma r y An n 
Pattinson, Mary I. 
Pavlo, Samuel G. 
Pearmain, W. Robert 
Peavy, Leopold, Jr. 
Peck, Will V. L Mildred E. 
Peirce, Isabel T, 
Peloquin, Roy J. & Alice M. 

Constantin A. 

Constantin A. L Olga 

Olga 

Frank W. & Mary E. 

George E, &. Bertha S. 
Pettit, Kathreen N. 

Phillips, Henry B. L Charlotte T. 
Pickman, Anthony P. 
Pickman, Anthony & Alice L. 
Pierce, Charles Eliot L Dora R. 
Pike, John A. L Mary S. 
Pino, Frank J. & Muriel E. 
Plant, Paul R. & Madeline L. 
Polumbaum, Theodore S. L Nyna 
Porter, Stanley D. &. Josephine 
Sholera 

Charles L. &. Sophie 
Neil H. & Annie L. 
Clara E. 
Pratt, Nancy A, 
Preston, Jean W. 
Primak, John & Lena 
Primak, Lena 

Quarton, Gardner & Frances 



Radasch, Donald & Margaret R. 

Ragan, Ralph R, 

Ragan, Ralph R. & Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. &, Ellen A. 

Ralston, Robert 

Rand, Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. & Priscilla W. 

Rando, Giovanina 

Rando, Thomas 

Rapperport, Eugene John & Lucy H. 

Rappoli, Arthur E. & Dorothy H. 



$ 



100 



100 



Pos tel , 
Poulos , 
Powell, 
Powers , 



7 
9 
2 
11 
9 

5 
6 
1 
7 
22 
4 
4 
4 

36 

38 

6 

5 

6 

18 

15 
11 
8 
5 
8 
8 
9 
4 
10 
9 
5 

23 
8 
2 

17 



5 

4 

10 

17 

7 

18 

7 

7 

6 



400 
050 
300 
050 
250 

000 
850 
400 
250 
600 
600 
600 
150 

750 
550 
210 
700 
300 
550 

650 
100 
550 
100 
000 
700 
100 
900 
500 
350 
800 
610 
400 
960 
750 

310 

700 
350 
200 
300 
500 
400 
700 
200 
200 
750 
500 



209 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Rawson, Edward B. &. Nancy B, $ 
Reece, Richard C. & Susan W. 
Reed, Kenneth C, L Margaret M. 
Rego, Manuel J. & Catherine 
Rhodes, Timothy & Janet 
Ricci, Joseph, Louis, Fred & 

Charles 
Rice, Arthur W # , Jr. & Pauline K # 
Rice, Earl S. &. Naoma F. 
Rice, James F # , Jr. & Barbara A. 
Rice, Ruth D. 

Rich, Howard L. , Jr. & Ruth R. 
Richardson, Frederick C # 
Richardson, John A. W. & Anna H. 
Richardson, Lyle 
Riley, Allston L Marion H. 
Piley, Margaret A. f Admx. 
Ri^ch, Martin D. &, Joan C. 
Robbins, Roland W. &, Geraldine 
Robey, A. Alexander & Harriet S. 
Fobichaud, George U. &. Emma 
Robinson, Dora A. 
Rodimon, Mildred M. 
Rodrick, William D. L Alice E. 
Rogers, Alfred P. 
Rogers, Alfred P. & George E., 

Trustees 
Rogers, David F. 
Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred &, 

Evelyn 
Rolfe, Edward &. Stephanie 
Rollins, Barbara 
Rollins, J. Leslie & Barbara 
Rollins, Oliver W. & Hala P. 
Rood, Allan &. Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. & Elizabeth M. 
Rooney, John J. & Margaret C. 
Root, Lily Frederica 
Rosane, Marjorie B. &, Richard C. 
Rose, James &. Glenys W. 
Rosenwald, Harold fc Betty Booth 
Ross, Thorvald S., Jr. &. 

Ma rgaret P. 
Ross, William C. & Marian L. 
Rouner, Thomas J. &. Doris J. 
Row, Ronald V. & Jane E. 
Rowe, Lawrence L. L Mildred M. 
Rowe, Standish S. 
Roy, Nancy C. 
Rubissow, George John & Marion J. 



$ 



200 



100 



8 

9 
8 
3 
6 

3 

14 
6 
4 
8 

15 
7 
9 

12 

11 
1 
5 
4 

12 
5 
3 
3 
6 
9 

4 
5 

7 
5 

9 
7 
6 
5 
1 
3 
6 
6 
15 

10 

10 

8 

8 

1 
9 
4 
6 



900 
950 
550 
500 
550 

300 
000 
800 
500 
250 
150 
350 
800 
850 
000 
850 
100 
250 
800 
600 
450 
800 
500 
900 

550 
150 

950 
200 
150 
250 
900 
800 
150 
400 
500 
000 
250 
500 

600 
000 
400 
750 
750 
700 
050 
850 



$ 996 

1,114 

957 

392 

733 



36 

1,56 

76 

50 

94 

1,69 

82 

1 ,09 

1,43 

1 ,23 

20 

57 

47 

1 ,43 

62 

38 

42 

72 

1,12 



509 
576 

890 

582 

16 

1,036 
884 
761 
576 
156 
392 
672 
700 

1,736 

1,187 
1 ,120 
940 
980 
196 
1 ,086 
453 
767 



210 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 





Tax < 


3n 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 




Esta" 


te 




582 


.40 




644 


,00 




386 


.40 




33 


,60 




532 


,00 




420 


,00 




263 


,20 




492 


,80 




330 


.40 




761 


,60 


1 


,164 


,80 




649 


,60 


1 


,719 


,20 




840 


,00 




806 


,40 


2 


,156 


,00 


3 


,242 


,40 




403, 


,20 


1 


,065, 


.12 




750, 


,40 




744 


,80 




61 


,60 




705 


,60 




11 


,20 




201, 


,60 




72 


,80 




935, 


,20 




655 


,20 


1 


,215, 


,20 




980, 


,00 




302, 


,40 




448, 


,00 




851 


,20 




728, 


,00 




873, 


,60 




168, 


,00 




476, 


,00 




784, 


,00 




817, 


,60 




812, 


,00 




84, 


,00 




632, 


80 


2 


,279, 


,20 




588, 


00 




677. 


60 




649, 


,60 




274, 


40 




492, 


80 




772, 


80 



Ruocco, Ralph J. A. & Isabel I. $ 

Russell, James D. & Marguerite M. 

Russes, Richard P. & Mary D. 

Ryan, Frank A. 

Ryan, James J, & Helen 

Ryan, Lawrence 

Ryan, Mary A. 

Ryan , Mary J. 

Ryan, William H. & Mary B. 

Ryer, Russell E, &. Margaret C. 

Rymer, William W. & Louise D. 

Sab bag, Arthur & Evelyn J. 

Sagendorph, Mrs. J. Hansell 

Salmon, Walter J. & Mar jorie B. 

Sampson, Coleman W. & Phyllis E. 

Sanderson, George A. &. Priscilla 

Sandy Pond Trust 

Sartori, Louis R. & Ruth M. 

Satterfield, Charles N. & Anne P. 

Saul, Robert E. & Madeline Louise 

Sawtell, Clement C. &. Adelaide I. 

Sayre , Woodrow W. 

Scanlan, William A. & Esther M. 

Schaal, Albert A. & Zelpha M. 

Schumacher, August 

Schumacher, August &, Mary L. 

Schwann, William 

Schweber, Silvan S. & Myrna R. 

Scott , Anne 

Scott, Hermon H, 

Secora, Julia 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. 

Segadelli, Doris C. 

Selfridge, Oliver G. & Allison G. 

Senders, John W. &, Virginia L, 

Sexton, Maurice J. 

Shambaugh, Benjamin &, Joan D. 

Shansky, David & Nettie 

Shapiro, David &, Esther 

Shapiro, Sylvia C. 

Sharpe, William, Jr. & Elaine D. 

Shaw, Alice DeS, 

Shea, William J. & Margaret T. 

Sherman, Daniel E., Jr. & Sadie J. 

Sherman, Matthew N, & Diane 

Sherwin, Edward V. 

Shimansky, Stanley J. & Eugenia C. 

Shomphe, Patrick W. & Annie B. 



S 



& Eleanor R. 
& John J. 



5 
5 
3 

4 
3 
2 
4 
2 
6 
10 

5 

15 

7 

7 

19 

28 

3 

9 

6 

6 



8 
5 

10 
8 
2 
4 
7 
6 
7 
1 
4 
7 
7 
7 

5 
20 
5 
6 
5 
2 
4 
6 



200 
750 
450 
300 
750 
750 
350 
400 
950 
800 
400 

800 
350 
500 
200 
250 
950 
600 
510 
700 
650 
550 
300 
100 
800 
650 
350 
850 
850 
750 
700 
000 
600 
500 
800 
500 
250 
000 
300 
250 
750 
650 
350 
250 
050 
800 
450 
400 
900 






211 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Hans, Heirs of 



Shurling, Watson & Emily I, $ 

Siler, William C. L Barbara J, 

Silva, Walter J, &, Lucille J. 

Simms, Hugh P. & Margaret J, 

Simonds, Anthony J. 300 

Simonds, Lena J, 

Simourian, John & Lillian M. 

Sisson, John H. & Barbara B. 

Skilton, Edna R. & McDermott, 

Pauline F. 
Smith, Carl D. &, Florence C. 
Smith, C. DeWitt & Margaret L, 
Smith, John E., Trustee 
Smith, Sumner 

Smith, William B. & Mae W. 
Smith, William J. & Barbara J, 
Smulowicz, Bronislaw & Sawera 
Smyth, Robert Ralston & Adella C. 
Snelling, Charles A, 
Snelling, Dorothy R. 
Snelling, Howard & Elizabeth J, 
Snelling, John Rudolf 
Snider, Greta W. 
Sor enson , 
Southack, Theodore L. , Jr. &, 

Marion B, 
Spaeth, Daniel A. & Margaret A, 
Spence, Robert A. & Helen M, 
Spencer, Henry W. & Marguerite G, 
Spooner, Frederick C. & Sarah W, 
Spooner, Lily T. 
Stebbins, Herbert A., Jr. & 

Patricia R. 
Stevens, Charles H. & Patricia 
Stevens, Frank R. & Katherine L. 
Stevens, Kimball C. &, Eleanor G. 
Stevenson, John P. & Patricia A. 
Stockellburg, Arthur A, 
Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 
Street, Earle B. &, Janet H. 
Striker, William W. &, Marjorie B, 
Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr. & Anne H. 
Sullivan, Francis J. &, Gladys S. 
Summers, Richard B. & Winifred F. 
Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 
Swanson, Alfred 

Swanson, Arthur W. &, Helen K. 
Swanson, John, Realty Corp. 
Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 1,500 

Swartz, Eli & Jeanette U. 



$ 



13 
11 

4 
6 

17 
4 

32 
5 
2 
8 
6 
4 
4 
5 

1 
3 

1 
3 
7 
15 
3 
4 

5 
5 
7 
7 
9 
2 
4 
5 
6 
6 
3 
6 
4 
6 
7 
16 



450 
500 
500 
900 
500 
500 
050 
250 

800 
050 
750 
800 
500 
700 
700 
850 
450 
400 
200 
100 
700 
900 
850 

000 
800 
350 
500 
650 
350 

200 
700 
550 
000 
000 
000 
600 
760 
350 
750 
550 
250 
550 
450 
200 
500 



4,500 



$ 162.40 

616,00 

728,00 

548,80 

649,60 

56.00 

1,461,60 

1,260.00 

537.60 
677,60 

1 ,988,00 
537,60 

3 ,640,00 
638.40 
302,40 
991,20 
722.40 
492.80 
470.40 
571,20 
78,40 
212,80 
431,20 

112,00 
425,60 
823,20 
1,736,00 
408,80 
487,20 

582,40 
638.40 
845,60 
784,00 

1,008,00 
224,00 
515,20 
645.12 
711,20 
756.00 
397,60 
700,00 
509.60 
722.40 
806,40 

1,848.00 
168,00 
504,00 



212 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 1963 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 





Tax < 


jn 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 




Esta 4 


te 




632 


,80 




5 


.60 




963 


,20 


1 


,019 


.20 




218 


.40 


i 


,036 


.00 




806 


.40 




408 


.80 


2 


,688 


,00 




901 


.60 


2 


,856 


.00 




173 


,60 


1 


,495 


,20 




912 


.80 




560 


.00 




759 


,36 




476 


.00 




789 


,60 


5 


,572 


,00 




694 


,40 




588 


,00 


1 


,853 


,60 


1 


,540 


.00 




515 


.20 


1 


,444 


,80 




996 


,80 


1 


,131, 


,20 




828, 


,80 




229, 


,60 




84, 


,00 


3 


,360, 


,00 


1 


,915, 


,20 




582, 


.40 




621, 


,60 




425, 


,60 


1 


,131, 


.20 




5. 


,60 


1 


,500. 


,80 




660, 


,80 




134, 


,40 




336, 


,00 




78, 


,40 




504, 


00 




834, 


40 




515, 


20 




296, 


80 




308. 


00 



Sweeney, Joseph E. L Jeanne M. $ 

Swift, Orlando B. 50 

Swift, Orlando B. L Janice B. 

Swift, William N. k Phyllis C. 

Swinconeck, John J. 

Sykes, David F. L Margaret P. 

Sylvia, Lawrence M. L Barbara L. 

Taillacq, Elsie 

Tarbell, George G. , Trustee 

Tarbell, George G. , Jr. &. 

Dorothy C . 
Tarky, Vincent T. 
Tarky , William J. , Jr. 
Taylor, Edward S. 
Taylor, Frederick B. & Lex H. 
Taylor, Theodore C. &. Barbara G. 
Taylor, W. Royce & Dorothy V. 
Teabo, Prince C. L Elizabeth T. 
Telling, Irving &, Jane Cushman 
Tennessee Gas Transmission Co. 49,250 
Tetreault, Arthur H. &. Claire F. 
Tetreault, Arthur Hubert &. Anne G. 
Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. & Laura 
Thomas, Peter A. L Muriel M. 
Thompson, Donald J. 
Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. &, 

Arlene 
Thompson, Lawrence E. & Dorothy 
Thorpe, Margaret M. 
Titus, William A. & D. Marion 
Tobey, Aubrey C. &, Cynthia W. 
Todd, C. Lee, Jr., Eveleth R., 

David, & John 
Todd, Mabel H. 
Toler, Louise C. 

Tonseth, Didrick L. &. Phebe L. 
Torode, Herbert L. &, Lorraine S. 
Torrey, Volta W. &. Geneva DeF. 
Tracey, Elizabeth C. 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. & Joseph R. 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracey's Service Station 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. & Mary G. 
Trueworthy, Thurston C. & Helen F, 
Tucker, Gardner 

Tunnell, Raymond W. & Suzanne D. 
Turner, Charles F. & Winifred A. 
Tyler, Ethel A., Admx. 
Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 



5 , 650 



1,200 
1 ,200 



8 
9 

1 
9 
7 

3 
24 

8 
25 

1 
13 
8 
5 
6 
4 
7 

6 

5 

16 

13 

4 

12 

8 

10 

7 

2 



600 
100 
950 
250 
200 

650 
000 

050 
500 
550 
350 
150 
000 
780 
250 
050 
500 
200 
250 
550 
750 
600 
900 

900 
100 
400 
050 
750 



30 ,000 

17,100 

5 , 200 

5 ,550 

3, 800 
10, 100 

50 
13,400 

4, 700 

3,000 
700 
4,500 
7,450 
4, 600 
2, 650 
2, 750 



213 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 19 6 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Umbrello, Francis & Virginia $ 
Umbrello, Carmel V, 

Valley Pond Realty Trust 

Vance, Jane K. 

Vandell, Robert F. & Margaret E, 

Van Leer, Hans L. 

Van Leer, Hans L. & Mary K. 

Van Leer, R. Karl & Rachel D. 

Van Ummersen, Luther & Lynn C. 

Van Wart, Walter L. & Stephenia 

Venier, Ettore P. & Mary E. 

Vercollone, Edmund S, & Julia 

Vitale, Joseph A. & M. Frances 

Wadsworth, Charles Y, & Virginia 

Waible, Wendell J. & Florence E. 

Wales, Andrew M. & Betty R, 

Wales, Isabel G, 

Wales, R. Langdon & Ruth W. 

Walen, Roger S. & Constance M. 

Walker, Sidney A. 

Wallach, Frances D. 

Walter, Charlton M. & Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. & Julie 

Wang, An & Lorraine C. 

Ward, Thomas D. & Jane L. 

Ward, Walter B, & Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B. , Jr. & Marie L. 

Warner, Henrietta S. 

Warner, John Burton & Barbara K, 

Washburn, Mabel L. & Rachel W. 

Washburn, Rachel W. 

Watts Realty Corporation 

Weatherbee, Robert E. 

Webb, Rosella 

Webster, David & Winifred W. 

Weiss, Alfred D. & Anne Kelly 

Welch, Vernon F. & Leatrice June 

Weld, Richard S. 

Wells, George & Katherine W. 

Wes-Lex Corporation 

Westcott, Vernon C. &, Mary Alice 

Western Union Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Weston, Georgianna H. 

Wethersfield Trust 

Whalen, William B. & Mary E. 

Wheeler, Elizabeth F., Ann H. , 

Mary L. & Gale, Ruth A. 
White, John R. & Gina R. 
White, Katharine S. &, John W. 



$ 5,850 $ 655,20 
200 694,40 



2,100 



12 
10 
4 
4 
13 
6 
7 

20 
6 

11 

14 
8 
8 

10 
9 
1 
4 

15 
5 
5 
4 

12 

10 
5 

1 
3 
6 
6 
8 
5 
5 
10 
6 
6 

4 
6 
3 

21 
13 
14 



500 168.00 

100 235,20 

700 862,40 

450 50,40 

200 1,366,40 

050 1,125,60 

700 526,40 

150 464,80 

850 1,551,20 

000 672.00 

900 884,80 

100 2,251,20 

050 677,60 

700 1,310,40 

650 1,640,80 

700 974,40 

000 896.00 

650 1,192,80 

050 1,013.60 

950 218,40 

500 504,00 

100 1,691.20 

150 576.80 

100 571,20 

750 532,00 

350 1,383.20 

900 1,220,80 

650 632,80 

50 5,60 

050 117.60 

300 369.60 

100 683.20 

200 694,40 

000 896,00 

000 560,00 

950 666,40 

550 1,181.60 

650 744.80 

900 772,80 
235.20 

900 548,80 

000 672.00 

700 414,40 

650 2,424,80 

950 1,562.40 

300 1,601,60 



214 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 196 3 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



White, Robert E. & Marion J. $ 
Whitfield, Thomas J., Ill, L 

Joan Elizabeth 
Wilbor, John S. 
Wiley, G. Arnold L Helen 
Wilfert, Fred J. L Eleanor M. 
Wilfert, Walter A. L Eleanor A. 
Wilfert, Walter A., Eleanor A., 

Fred J. L Eleanor M. 
Willard, Leslie M. L Bernice L. 
Willemin, Julian V. L Jane A. 
Williams, Edwin L., Jr. L Ruth D. 
Williams, William G. & Jane C. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 
Willmann, Werner S. L Ma rgaret M . 
Wilson, Elizabeth & Flaherty, 

Anthony J. 
Wilson, Louise H, 

Wilson, Montgomery S. L Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert D. L Kathryn M. 
Winchell, Gordon D. L Enid M. 
Winchell, Guilbert L Estate of 

Evel yn 
Winchell, Guilbert, Gordon D # , 

Guilbert S., Richard P. L 

Love, Dorothy W. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. &. Amy Jane 
Winship, Lee C. &, Joyce L, 
Winship, Thomas 

Winship, Thomas L Elizabeth C. 
Wirsig, Stanley S. &. Arlene B. 
Witherby, Thomas H. & Marianne J. 
Witherton, John R. & Emily A. 
Withey, Edward L. & Barbara H. 
Wollmar, Dick J. & Mary Lou 
Wood, Frank H. &, Jeanne R. 
Wood, George A., Jr. & Nancy S. 
Wood, James D. & Ruth E. 
Wood , Lizzie 

Wood, 0. Chester & Hilve V. 
Wood, Robert C. & Ma rgaret B # 
Woodington, W. Gordon & Mary L. 
Woods, Henry A. &, Barbara R. 
Worsham, Jack L. & Charlotte A. 
Worthington, Thomas K. &. 

Elizabeth C. 

Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Yeuell, Kay M. & Suzanne R. 
Yore, George P. & Kathleen 



225 



100 



6 , 600 

6,450 
7, 100 
7,800 
5 , 300 
5 , 800 



100 

5 ,000 

5 , 750 
8 , 600 
4 , 300 
1 , 500 
3 , 800 

6 , 300 
1 , 400 

6 ,500 

7 , 200 
7 , 200 

17, 700 



9 , 700 

3 , 650 
8 , 500 



13, 
6, 

13, 
5, 
7, 
5, 
8, 
5, 
5, 
4, 
5, 
4, 
8, 
6, 
5, 



300 
700 
150 
600 
950 
200 
200 
900 
000 
500 
100 
850 
250 
750 
500 



$ 739.20 

722.40 
795 . 20 
873.60 
593.60 
649.60 

11 .20 
560.00 
644.00 
963.20 
481.60 
168.00 
425.60 

705.60 
156.80 
728.00 
806.40 
806.40 

1 ,982.40 



1 ,08 

2 

40 

95 

1 

1 ,48 
75 

1 ,47 
62 
89 
58 
91 
66 
56 
50 
57 
54 
92 
75 
61 



6.40 
5 .20 
8.80 
2.00 
1. 20 
9.60 
0.40 
2.80 
7.20 
0.40 
2.40 
8.40 
0.80 
0.00 
4.00 
1.20 
3.20 
4.00 
6.00 
6.00 



6 , 250 

850 
5 , 700 
4,500 



700.00 

95.20 
638.40 
504.00 



215 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 19 6 3 



Aggrega 


te 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value 


of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estat 


e 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 




$ 5,950 


$ 666,40 






3,600 


403.20 






3,200 


358,40 






6,000 


672.00 






3,700 


414.40 


:. 




700 


78.40 






5,100 


5 71.20 






7,200 


806.40 






3,950 


442,40 



Yos, Jerrold M. L Ann B, 
Young, David B, &, Cora S, 
Young, Edward L, 
Young, Lee A, & Jane C, 
Young, Niels 0. &, Lucy J. 

Zarella, Joseph S, & Lillian M. 
Ziegler, Elmer H, & Hilda M. 
Zinck, Floyd A. & Elma W. 
Zuelke, Laurence W, & Nancy J, 



216 



TRUST FUNDS 

DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Ac count 

Cash balance at January 1, 1963 $ 70.01 

Interest income received in 1963 929.42 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase 

premiums 10.22 

$ 1 ,009 . 65 
Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

Deposited in savings bank 75.00 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 926.42 1 . 004 . 42 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 $ 5.23 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 19 6 3 

Cash on deposit 

Cambridge Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

2000 U. S. Treasury 5% 8/15/64 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 5/8% 5/15/65 

1000 Southern California Edison 3% 9/1/65 

1000 Northern Pacific RR Equip. Trust 2 3/4% 

8/10/66 
1000 Western Maryland RR 4% 10/1/69 
3000 Alabama Power 3 1/2% 1/1/72 

1000 Southern Rwy . Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 
1000 American Tel. L Tel. 2 3/4% 1975 
3000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1979 
1000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2% 1980 
3000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 1983 
1000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 

2000 General Telephone of California 4 1/8% 1988 
1000 Pacific Tel. L Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 
1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 1989 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 



Cash Account 



$ 


5.23 




829 .52 




918. 76 


2 


, 000.00 


1 


, 000.00 


1 


,000 .00 




989 .95 


1 


,009 . 81 


2 


,949 .80 




989.19 




948 . 30 


3 


,047.03 


1 


,023.48 


3 


,046.94 


1 


,000.00 


2 


,018.32 


1 


,011 .90 


1 


.005 . 38 


$24 


.793.61 



Savings bank interest of 1963, paid to Town of 

Lincoln $ 48.96 

Savings Bank Deposits at December 31. 1963 

Middlesex Institution for Savings $ 722.00 

Cambridge Savings Bank 495.5 2 

$ 1 . 217.52 



217 



TRUST FUNDS 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1963 
Interest income received in 1963 
Interest applied to amortize bond 
purchase premiums 

Safe deposit box rent 

Waverly Post 1272, VFW Band, July 4th 

concert 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



3.00 

250,00 

15.86 



$ 282.63 
312.06 

1.30 
$ 595.99 



268.86 
$ 327.13 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1963 



Cash on deposit 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 
1000 Southern California Edison 
1000 Southern Rwy . Equip. Trust 

10/15/72 
1000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 
1000 American Tel. &. Tel. 4 3/8% 



3% 9/1/65 
4 1/4% 

1983 
1985 



1000 Virginia Electric &, Power 4 1/8% 1986 



$ 327.13 

340.09 

69 .17 

1 ,000.00 

989.20 

1 ,000.00 

1 ,000.00 

1 ,029.55 

$ 5. 755.14 



Accumulated income 
Pr inc ipal 



$ 558.25 

5.196.89 

$ 5.755.14 



218 



TRUST FUNDS 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Account 






Cash balance at January 1, 1963 
Income received in 1963: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Codman Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Public Library Fund 
Donations received: 

To establish Edith B. Farrar Memorial Fund 

Mrs. Bradford Cannon, for DeNorraandie Room 
book s 

Mrs. N. C. Gerson, for Public Library Fund 

John A. Carley, for Public Library Fund 

Olive B. Floyd, to establish the Mary Jane 
Murray Farnsworth Library Fund 

Olive B. Floyd, to establish the Alice 
Downing Hart Library Fund 
Withdrawn from savings bank accounts, for 
books : 

Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Codman Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

C, Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Public Library Fund 

Payments per order Library Trustees: 
For books, from Cannon gifts 
from Fisher award 
from trust fund income 
Safe deposit rent 
To Maryalice Thoma, Librarian, Pierce Fund 

income 
Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Deposited in savings bank accounts: 
Edith B, Farrar Fund 
Lincoln Public Library Fund 





$ 217 


.73 


$ 32.24 






22. 22 






6 . 32 






44.56 






19 .52 






92.02 






133.81 






61 .02 






64.92 


476 


,63 




435 


.00 




100 


.00 




100 


.00 




139 


.58 




250 


.00 




250 


.00 


$ 67.76 






52. 78 






40.48 






87.98 






13.36 






18.98 






35.00 


316 


,34 




$2 , 285 


,28 


$183.93 






131 .06 






479 .85 






3.00 






44.56 






108.34 






390.00 






100.00 


1,440 


.74 



Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



$ 844.54 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1963 



Accumul ated 
Income 
on Depos it 



Pr inc ipal 



Total 



Julia A. Bemis Fund 

Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 



$ 47.08 
219 



$684.05 $ 731.13 



TRUST FUNDS 



Accumulated 
Income 
on Deposit 



$ 23.22 



27.63 



22.93 



Codman Fund 

Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

John H. Pierce Fund 

Cambridge Savings Bank 
Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 



George Russell Fund 

Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 
1000 U. S. Treasury 5% 
8/15/64 



George G. Tarbell Fund 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 
Warren Institution for 

Savings 
1000 Southern Bell Tel. 

4% 19 83 
1000 Western Mass. Elec, 

4 3/8% 19 8 7 



C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 18,75 

1000 U. S. Treasury 5% 
8/15/64 



Edith B. Farrar Memorial Fund 
Boston 5<? Savings Bank 
Cash on deposit 



Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 
Cash on deposit 



Pr inc ipal 



Total 



$ 474.59 $ 497.81 



158.89 

500.00 
614.57 



158.89 

500.00 
614.57 



$ 1,114.57 $ 1,114.57 



415.74 



930.00 



443.37 



952.93 



1.000.00 1 .000.00 
$ 1,930.00 $ 1,952.93 



4.14 


147.30 


151.44 


73.53 


991.08 


1 ,064.61 


- 


1 ,000.00 


1 ,000.00 


- 


1 .000.00 


1 .000.00 



$ 3,138.38 $ 3,216.05 



235.46 



254.21 



1 .000.00 1 .000.00 
$ 1,235.46 $ 1,254.21 



390.00 390.00 

45.00 45.00 

$ 435.00 $ 435,00 



250.00 



250.00 



220 



TRUST FUNDS 



Accumul at ed 
Income 
on Depos i t Pr inc ipal Total 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Cash on deposit $ 250.00 $ 250.00 

Lincoln Public Library Fund 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings $198.62 1,538.63 1,737.25 

Cash on deposit 139 . 58 139.58 

$ 1 , 678 .21 $ 1 , 876.83 

Trust fund income on 

deposit 159 .96 159 . 96 

$ 575 . 86 $ 11 , 764.89 $ 12 , 340. 75 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1963 $ 79.34 

Interest income received in 1963 159.72 

$ 239.06 
Payments per order of Selectmen: 

Grants to needy persons $ 15.00 

Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 27.20 45 . 20 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 $ 193.86 

Cash and Securities at December 31. 1963 

Cash on deposit $ 193,86 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 697.21 

2000 U. S. Treasury 4 5/8% 5/15/65 2,000.00 

1000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 1983 1 .000 .00 

$ 3 , 891 .07 

Accumulated income $ 2,666,02 

Principal 1 . 225 . 05 

$ 3 . 891.07 



221 



TRUST FUNDS 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1964 
Donations received in 1963: 

General appeal 

4-H Horse Club 

Lincoln School Association 

July 4 parking fees 

In memory of Matthew H. Doherty 
Interest income 
Interest applied to amortize bond 

pr em ium 
U. S. Treasury bond matured 



Payments per order of Fund Trustees: 
Balance of 1962 grants: 

University of Massachusetts, 

Patrick J. Doherty 
Mass. College of Art, Frances Cibel 
Mass. College of Art, Jeanne Manzelli 
Marquette University, Anne Remmes 
Northeastern University, 

David P. Morey 
Framingham State College, 

Mary Lois Huff 
University of Wisconsin, 
Carol E, Swanson 
First half of 1963 grants: 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture, 

Allen M. Bowles 
Syracuse University, Regina Foley 
Pembroke College, Karla Humphries 
Earlham College, Leslie Miller 
Marquette University, Anne Remmes 
Printing and postage 
Safe deposit box rent 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 
Deposited in savings bank 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



$ 1,522.08 



$1 ,842.50 
200.00 
157,50 
739.54 
298.00 



765.00 



950.00 



73.00 
2,50 

214.28 
2.900.00 



3,237.54 
322.64 

.40 

1.000.00 

$ 6,082.66 



4.904.78 
$ 1 .177.88 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1963 

Cash on deposit 

Provident Institution for Savings 

1000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 

1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 6/1/89 



$ 1,177.88 

7, 723,90 

994,75 

1 .005.38 

$ 10 .901.91 



Reserved for balance of 1963 grants 
Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
4-H Horse Club Fund 
General Fund 



$ 950.00 
1 ,000.00 
1 ,225,00 
7. 726.91 

$ 10 .901.91 



222 



TRUST FUNDS 



BE MIS LECTURE FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1963 

Interest income received in 1963 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase 

premiums 
2000 Southern Calif. Edison 3% 1965, called 



Payments per order of Fund Trustees: 
Jan. 11, 1963 - George Macomber 

- Rent of movie 
March 29, 1963 - David McCord 
Nov. 15, 1963 - Fairfield Osborn 
Printing and postage, notices 
Police and custodial attendance at 

lectures 
Movie projection at lectures 

Safe deposit box rent 
Deposited in savings banks 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



$ 50.00 

50.00 

200 .00 

250.00 

147.49 

22.50 

63. 75 

$ 783 . 74 

3.00 

2, 500 .00 

27.57 



$ 1 , 288.70 
1 , 339 . 76 

9 .18 

2 , 015.00 

$ 4, 652.64 



3 . 314.31 



$ 1 , 338.33 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1963 



Cash on deposit 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

1000 U. S. Treasury 5% 8/15/64 

1000 Southern California Edison 3% 9/1/65 

3000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 

2000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2% 12/1/73 

3000 American Tel. &. Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 

3000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 1986 

1000 Virginia Electric &, Power 4 1/8% 1986 

3000 Western Massachusetts Elec. 4 3/8% 1987 

2000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 

1000 Idaho Power 4 3/4% 1987 

1000 Alabama Power 3 7/8% 1988 

3000 Pacific Tel. &, Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 

3000 New England Power 4 5/8% 1991 

3000 Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe RR Gen'l 4% 1995 



Accumulated income 
Pr inc ipal 



$1,3 
6 



38 
25 



33 
42 



2,027.57 
1 , 000 .00 
952.50 
2,984.25 
1 ,993. 75 
3 ,027.97 
2,913 . 75 
1 ,029.55 
3 ,000.00 
2,000.00 
1 ,012.84 
1 ,000 .00 
3 ,108.42 
3 ,048.01 
3 . 000 .00 


$34.062. 36 


$ 2,159.82 
31 .902.54 


$34,062,36 



223 



TRUST FUNDS 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1963 
1963 Income: 

Interest 

Annuity u/w John H. Pierce 

Rent of Pierce house 

Dental Clinic fees 

Polio Clinic fees 
Interest applied to amortize bond 

purchase premiums 
1000 Southern California Edison 3% 
1965, called 



Payments per order of Selectmen: 

Pol io Cl inic 

Dental care 

Well-child Clinic 

Walden Clinic 

Hospital and medical aid 

Care of Park grounds 

Repairs to Pierce house 
Deposited in savings banks 
Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1963 



$ 1 ,537.41 



$1 ,537.26 






3,000 .00 






600.00 






46.00 






540.15 




5, 723.41 

15.56 

1 .007.50 




$ 


8 ,283.88 


$ 497.30 






341.00 






245.00 






487.50 






1 ,113.58 






400.00 






11.00 






4,000.00 






53.54 




7 .148.92 




$ 


1 ,134.96 



Cash 


on d 


Middlesex 


Provident 


First Nat 


5000 


u. S 


3000 


U. S 


3500 


U. S 


4000 


Fede 


2000 


Sout 


4000 


Int • 


4000 


Amer 


1000 


Virg 


3000 


Niag 


5000 


Paci 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1963 

epos it 

Institution for Savings 

Institution for Savings 
ional Bank of Boston, Savings Account 
. Treasury 4 3/4% 5/15/64 
. Treasury 5% 8/15/64 
. Treasury 3 7/8% 5/15/68 
ral Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 
hern Rwy , Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 
1 Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1979 
ican Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 
inia Electric & Power 4 1/8% 1986 
ara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 1986 
fie Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 



$ 1 


,134 


.96 


2 


, 783 


.33 


2 


,513 


.78 


2 


,098 


.33 


5 


,000 


.00 


3 


,000 


.00 


3 


500 


.00 


4, 


,020 


.74 


1 , 


978 


,39 


4, 


,070 


.14 


4, 


043 


.00 


1 


029 


.65 


2, 


913 


.75 


5 , 


129 


.62 


$43, 


215 


,69 



Commissioners of Trust Funds 

Clement C. Sawtell 
Richard F. Schroeder 
William T. King 



224 






TOWN OF LINCOLN 






Financial Section and Warrant 

of the 

1963 

Town Report 








TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT 
of the 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1963 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PROPOSED 19 64 BUDGET 

The proposed budget for general purposes, excluding the 
Water Department, for 1964 totals $1,425,014. This amount is 
an increase of $69,464 or 5.1% over the approved budget of 1963. 

The Assessors, at the time of writing of this report, do 
not have a final figure for the assessed valuation of the Town. 
However, on the assumption that our total valuation will be 
$9,525,000, an increase of $200,000 from last year, every $9,525 
of additional expenditure will mean $1 more on the tax rate. 

If the appropriations under all the articles in the Warrant 
are voted, and borrowing under certain articles is approved, we 
estimate that the tax rate for 1964 will be $118.00 per thousand 
However, estimation of tax rate at this time is difficult at 
best and for this particular year is subject to more than the 
usual margin of error because of the unpredictable costs of fin- 
ancing of some special articles, and a change in the time of re- 
ceipt of money from the State. 

The totals of the budget of the various departments and the 
percentage change from the previous year are as follows: 



General Government 
Protection of Persons 

&. Property 
Health and Sanitation 
Hi ghway s 
Public Welfare 
Elementary School 
Regional High School 
Li br ar y 
Recr eat ion 
Ceme t er ie s 
Debt Service 
Unclas s i f ied 
Reserve Fund 





% Change 


$ 52 , 827 


+ 6% 


119 , 231 


+ 7% 


16 , 175 


+ 8% 


107, 950 


-3% 


17 , 370 


-12% 


627, 619 


+ 7% 


196 , 307 


+ 2% 


35 , 820 


+ 6% 


8 , 610 


+ 17% 


4, 100 


0% 


175 , 255 


+ 3% 


50, 750 


+ 4% 


13,000 


-13% 



Because of reimbursement by participants 
in certain programs, the total cost to 
the Town in 1964 should be the same as 
in 1963. 



The greater part of the increases in the proposed budget 
come from higher salaries and wages to present employees. We 
estimate that these salary increases amount to $43,000, which is 
62% of the total budget increase. In round figures, proposed 



salary changes of present employees are as follows: 

Library +9.5% 

Teachers +7.5% 
All Other Town 

Employees +5.0% 

Salaries of additional employees, added because of expanded 
needs or improved services have raised the budget by $14,000. 
Thus total proposed salary changes account for 82% of the overall 
budget increase. 

Although the budget increase is the smallest in several 
years, we would caution the Town that only one third of the full 
expense of operation of the new school addition is included in 
1964 because the new buildings will be in use for four months 
only . 



REPORT WITH RECOMMENDED BUDGET FOR 19 6 4 

The Finance Committee Report and its recommended Budget for 
1964 is being published as a "Financial Section to the 1963 Town 
Report". This Section also carries the Town Warrant and the re- 
port of the Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee, which is a 
useful background for current as well as long-term considera- 
tions . 

We recommend the adoption of the appropriations for General 
Purposes in 1964 itemized in the Financial Supplement which 
total $1,425,014. 

We recommend adoption of a budget for the Water Department 
consisting of the several appropriations also shown in detail in 
the Financial Section and totaling $50,697. 

In accordance with the By-Laws, the hearing on the Elemen- 
tary School Budget was held in conjunction with the School Com- 
mittee on January 29. A hearing on the remainder of the Budget 
will be held on Thursday, February 27, at 8 P. M. at the Town 
Hall. The Committee hopes there will be a large attendance at 
this meet ing . 

The various departments returned to the Treasury a total of 
$41,738. of unexpended appropriations. The following is a list 
of all that exceeded $1,000.00: 

Consulting & Engineering $ 1,207.00 

Veterans* Services 2,870.00 

Schools, Instruction 5,366.00 

Schools, Auxiliary 1,701.00 

Cemetery, Maintenance 1,484.00 

Property & Indemnity Insurance 2,502.00 

Reserve Fund 11,364.00 






The Finance Committee allocated a total of $3,635.36 out of 
the $15,000 appropriated for emergencies and unforeseen require- 
ments. The list follows: 



Transfers from Reserve 

Recreation, Swimming Program 
Highways, Snow &. Ice Removal 

& Control 
Collector's Expense 
Selectmen, Out of State Travel 
Interest on Tax Notes 
Premium on School Loan 
Town Hall, Maintenance &. Expense 
Highways, Street Lights 
Highway Building, Maintenance &. 

Expen se 



62. 80 



2 , 835 

120 

158 

230 

22 

14 

69 



33 

00 
70 
00 
86 
13 
47 



122.07 






The Commonwealth has certified "Free Cash" as of January 1, 
1964, to be $119,813.40. This compares with $131,297.69 last 
year . 

The Finance Committee is again sponsoring an article in the 
Warrant for $10,000 for appropriation to the Stabilization Fund 
for foreseeable future expenditures on major equipment items. 

The Town Warrant accompanies this report. The recommenda- 
tions of this Committee on each article requiring funds are in- 
cluded in the Warrant. 






We wish to acknowledge the long and helpful service to the 
Town of Leonard Larrabee who retired from this Committee in the 
spr ing of 1963 . 

The Committee received as always the complete cooperation 
of all the Town Officials in preparing this budget, but we truly 
missed the presence of Charlie Fitts. 



Respectfully submitted, 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Richard B. Bailey 
Ernest P. Neumann 
Paul L. Norton 
Joseph A. Vitale 
John B. Tew, Chairman 






SCHEDULE OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF 19 6 3 
AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 19 64 

Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1963 1963 1964 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
($52,827 - 3.7%) 



EXECUTIVE 



Sel ec tmen 






2. 


Salar ies 


$ 


300.00 


3. 


Selectmen ■ s 








personal exp . 




300.00 


4. 


Expenses 




550.00 


5. 


Out of State 








travel 




-- 



$ 300.00 $ 300.00 

300.00 300.00 

214.00 450.00 

159.00 R 750.00 

1,150.00 973.00 1,800.00 

Executive Officer 
6. Compensation of 
Selectman for 
sp . purposes 5,500.00 5,500.00 

6. Executive 

Secretary -- -- 8,550.00 

7. Expenses 200 .00 199 .00 300 .00 

5,700.00 5,699.00 8,850.00 

Finance Committee 
10. Expense 25.00 15.00 25.00 



Town Office 



15. Clerks, salaries 


12,650.00 


11 ,808.00 


16. Expense 


2,400.00 


2.146.00 




15,050.00 


13,954.00 


* Includes $1050 






to be taken from 






Water Department 






Treasury 






Town Accountant 






20. Salary 


3, 797.00 


3,797.00 


21 , Expense 


350.00 


329.00 



Tr e 



asur er 



13,000.00* 

2.400.00 
15,400.00 



3,861.00 
342.00 
4,147.00 4,126.00 4,203.00 



30. Salary 200.00 200.00 200.00 

31. Expense 1 .000 .00 1 .085.00 958.00 

1,200.00 1,285.00 1,158.00 






Appr opr i at i on 
1963 



Expend itures 
1963 



Recommendations 
1964 



Collector 
40 . Sal ar y 
41 . Expense 



2 ,950 .00 

800 .00 

3 , 750 .00 



Includes $525 
to be taken from 
Water Department 
Treasury 



Assessor s 
50 . Sal ar ies 
52 . Expense 



550.00 

800.00 



La 



w 



55 . Legal 

56 . Expense 



Town Clerk 

60 . Sal ar y 

61 . Expense 



1 , 350 .00 



2,000.00 

200 .00 

2 , 200 .00 



600 .00 

75.00 

675.00 



Election &, Registration 

70. Registrars, 

Salaries 200.00 

71. Election 

officials 150.00 

72. Expense 650 .00 



Planning Board 

80 . Expense 

Board of Appeals 

81 . Expense 



1 ,000 .00 

3 , 400 .00 

250.00 



Conservation Commission 
82 . Expense 



200.00 



Consulting &, Eng. 
85 . Expense 

Town Hall 

90. Custodian 

91. Maint. &, Exp. 



4 , 000 .00 



2,100.00 
3. 685 .00 
5 , 785.00 



2,950.00 

898 .00 R 
3 , 848 .00 



550 .00 
657.00 



1 , 207.00 



2 ,000 .00 

17.00 
2,017.00 



600.00 

57.00 
657.00 



200.00 

103.00 
648.00 
951 .00 



2, 770.00 



205.00 



70.00 



2, 793.00 



2,100.00 
3,699 .00 R 
5 , 799 .00 



$ 2 ,950 .00* 
900 .00 
3 , 850 .00 



550.00 
800 .00 



1 , 350.00 



2 , 000 .00 

200 .00 

2, 200 .00 



600.00 

75 .00 

675.00 



200 .00 

500 .00 

666.00 

1 , 366.00 

2 , 300 .00 
250.00 
200.00 

4,000.00 



2, 300.00 
2.900.00 
5 , 200.00 



Appropriation 
1963 



Expenditures 
1963 



Recommendations 
1964 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
($119,231 - 8.4%) 



Police Department 

100. Salaries 

101. Expense 



$ 35,875.00 

4.060.00 

39 ,935.00 



$ 35,685.00 

3.886.00 

39 ,571.00 



$ 37,677.00 

3^55.00 

41,132.00 



Fire Department 
110 . Salar ies & 
wages 

112. Expense 

113. Hydrant 

service 



23, 108.00 
3,532.00 

3.495.00 
30,135 .00 



25 ,723.00 
3,487.00 

3.495.00 
32,705.00 



R 



29 ,876.00 
3,642.00 

3.495.00 
37 ,013.00 



Communications 

121. Wages 

122, Expenses 



12,700.00 

4.311.00 

17,011.00 



12,372.00 

4.021.00 

16,393.00 



13,200.00 

3.860.00 

17,060.00 



Civil Defense 
123. Expense 

Fire &, Police Bldg . 

125 . Maint, & Exp . 

126. Outside 

rentals 



1,000.00 

3,200.00 

800.00 
4,000.00 



947.00 



3,124.00 



800.00 
3,924.00 



500.00 

3,960.00 

800.00 
4,760.00 



Inspectors of Bldgs . 

128. Inspection 

fees 

129 . Expense 



1,250.00 

100.00 

1,350.00 



920.00 

17.00 

937.00 



1 ,250.00 

100.00 

1,350.00 



Park Department 
130. Tree Warden, 
salary 

135. Salaries & 

wages 

136. Expense 

137. Dutch Elm, 

pr ivate 
property 

138. Mowing 



200.00 

13,374.00 
2,250.00 



500.00 

1.400.00 

17,724.00 



200.00 

12,605.00 
1 , 775.00 



1 .212.00 
15,792.00 



200.00 

13,966.00 
1 ,450.00 



250.00 

1 .550.00 

17,416.00 



Appropriation Expenditures 
1963 1963 



Recommendations 
1964 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 
($16,175 - 1.1%) 



Board of Health 

200. Salaries 

201 . Expense 

202 . I nspec t i on 

services 



$ 5 , 150.00 
500 .00 



1.250.00 
6 , 900 .00 



$ 4 , 520.00 
390 .00 

566 .00 
5 , 476 .00 



5 , 300 .00 
525 .00 

1 . 250.00 
7 , 075 .00 



San i t at i on 
210 . Garbage 

collections 8,000.00 

Inspector of Animals 
230. Salary 100.00 



7,845.00 



100 .00 



9 ,000 .00 



100 .00 



HIGHWAYS 
($107,950 - 7.6%) 



Hi ghway s 









300 . 


Salar ies &. 














wages 


33 


, 266 


. 00 


33 


, 194.00 


302 . 


Maintenance 


31 


,411 


.00 


31 


, 114.00 


303 . 


Equ ipmen t 














main t . 


7 


,120 


.00 


8 


, 668 .00 


304. 


Snow &, ice 
removal &. 














control 


8 


,000 


.00 


11 


, 585 .00 


305 . 


Street lights 


7 


,310 


,00 


7 


. 379 .00 






87 


,107 


.00 


91 


,940.00 


Highway Building 












310. 


Maintenance 














&. expense 


1 


,575 


.00 


1 


,697.00 


Highw 


ay s , Ch . 90 












320. 


Maintenance 


4 


,500 


,00 


4 


,500.00 



* State &, County share of 
$3000 to be taken from 
free cash and returned when 
re imbur sed . 



R 



R 



R 



34 , 700 .00 
26 , 360.00 

6 , 450 .00 



9 ,000 .00 

7 . 340.00 

83 , 850.00 



1 , 600.00 



4,500.00* 



321. Construction 18,000.00 

* State &. County share of 
$13,500 to be taken from 
free cash and returned 
when reimbursed. 



18 ,000.00* 



Appropriation Expenditures 
1963 1963 



Recommendations 
1964 



Publ ic Welfare 

400. Aid to 

C i t izens 

401. Adm.- 

sal ar ies 
40 2. Expense 
403. Veterans* 

services 



PUBLIC WELFARE 
($17,3 70 - 1.2%) 



,$ 15,000.00 

1 ,102.00 
150.00 

3 .500.00 
19 , 752.00 



$ 14,513.00 

1 ,102.00 
102.00 

629 .00 
16 , 346.00 



$ 15,000.00 

1 ,220.00 
150.00 

1 .000.00 
17, 370.00 



EDUCATION 
($823,926 - 57.8%) 



501. Administ. 23,220.00 
501a. Out of State 



travel 

502. Instruction 

503. Other school 

services 

504. Operation & 

maint. of 
plant 

506. Community 

services 

507. Acquisition 

of f ixed 
assets 
509 . Programs with 
other systems 



950.00 
432, 310.00 

41 ,600.00 



68 , 600 .00 
200.00 

8, 746.00 

600.00 

576,226.00 



* Of this sum $1,011.38 
to be taken from 
DeCordova School Equip. 
Fund &, Grammar Sch. Fund 

Regional High School 
510. Reg. Sch. 

District 192,961.00 



22,297.00 

488.00 
426 ,892.00 

39 ,553.00 



68 ,598.00 
126.00 

8,397.00 

1 .185.00 

567,536.00 



22,498.00 
1 ,160.00 

^-3-7-7-6-7-5 -.-&e-* 

43,762.00 



9-4-741^.00 

200.00 



6, 713.00 

1 .200.00 

627,619.00 



192,961.00 



196,307.00 



Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1963 1963 1964 



LIBRARY 
($35,820 - 2.5%) 



Library 












520. 


Salar ie s 




$ 


19 , 656.00 


$ 


19 , 120.00 


521 . 


Books &. 
records 






6 , 700 .00 




6 , 699 .00 


522. 


Expense 






1 , 125 .00 




1 , 112.00 


523. 


Out of Sta 
travel 


te 











$ 21,537.00* 

7 , 200.00** 
975 .00 

75 .00 

27,481.00 26,931.00 29,787.00 

* Of this sum $819.10 
to be taken from 
Dog Tax Receipts 

** In addition approximately 
$600 available in Library 
Trust Funds 

Library Building 

530. Custodian's 

wages 1,748.00 1,716.00 1,748.00 

531. Maintenance 

& expense 4 , 435 .00 3 .913 .00 4 . 285 .00 

6,183.00 5,629.00 6,033.00 

RECREATION 
($8,610 - .6%) 

Recr eat i on 

600. Salaries 5,315.00 4,757.00 5,630.00 

602. Expense 1,420.00 1,132.00 1,475.00 
604 . Swimming 

program 650.00 713 .00 R 1 . 505 .00 

7,385.00 6,602.00 8,610.00 

CEMETERIES 
($4,100 - .3%) 

Ceme ter ies 
700. Interments 600.00 415.00 600.00 

702. Maintenance 

& expense 3 . 500 .00 2 .015 .00 3 . 500 .00 

4,100.00 2,430.00 4,100.00 



9 



Appropriation Expenditures 
1963 1963 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 
($175,255 - 12.3%) 



Town Debt Service 

802. Fire & Police 

Bldg. Bds. $ 5,000.00 

803. Int. on Fire 

& Police 
Bldg. Bds. 

804. Int. on Tax 

Notes 

805. School Bldg. 

Bonds 

806. Int. on Sch. 

Bldg. Bds. 

807. Library 

Bldg. Bds. 

808. Int. on 

Library 
Bldg. Bds. 



2,700.00 

1 ,000.00 

110,000.00 

45 ,555.00 

5 ,000.00 



1 .000.00 
170,255.00 



! 5,000.00 

2,700.00 

1 ,230.00 

110,000.00 

45,555.00 

5,000.00 

1 .000.00 
170,485.00 



R 



* Of this sura $55,000 
to be taken from 
Free Cash 



UNCLASSIFIED 
($50,750 - 3.6%) 



900. Middlesex Co. 

Pension Fd. 

901. Employee Ins. 

&, Hosp. Fd. 

902. Property & 

Indemnity 
Insurance 

903. Dump rent &. 

maintenance 

904. Printing & 

dis tr ibut ing 
town reports 
Preservation of 
town records 



905 



14,529.00 
11,209 .00 

15,500.00 
4,500.00 

3,000.00 
250.00 



48 ,988.00 



14,528.00 
10,518.00 

12,998.00 
4,500.00 

2,188.00 

39.00 
44,771.00 



RESERVE FUND 
($13,000 - .9%) 



910. Reserve Fund 15,000.00 

* Figures in above accounts 
TOTALS ^ 



1,355,550.00 1,301,887.00 

10 



Recommendations 
1964 



$ 5,000.00 

2,520.00 

1 ,500.00 

115,000.00* 

45,360.00 

5 ,000.00 

875.00 
175 ,255.00 



15,000.00 
f 3> %.%$ • & 

11,300.00 



16, 700.00 
4,500.00 

3,000.00 

250.00 
50, 750.00 



13,000.00 



1 ,425,014.00 



Appropriation Expenditures 
1963 1963 



Recommendations 
1964 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



950. Salaries 
951 . Wages 
95 2. Expense 



Pumping Station 
95 3. Maintenance 
&. Expense 

Bond Service 

955 . Bonds 

956. Interest 



TOTALS FOR WATER 
DEPARTMENT 






$ 7 , 325 . 00 

7 , 063 .00 

18.025.00 

3 2,413.00 



5 , 410.00 



10 ,000 .00 
1 . 300 .00 

11 , 300 . 00 



49 , 123.00 



$ 7 , 325 .00 

7 , 434 .00 

13.333.00 

28 , 09 2 .00 



4 , 115 .00 



10 ,000 .00 

1 , 300 .00 

11,300.00 



43 , 507.00 



R 



$ 7 ,575.00 

11 , 784.00 

15 . 325 . 00 
34 , 684.00 



4 ,975 .00 



10 ,000 .00 

1 , 038 .00 
11 , 038 .00 



50 , 697.00 



* Items 950 through 956 to be taken 
from Water Department Receipts 



All items marked R have been increased by Reserve transfers 
and additional appropriations. 

NOTE: In the interest of clarity cents have been omitted 
from the above figures. 



r, 












* 



<£* v 






li 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE 
LONG-TERM CAPITAL 
REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 

1963 



i 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

19 63 REPORT OF THE 
LONG-TERM CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE 



The year 1963 contained no surprises from the point of view 
of capital expenditures and planning. Consequently, the sum- 
mary in Table I repeats the figures shown last year with only 
minor changes . 

yond , the Long-Range Capital Requirements 
conomy-size crystal ball and endeavored with 



g' 



~ e>~~~ »— ~» — - «»•«»»«»•«■ . v-^^t,..- — ~~ ...... -~~ ... ^. j ~v- ~ .. ~ w 

nificantly. Considerable blocks of land, such as Codman and 
DiPerna, could come on the market soon and add to the large num- 
ber (roughly 80 to 100) of lots currently for sale. Such a 
surge could increase the growth rate sharply over a period of a 
few years. The 701 study of land use now in progress should 
indicate action that could be taken by the Town affecting this 
growth rate. Another important influence could be the bill now 
being considered by the State Legislature setting a maximum lot 
size considerably less than Lincoln's 2-acre zoning. Given all 
these factors that can change Lincoln, we expect to revise our 
growth predictions each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Russell L. Haden, Jr., Chairman 1965 

Richard C. B. Clark, Secretary 1964 

Robert Donaldson 1966 

Elliott V. Grabill, Selectmen 
Richard B. Bailey, Finance Committee 
R. Langdon Wales, Planning Board 



13 



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19 



EXAMINATION OF DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS 



1 . CEMETERY 

The Commissioners have reviewed their possible future re- 
quirements and feel it doubtful that any heavy capital expendi- 
ture will be needed. To allow for contingencies, $5,000 is 
still estimated for 1965, reduced from the $25,000 which has 
been carried in the past few budgets. 



2. LIBRARY 

The Trustees again made good use of their annual appropria- 
tions and now feel that they can do without the minor capital ex- 
penditures that have been carried in the budget for building 
renovation. The major outlay of $20,000 for finishing and 
equipping the basement room under the addition is continued, how- 
ever. Its exact timing is not clear, but 1966 is still con- 
sidered probable. 

3. PLANNING BOARD AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Among other duties, these two groups share the program of 
recommending the acquisition of lands for town and conservation 
uses. The program to purchase the Garland land continues. To 
date $12,000 of the purchase price of $20,000 has been paid and 
payments of $4,000 are scheduled in 1964 and again in 1965 from 
the Conservation Fund. The State reimburses the Town for up to 
fifty percent of these expenditures. 

The Planning Board has requested an appropriation of $4,650 
to be added to the Conservation Fund and a similar amount to the 
Stabilization Fund for 1964 and has projected future estimates 
through the year 1969. These estimates are computed at one- 
twentieth of one percent of the assessed valuation of the Town. 
Legislation currently before the General Assembly provides for 
reimbursement by the State up to $15,000 in any one year for 
Conservation Fund money expended on approved projects. If this 
legislation is approved, the estimates of appropriations to the 
Conservation Fund in future years will undoubtedly be increased 
in order to speed up the land acquisition program. 

4. RECREATION 

1963 - No capital projects were proposed or carried out 

in 1963 . 

1964 - As indicated in the 1962 Report, the Recreation Com- 
mittee was in the process of carrying out studies relative to 

the purchase of land to be used and developed for the recreation- 
al activities. Consistent with this study, the Recreation Com- 
mittee will recommend that a portion of the DiPerna land in North 



20 



Lincoln be purchased to provide facilities for recreation in 
North Lincoln. This area is not adequately served by present 
recreational facilities. No cost figures for the land being 
considered for recreational use are available as of January 31, 
1964, as it may be proposed that the entire DiPerna site be pur 
chased by the Town for several municipal purposes including a 
possible future school site, conservation and recreational uses 

Future - No additional capital projects are being proposed 
at this t ime . 



5. SELECTMEN 

A. Protection of Persons and Property : 

( 1 ) Police Department 

The policy of replacing one of the two police 
cruisers each year is being set aside this year because the car 
scheduled to be turned in is in excellent condition. The gener- 
al improvement in quality of automobiles plus the availability of 
a town mechanic to care for town vehicles suggests that considera- 
tion be given to a three-year life instead of two for police 
cruisers. The cruiser replacement program has been revised to 
r ef 1 ec t this. 

( 2 ) Fire Department 

The purchase of a 4-wheel drive forest fire ve- 
hicle has been rescheduled to 1964 from 1967 because the Fire De- 
partment feels that quicker and more effective coverage of brush 
fires is needed now. In 1965 a new pumper is scheduled to be 
purchased to replace one of the old pieces of equipment and in 
1966 an expenditure of $50,000 is planned for a new manned North 
Lincoln fire station. It is anticipated that part or all funds 
required for the new pumper could come from the Town's Stabiliza- 
tion Fund. The timing of this new building is contingent upon 
the final decision in the relocation of routes 2 and 2A. 

(3) Civil Defense 

No expenditures are being planned at this time. 

B. Highway Department 

The 1964 planned expenditure of $15,360 provides for 
resurfacing areas on Sunnyside Lane, Page Road, Old County Road, 
Weston Road and Conant Road. This expenditure will be supple- 
mented by two non-recurring grants of $9,352.83 each from the 
State, one under Chapter 782, Acts of 1962, and the other under 
Chapter 822, Acts of 1963. These two sums will be spent in re- 
surfacing Weston Road from Silver Hill Road to the Weston line 
and on Winter Street and Old Winter Street. Following completion 
of this program, planned expenditures will drop back to $25,000 
annually. This is the same amount as previously anticipated but 
reported as $35,000 annually. The $35,000 included $10,000 for 

21 



patching, mowing, painting white lines, etc., and this committee 
feels that these activities are of a maintenance nature rather 
than capital and has deleted them from the capital requirements 
program, although they still appear elsewhere in the Town budget. 

Chapter 90 funds through 1963 have accumulated to $36,000 
and another $18,000 is available this year, for a total of 
$54,000. It is proposed that $4,500 be spent on Bedford Road 
and $36,000 on the project to improve Route 117, leaving $13,000 
carryover to 1965. This carryover, together with the normal 
$18,000 planned expenditure, makes $41,000 available for 1965 
Chapter 90 work. Two-thirds of Chapter 90 expenditures are re- 
imbursed, one-third by the state and one-third by the county; 
therefore, net expenditure by the Town is only one-third of the 
amounts described. 

Equipment 

No major highway equipment purchases or replacements were 
made last year. $6,000 was budgeted for 1963, in line with the 
overall program of evening out these major expenditures, and this 
amount, therefore, is carried over into 1964. This year the 
2-ton 1956 Chevrolet truck, which has over 50,000 miles on it, 
is to be replaced with a three- or four-ton dump truck at an es- 
timated cost of $6,500. In addition, a tractor with front-end 
loader is to be purchased to supplement the Michigan, which is in 
almost constant use. 

C . Town Hall Repairs 

The repair work to the exterior of the Town Hall orig- 
inally scheduled to be done one-half in 1963 and the other half 
in 1964 was postponed and the appropriation carried over to 1964. 
The entire job is to be completed this year. 

D. It has now become imperative that a new dump location 
be obtained since the Minute Man Park Commission wants the town 
to stop using the present dump as soon as possible. A site is 
to be obtained in 1964, and this site will be developed and 
equipped for dump operation in 1965. 



6. LINCOLN SCHOOLS 

With the anticipated completion of the additions to Hartwell 
and Smith schools, no future building is anticipated until at 
least 1967. At the present time, the school population has be- 
come temporarily stabilized. Much depends on what home building 
takes place in Lincoln between now and 1967 in terms of whether 
new school construction will be necessary at this time. It is 
expected that the total school population will be 1,000 pupils 
in September, 1964, which is unexpectedly less than the consensus 
of long-term predictions for 1964. If the school population 
remains stabilized, the new school construction could be post- 
poned. If the rate of new building increases in the next year, 
or there is a turnover of houses with more children moving in 
than leaving, the school population could be increased. 

22 



The present complete set of buildings, including that under 
construction and Center School, will provide teaching spaces for 
1,300 children, which school population will be reached in 1970, 
using the 2% growth rate suggested by the LRCR Committee. Be- 
fore we reach this point, plans will have to be made to provide 
adequate facilities for Physical Education and other specialized 
teaching spaces, such as library, etc., as called for in the 
Boyer report. This group of buildings, as projected in our last 
year's report, calls for an amount of $500,000 probably to be 
spent in 1967. The most recent land taking should be adequate 
to include this additional construction. The minor amounts of 
$9,000 per year previously budgeted are continued. 

7. STABILIZATION FUND 

1963 - A total of $34,550 was appropriated into the Town's 
Stabilization Fund at the 1963 Annual Town Meeting tentatively 
earmarked for future capital expenditures as follows: $20,000 for 
school construction, $4,550 for future land purchases, and 
$10,000 for other capital projects such as the North Lincoln Fire 
Station, new dump, etc. Monies in the Stabilization Fund as of 
December 31, 1963, are shown in Table 4 under Item 7. 

1964 - The Finance Committee and this Committee will again 
recommend that the Town appropriate additional sums into the 
Stabilization Fund at the 1964 Annual Town Meeting for the pur- 
poses used in prior years. The amounts suggested will undoubt- 
edly be similar but will depend on an analysis of overall 1964 
budget figures. Use of the Stabilization Fund to assist in the 
Regional School District financing may be proposed at the Special 
Town Meeting to be called in the fall of 1964 to approve the Dis- 
trict's borrowing to finance construction of an addition. 

8. CONSERVATION FUND 

1963 - $4,550 was appropriated into the Town's Conservation 
Fund in 1963 and $4,000 of this amount was immediately appropria- 
ted out of the Fund as planned to pay the third installment on 
the purchase of the Garland property. The balance in the Fund 
as of December 31, 1963, is shown under Item 8 of Table 4. 

1964 - The Planning Board and the Conservation Commission 
will ask that $4,650 be appropriated into the Fund in 1964 with 
$4,000 appropriated out of the fund to pay the fourth of five in- 
stallments on the Garland property purchase. 

9. WATER DEPARTMENT 

1963 - The section of substandard main on Tower Road north 
of Route 117 was replaced as scheduled. In addition, approxi- 
mately one mile of new pipe was added to the system in the Demone 
and Todd subdivisions at the developer's expense. Supervision 
of this new construction required so much time that several minor 
projects planned for 1963 will be carried over to 1964. 

23 



The Board of Fire Underwriters made a survey of the Town 
during the summer of 1963. Their report indicated inadequate 
pressure and flow in several areas of the system. The Water 
Commissioners have been aware of this situation, but the report 
will serve to accelerate the schedule for water main replacement. 
It has caused the water department to plan an extensive water 
main cleaning program for the spring of 1964. 

1964 - The South Lincoln area has been plagued with dis- 
colored water in recent months, a situation that is prevalent to 
some degree on all of the substandard mains. Extensive flush- 
ing under pressure has afforded only temporary relief and until 
the water main cleaning project is completed the flushing has 
been set up on a scheduled basis in an attempt to keep the situa- 
tion under control. 

The Water Commissioners hope to restore full pressure and 
flow to the affected six-inch mains by mechanical cleaning in 
some instances combined with the installation of 3000 feet of 
new six-inch main on South Great Road west from Lincoln Road to 
the traffic lights at CQncord Road (Rte. 126). In addition, 
2000 feet of four-inch main on Old Winter Street will be replaced, 
with the combined total of the water main installations being 
approximately $50,000, which amount will be borrowed. The pipe 
cleaning program will cost $15,000 and must be paid for from 
Water Department revenues. 

An expenditure of approximately $3000 is planned for engin- 
eering and legal services in connection with the Tower Road well 
project in 1964. Only the preliminary land survey of the area 
was completed in 1963 and detailed bounds and clear land titles 
are still to be determined. This $3,000, plus another $3,000 
for a four-wheel drive truck to replace a 1956 truck, will be 
taken from water department surplus or current revenue. 

The Selectmen plan to propose an article for the installa- 
tion of water mains on Sandy Pond Road. Payment for this will 
come from assessment to abutters on the proposed new line and a 
$13,000 contribution from a developer. This will be a Town spon- 
sored project, if undertaken, and will have no effect on water 
department revenues. 

Future - The completion of the engineering survey of the 
water system will enable the Commissioners to plan in 1964 for 
the future capital program necessary to bring the water system to 
an efficient level of operation. Until these plans are worked 
out specifically, a figure of $30,000 annually is provided for in 
this report for development of the new water source, including 
mains and $10,000 to $15,000 for annual water main replacement. 

10. LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT (GRADES 9-12) 

1963 - The anticipated request for planning funds material- 
ized with the amount requested increased from the forecasted 
$20 , 000/$25 , 000 to a figure of $40,000. This increase will allow 
for the completion of a master plan covering the expansion of 
facilities at the District High School up to an enrollment figure 

24 



of 3,000 students in grades 9 through 12. Planning costs are 
100% reimbur seable by the State if the project is voted and 
actually constructed. 

The report of the Regional High School Building Study Com- 
mittee, completed in April of 1963, indicated that an addition 
to the present facilities must be available for occupancy by the 
fall of 1966 to accommodate the then expected enrollment of 1250 
to 1300 pupils from Lincoln and Sudbury. The capacity of the 
present school plant is approximately 1,050. Accordingly, a 
building committee was appointed, an architect selected, and 
$40,000 of planning funds authorized to carry the planning 
through the preparation of a master plan for the District and the 
preparation of preliminary plans for the next addition. 

1964 - The present schedule calls for the master plan com- 
pletion in the spring of 1964 with preparation of preliminary 
plans during the summer for that phase of the master plan to be 
constructed in 1965 and 1966. The District School Committee 
anticipates authorizing the bond issue financing the project in 
September of 1964, immediately followed by town meetings in both 
towns to approve the District's action. Based on an addition 
capable of housing 800 additional pupils, the total project cost 
is estimated to be $2,000,000, with Lincoln's share approximately 
25% or $500,000. This amount to be bonded could be reduced to 
$1,800,000, and Lincoln's proportionate share to $450,000, if 
both Towns voted use of Stabilization Fund monies. This may be 
proposed at the fall Special Town Meetings in both Towns called 
to approve the bond issue. It is anticipated that the addition 
project will be bid out in February of 1965 and a construction 
contract awarded in March, thus allowing a minimum of fifteen 
months for construction. The bonds financing the project would 
be issued in the late winter of 1965, with the major impact from 
the financing reflected a year later in the 1966 tax rates of 
both Towns . 



Future - The 
vide for the order 
Sudbury of a 3,000 
in such a way that 
complete high scho 
should events and 
quent facilities o 
that much study wi 
future alone. Un 
cult to place a pr 
al building is ant 
a bond authorizati 
tion becomes clear 
estimated 25% shar 
the capital budget 



long range plan presently under study will pro- 
ly development on the present District Site in 
pupil high school. The plan will be developed 
each building phase will provide a relatively 
ol plant at that particular pupil capacity 
circumstances dictate the building of subse- 
n another site. It is clear at this point 
11 be required on this aspect of the District's 
til the master plan is completed it is diffi- 
ice tag on future capital costs but no addition- 
icipated prior to the fall of 1970 or 1971, with 
on coming one year earlier. Until the situa- 
er , a figure of $500,000, representing Lincoln's 
e of a $2,000,000 project will be carried in 



25 



TABLE 3 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 
TOTAL 19 6 3 EXPENDITURES AND RECEIPTS 



RECE IPTS 

1. 1963 Taxes on polls and property collected 

in 1963 

2. Taxes on polls and property levied in prior 

years and collected in 1963 

3. Excise Taxes collected in 1963 (chiefly 

motor vehicles) 

4. Receipts from Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

(other than Items 5 and 6) 

5. Chapter 90 Highway Construction Assistance 

(State and County) 

6. State School Construction Assistance Payments 

(including $100,000 matching funds) 

7. Hanscom Air Force Base School Operation 

8. Other Federal Receipts and Grants 

9. Proceeds from sale of School Project Loan 
10. Other Current Receipts 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $2,400,741.65 

(1) Excluding amounts borrowed in anticipation of 
1963 Taxes and amounts withheld from Town 
employee salary payments totalling $399,971.87. 



$1 ,018 


,052, 


,51 


16 


,070, 


,32 


108 


,310, 


.21 


198 


,250. 


.70 


1 


,632, 


,36 


124 


,713, 


,65 


324 


,735, 


,05 


28 


,268, 


.74 


95 


,119, 


99 


85 


,616, 


,25 



EXPENDITURES 

11. Total 1963 Town Expenditures 

12. Water Department Expenditures 

13. Total 1963 Town and Water Department 

Expenditures 

14. 1962 Capital Expenditures (See Table 2) 

15. 1962 Current Expenditures (13 minus 14) 

(Including payments on Town and 
School District Debt) 



$1,905, 706.75 
54.092.74 



$1 ,959 ,799.49 
247.236.08 



$1,712,563.41 ( 



(2) Excluding payment of tax anticipation notes and 
Town employee deductions totalling $399,903.63. 



26 



TABLE 4 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

19 6 3 VITAL STATISTICS 



l a Town Debt, December 31, 1963 

(Including Water Debt) $1,653,000.00 

2. Town Borrowing Capacity, January 1, 1964 $ 333,154.00 

3. Free Cash, January 1, 1964, as certified 

by Director of Accounts $ 119,813.40 

4. 1963 Assessed Valuations: 

a. Real and Personal Property $9,328,245.00 

b. Motor Vehicles $1,882,490.00 

5. 1963 Tax Levies: 

a. Real and Personal Property $1,044,875.00 

b. Motor Vehicles $ 124,244.35 

6. 1963 Tax Rates (Per $1000 of valuation): 

a. Town of Lincoln - Real and 

Personal Property $ 112.00 

b. Massachusetts Motor Vehicle 

Excise Rate (1) Ceiling of 

$66.00 placed on this rate 

in 1960 $ 66.00 

7. Town Stabilization Fund: Balance - 

December 31, 1963: 

a. Tentatively earmarked for future 

school construction $ 20,000.00 

b. Tentatively earmarked for future 

land purchases 19,050.00 

c. Tentatively earmarked for other 

future capital expenditures 18,000.00 

d. Increment from income and gains 8.485.62 

Total Stabilization Fund, Dec. 31, 1963 $ 65,535.62 

8. Town Conservation Fund, Dec. 31, 1963 $ 1,021.04 



27 







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28 






WARRANT 
1964 NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in 
said Coun t y : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify the legal voters of said Town of Lincoln quali- 
fied to vote in Town Meeting for the transaction of Town 
Affairs to meet in the Charles S. Smith School in said 
Lincoln on Monday, the sixteenth day of March next, at 
7:30 o'clock P. M. then and there to act on the following 
articles except Article 1, and also to meet at the Fire 
and Police Building on Saturday, the twenty-first day of 
March next, at eight o'clock A. M. , then and there to act 
on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of this 
Warrant, by you attested, in said Town seven days at 
least before the sixteenth day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, 
March twen t y - f i r s t , will be opened at 8 o'clock A.M. and 
may be closed at 7 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1 . To bring in their votes for one member for 
each of the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Assessor for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

School Committee member for three years 

Regional School Committee member for 

three year s 
Water Commissioner for three years 
Tree Warden for one year 
Board of Health for three years 
Cemetery Commissioner for three years 



29 



Planning Board member for two years 

Planning Board member for five years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for 

three years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

Director of DeCordova and Dana Museum 

and Park for four years 

ARTICLE 2 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selec tmen 

ARTICLE 3 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board, or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any of 
its members and to fix additional compensation of such 
member s . 

Sel ectmen 

ARTICLE 4 . To determine whether the Town will vote to(^ 
empower the Selectmen to appoint an Executive Secretary 
for a term of three years, under the provisions of Gen- 
eral Laws, Chapter 41, Section 23A, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 6 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue of the financial year beginning Jan- 
uary 1, 1965, and to issue a note or notes therefor, pay- 
able within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accord 
ance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Selectmen 



30 



ARTICLE 7 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 to be added to the Sta- 
bilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of the 
Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 
1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 8 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to be added to the Sta- 
bilization Fund established pursuant to the vote of the 
Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 
1959, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 9 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
conduct services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, 
appoint a committee, raise and appropriate the sum of 
$250.00, or any other sum, or take any action relative 
thereto . 

Sel ec tmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 10 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
request the Trustees under the Will of Julian DeCordova 
to pay over to the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park one 
hundred per cent (100%) of the B Trust net income for the 
year 1964, or take any other action relative thereto. 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park Directors 

ARTICLE 11 . To determine whether the Town will authorize 
the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to con- 
tinue its annual contract with U. S. Commissioner of Edu- 
cation to operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom 
Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

School Committee and Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5,800.00, or any other 
sum, for the purchase of a Highway 3-4 ton dump truck, to 
replace existing equipment, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto . 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

31 



a> 












ARTICLE 1 3 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00, or any other 
sum, to make necessary repairs to the outside of the Town 



Hall, or take any other action relative thereto. 



2 



<o 



Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 



<y 






ARTICLE 14 . To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



o 



\Q> 



\ 



ARTICLE 15 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $4,900.00, or any other sum, for 
the purpose of purchasing a Forest Fire Truck, for the 
use of the Fire Department, or take any other action rel- 
ative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee suggests deferring) 

ARTICLE 16 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $9,352.83 for the purpose of re- 
pairing Weston Road (from Silver Hill Road to the Weston 
line) under the provisions of Chapter 782 of the Acts of 
1962, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 17 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
appropriate the sum of $9,352.83 for the purpose of re- 
pairing Old Winter Street, also Winter Street (from Old 
Winter Street to Old County Road), under the provisions 
of Chapter 822 of the Acts of 1963, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 18 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5,500.00, or any other 
sum, for the purchase of a tractor for the use of the Hig 
way Department, or take any other action relative thereto 

Selectmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 



32 



ARTICLE 19 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
celebrate Independence Day, the fourth of July, appoint 
a committee, raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, 
or any other sum, or take any action relative thereto. 

Selec tmen 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 20 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $4,650.00, or some other 
sum, to be added to the Stabilization Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 23 of the 
1959 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action rela- 
t ive thereto . 

Planning Board and Conservation Commission 
(^Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 21 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $4,650.00, or some other 
sum, to be added to the Conservation Fund established pur- 
suant to the vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 1961 
Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Planning Board and Conservation Commission 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 22 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire for conservation and recreational purposes by 
eminent domain, purchase, or in any other way, from 
Joseph and Mira C. Garland, a certain parcel of land on 
Sandy Pond Road, shown as Lot 4 on a plan entitled "Divi- 
sion of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned by Joseph 
and Mira C. Garland", recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds in Book 9955, Page 511, said par- 
cel having an area of 1.89 acres, more or less, reserving 
to Joseph and Mira C. Garland for their joint lives and 
life of the survivor the exclusive occupancy and use of 
said lot and the buildings thereon, and for such purposes 
to expend from monies in the Conservation Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 13 of the 
1961 Annual Town Meeting, the sum of $4,000.00, or some 
other sum, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board and Conservation Commission 
(Finance Committee approves) 



33 






ARTICLE 2 3 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
amend section VI-B of its Zoning By-Law by adding a new 
paragraph 8 (Exception for Cluster Development in an R-l 
Single Residence District) thereto, as proposed in a not- 
ice now on file with the Town Clerk, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 24 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
amend paragraphs VI-D-2, VI-D-3, and X-B-5 of the Zoning 
By-Law as proposed in a notice now on file with the Town 
Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 25 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
acquire for conservation and recreational purposes by 
eminent domain, purchase, or in any other way, from 
Anthony J. DiPerna, et als, a certain parcel of land on 
the northeast side of the Concord, Turnpike, containing 50 
acres more or less, and to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money therefor from taxation, borrowing, under authority 
of General Laws, Ch. 44, Sec. 8, Clause (5), the Stabili- 
zation Fund established pursuant to the vote of the Town 
under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959, 
available funds, or any combination thereof, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Planning Board and Conservation Commission 
(Finance Committee will comment at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 26 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, or any other 
sum, for the use of the Planning Board in obtaining op- 
tions for the purchase of land, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Planning Board 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 27 „ To determine whether the Town will vote to 
accept the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Sectioi 
42G, H and I, concerning special assessments to meet the 
cost of laying water pipes, or take any other action rela 
t ive thereto . 

Selectmen, Planning Board and Water Commissioners 



34 



ARTICLE 28 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
extend the water main on Sandy Pond Road to the Concord 
line and construct a water main on Fox Run; to establish 
a special assessment against abutters on said roads under 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 42G; 
and to raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor from 
taxation, borrowing, available funds, or any combination 
thereof, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Planning Board and Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee will comment at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 29 . To determine whether the Town will accept a 
gift of $9,524.00 from John E. Moore to defray a portion 
of the cost of extending the water main on Sandy Pond Road, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Planning Board and Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee will comment at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 30 . To determine whether the Town will raise and 
appropriate the sum of $6,942.00 for the purpose of dis- 
charging the lien to be imposed upon land owned by the 
Town as a result of the assessment voted ander Article 28, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Planning Board and Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee will comment at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 31 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
instruct the Water Board to conduct a pipe cleaning pro- 
gram, to raise and appropriate the sum of $15,000.00, or 
any other sum, therefor, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee approves) 

ARTICLE 32 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
instruct the Water Board to replace approximately 2000 
feet of existing 4" main on Old Winter Street with a 6" 
main with appropriate fittings, to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $20,000 therefor, and determine whether the 
money shall be provided for by borrowing under authority 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (5), or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee approves) 

35 



ARTICLE 33 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
authorize the Water Board to purchase a 1964 4-wheel 
drive truck, to replace existing equipment, and to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00, or any other sum 
therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee will comment at Town Meeting) 

ARTICLE 34 . To determine whether the Town will vote to 
instruct the Water Board to replace approximately 3000 
feet of six inch main on South Great Road, from Lincoln 
Road to Concord Road, with ten inch cement asbestos pipe 
with appropriate fittings, to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $30,000.00 therefor, and determine whether the 
money shall be provided for by borrowing under authority 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (5), or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 
(Finance Committee approves) 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the 
time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands 
this 7th day of February in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and sixty-four. 



Elliott V. Grabill 
Warren F. Flint 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



36 




Annual Report 1964 
incoln. Massachusetts 



Art work on cover of 1964 
Town Report courtesy of 
Foster Nystrom, DeCordova 
Museum 



CONTENTS 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Officers and Committees 14 

Town Clerk 23 

FINANCE 

Treasurer 66 

Town Accountant 73 

Collector of Taxes 99 

Board of Assessors 101 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Departments 104 

Parks Department 109 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 110 

Inspector of Animals 113 

Board of Public Welfare 114 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 116 
Land Use and Town Finance Study, 

Summary Report 121 

Board of Appeals 163 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring & 

Plumbing 165 

Water Commissioners 166 

Building Code Study Committee 171 

Highway Department 172 

Conservation Commission 173 

Land Conservation Trust 174 

Landscape Committee 175 

Cemetery Commissioners 176 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Library Trustees 177 

Recreation Committee 183 

Scholarship Fund Committee 188 

Bemis Fund Trustees 190 

DeCordova Museum 191 

Elementary Schools 198 

Regional High School 229 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 254 

Valuation List 258 

Trust Funds 284 



Jveport 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



X^own of blncoln 



FOR THE YEAR 19 6 4 




LINCOLN. MASSACHUSETTS 



TOWN CALENDAR 

SELECTMEN — Every Monday of each month, 8:00 P.M., 

Town Hall, 259-8850 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — 'First Monday of each month, 

8:00 P. M. , Superintendent's Office, 
259-9400 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS -- First Tuesday of each month, 

8:00 P. M. , Town Hall, 259-8850 

WATER COMMISSIONERS -- Meetings by appointment 

BOARD OF HEALTH -- Meetings by appointment; call 

Dr. Gordon Donaldson, 259-8192 

BOARD OF APPEALS -- Meetings by appointment; call 

Town Hall, 259-8850 

PLANNING BOARD -- Second Monday of each month, 

8:00 P. M. , Town Hall, 259-8850 

Population -- 3,917 (1960 census) 

Town area — 14.56 square miles 

1964 Tax Rate -- $77 per $1,000 valuation 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING — First Monday in March after 

the fifteenth - March 22, 1965 

ANNUAL ELECTION FOR TOWN OFFICERS -- Saturday 

following Town Meeting - March 27, 1965 

Qualifications for Registration - Twelve months 

continuous residence in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts prior to 
March 22, 1965, and six months con- 
tinuous residence in the Town of 
Lincoln prior to March 22, 1965 

Town Offices -- Open Monday through Friday 8:30 

A. M. to 5 P. M. Closed on Saturdays 




General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



During 1964, the Board developed and 
carried out policies set forth in the 1963 re- 
port . 

Town Boards, elected and appointed, main- 
tain full policy-making prerogatives. Frequent 
meetings with other Boards and Committees have 
made it possible for the Selectmen to understand, 
participate in and help develop the total activi- 
ty of Town Government. 

The land use and financial survey is near- 
ing completion and a summary outline is contained 
in this report. The final report will be com- 
pleted and distributed to the Town in April. 
This Board feels that the survey will be of major 
help in considering and developing Town policies 
in this and subsequent years. 

Because time must be allowed for which un- 
derstanding of this study is basic to making de- 
cisions on land acquisitions, conservation, recre- 
ation, and similar policies, no principal land 
acquisitions are proposed for the current annual 
meeting. Should such action appear desirable, 
recommendations will be presented to the Town in 
the Spring after there has been time for all to 
receive and understand the survey. 

The full-time position of Executive Secre- 
tary has been well filled and developed by Warren 
Flint, who was appointed immediately following 
the Town Meeting in March 1964. The authorizing 
statute provides for one who will help administer 
the affairs of the Town. We feel that work 
during this last year has clearly demonstrated 
that the efficiency of Town services has increased 
and their costs have been reduced through full- 
time effort in this job. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



The principal impact of this Board during 
1964 has been, and will continue to be, a joint 
and cooperative approach to Town work and Town 
problems through frequent consultation with Town 
Boards and the ability to coordinate Town per- 
sonnel and equipment through the Executive Secre- 
tary. An important example is cooperation by 
the Water Board with us in a joint approach. 
Joint use of men and equipment has made it possi- 
ble to complete necessary flushing and testing of 
all hydrants. We feel that continuing coopera- 
tion will result in increasing efficiencies and 
a sound water and hydrant system, 

Constructive meetings with the Board of 
Assessors are resulting in a mutual understanding 
of assessing problems, which affect the Town so 
vitally. Both Boards and the Finance Committee 
are joining in an Annual Town Meeting article, 
which we all feel should give added strength to 
the Board of Assessors in carrying out their in- 
tent of equal and equitable assessment. 

Similarly, meetings with the Board of 
Health have resulted in joint decision to pre- 
sent to the Town for consideration a need for 
Town financial support of Walden Clinic. Pierce 
Fund money helped start the Clinic in 1960 when 
the Board of Health felt it important to help im- 
plement a new venture. The Clinic is now estab- 
lished and growing and of importance to the Town 
as a whole. We feel it important that Pierce 
Fund monies be used to "seed" other projects and 
that the Town now support this worthwhile project 
directly. 

Continued close association with the Plan- 
ning Board and the Finance Committee on financial 
and other Town policies has resulted, as an ex- 
ample, in the completed land use and financial 
survey . 

We believe that the continual exchange of 
thoughts among strong, independent Boards and 
Committees results in a most constructive inter- 
dependence of Town Boards. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



ECONOMY 



Overall Town ex 
somewhat as has been 
Our emphasis is on ta 
ble to save money by 
for each dollar spent 
increasingly proficie 
of activity. Some e 
suits are as follows: 



The E 
been ac t i ve 
par tmen t s : 
1 ine paint i 
plies, and 
t r ac t , 1 owe 
before wer e 
was frequen 
by combinin 
Board of He 
and the Wat 
costs were 
ma ins . 



xecut i ve S 
as a c oor 

By b idd in 
ng, oil an 
road hot t 
r un it pr i 

ob t a ined . 
tl y d one f 
g r eque s t s 
al th , the 
er Comm is s 
r educed f o 



penditures have increased 
the case in other years, 
king steps wherever possi- 
obtaining the maximum value 
. We feel we are becoming 
nt in this area 
xampl es of r e- 



ecr et ar y has 
d i nat or of d e- 
g all wh i t e - 
d gasoline sup- 
op in one c on- 
ce s than ever 

Engineering 
or less money 

from t he 
Planning Board 
i oner s . Un i t 
r new water 




The Parks Department under 
Albert Brooks saved money and increased efficiency 
by planting around the new school and by doing yeo 
man work in assisting the Water Department in the 
program of flushing hydrants. 



FIRE 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



In July 1964, the second full-time fireman, 
recommended a year ago, was added. The small 
forest-fire truck, recommended a year ago, was 
also obtained, as well as full-time radio contact 
with Concord and Weston. The forest-fire truck 
has already been used for a number of brush fires, 
one of which was in an area which could only be 
reached by the small truck. We feel that these 
additions strengthen the overall fire protection 
in the Town. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Water supply was improved significantly by 
two steps. Mains were extended down Sandy Pond 
Road and Tower Road for the first extension of hy- 
drants in a number of years. The Water Board, 
as part of their improvement of service, cleaned 
the mains of the Town, sharply increasing the 
pressure available at many spots. Late in the 
year, using all available Town forces, all hy- 
drants were tested, and seven were found in need 
of replacement or major repair. The testing pro- 
gram resulted in a complete census of hydrants 
connected and, as a consequence, the number for 
which the Town is billed by the Water Board in- 
creased from 233 to 293. The budget for 1965 is 
increased proportionately. Also in the budget is 
the money to add improved protection gear for 
the call firemen, primarily the addition of a com- 
plete set of helmets. 

Replacement of Engine No. 2 was considered 
but because the Town has three other pieces of ap- 
paratus in excellent condition, it was not felt 
necessary to replace this particular unit. It 
was inspected by outside consultants and included 
in the budget is $1,200 for replacement of the 
engine and overhaul of the pump to bring it up to 
standards recommended by the New England Fire In- 
surance Rating Association. 

During 1964, the number of call firemen was 
reduced approximately ten per cent by retirements 
and people moving away. Ten years ago, the Se- 
lectmen reported, "It must be recognized that the 
availability of call firemen is a constantly more 
troublesome problem". 

We particularly wish to pay tribute to 
Joseph Tracey who served the Town long and well. 
His death was a great loss to the Town. 



POLICE 

As indicated in the Report of Chief Algeo, 
significantly increased effort was placed on 
traffic control beginning in November. Over the 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



een a slow but relative- 
number of accidents re- 
eople injured. This in- 
d was definitely in pro- 
umber of vehicles on the 
electmen and Chief Algeo 
cement of traffic regula- 
to lessen the possibility 

Four man hours a day 
ctly to traffic enforce- 
random throughout the 

Our policy has been to 

written warnings for all 
ns stopped for the first 

Tickets will be issued 
11 second-time offenders, 
g the first two months, 

were very few second-time 
ders and we are hopeful 
this will continue to be 
ase. Prevention is our 
t . 

The Selectmen and the Pot 
ice Department have firmly es- 
tablished a "no-fix policy". 
We believe that traffic en- 
forcement is effective and better understood when 
all people are treated identically. We stand 
squarely behind the Chief and the Department in giv- 
ing no favors - no matter who is involved. 




Our experiment with a police dog has not yet 
proven itself and results with the dog will be 
watched carefully in 1965. We appreciate donation 
of the dog by the Grange and Mr. Harold Ogilvie f s 
paying for his feeding. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



The same level of activity and consequent ex- 
pense is expected to be maintained in 1965 as in 
1964. We are attempting to maintain our contacts 
with the State Office and do enough to keep in their 
good graces. During 1964, Deputy Chief of Police 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Maclnnis went to a school to learn to teach 
others how to control activities in an air-raid 
shelter when in use for that purpose. Buildings 
in the Town have been inspected for their ade- 
quacy as shelters and six spots were considered 
to be adequate. 



WAGE BOARD 

Three years ago the Finance Committee and 
this Board constituted a Wage Board. Experience 
indicated that an integrated Wage Board of three 
should be most effective. The Finance Committee 
and the School Committee agreed, and late in 1964 
a Board was constituted consisting of John Tew 
from the Finance Committee, Perry Culver from the 
School Committee, and Russell Haden from the Se- 
lectmen. This Wage Board has developed effective 

iy. 

This Board recognized early that there was 
a need for a consistent approach to wages in the 
Town instead of the somewhat expedient approach 
that had been used in times past. Lincoln, as 
a small town, cannot set a wage pattern and must 
follow whatever pattern exists. We also need to 
recognize that in today's motorized age it is 
relatively easy for our employees to secure posi- 
tions in other towns. The 701 Land-Use Survey 
has revealed that 82 per cent of Town employees 
live in other Towns. Consequently, the Board 
formulated the policy that wage increases in Lin- 
coln would be set by the average of the increases 
in our four most comparable neighboring towns, 
Weston, Wayland, Sudbury and Concord. The in- 
creases shown in the 1965 budget were developed 
using this approach. 

We also expect, during 1965, to set a proper 
salary range for each job in the Town, again 
based on comparing our jobs with those in the 
four towns mentioned above. Detailed job des- 
criptions are being prepared of their jobs and 
ours and from these we will evaluate our jobs in 
order to be sure that there are no inequities in 
our salary schedules. 



8 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



The Selectmen would like to acknowledge 
the great number of hours that many of its em- 
ployees put into their jobs. It would be im- 
possible to mention all of those who are giving 
extra effort to the Town in this way but Warren 
Flint, Elizabeth Causer, Ann Paddock, Elizabeth 
Snelling and William Davis are outstanding ex- 
amples. We appreciate the dedication of our 
staff . 

As the Town grows, an increasing load is 
placed upon our Town Clerk and Tax Collector, 
both positions being filled by William H. Davis. 
During the year, arrangements were worked out so 
that our Assistant Treasurer, Mrs. Paddock, could 
provide a significant number of hours in working 
with Mr . Davis. 



BUILDING CODE BY-LAW 

The Town's building code was first promul- 
gated in 1927 and last brought up to date in 1959. 
A complete overhaul was effected in 1964 by a 
Committee consisting of William Halsey, Chairman, 
with Harold Rosenwald, Douglas M. Burckett, and 
Stanley D. Porter. Much effort was put into 
preparing a code that is much more complete than 
the 1959 version. The reasons for doing this 
were both to increase the emphasis on performance 
of materials rather than on arbitrary requirements 
and also to prepare ahead for possible construct- 
ion of larger buildings permitted by the revised 
zoning of the Town, such as in the general resi- 
dence area. The Committee held several inform- 
al hearings to which contractors and architects 
were invited and every effort was made to make 
sure that all viewpoints were recognized. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

A contract for the exterior repair of the 
Town Hall was completed in 1964. The firm of 
A. Belanger and Sons did an excellent job for the 
Town . 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Landscaping of the new Brooks School was 
done by the Parks Department at minimum cost to 
the Town. We see the opportunity for still 
more activity in the future as the Town grows 
and as we are able to raise the standards of ap- 
pearance . 

After careful study of a recommendation of 
the Recreation Committee, the Selectmen allocated 
some money from the Pierce Fund for the con- 
struction of a skating pond near the Pierce House. 
This pond appears to be useful. 

With the death of Mrs. Pierce in June 1964, 
the decision is now thrust upon the Town of what 
to do with the Pierce House. The Fence Viewer 
was very cooperative in publicizing the desire 
of the Selectmen to receive the thoughts of the 
townspeople on potential uses for the house. In 
addition, there was a large attendance at the 
tea, on January 10, 1965, at which people showed 
a great deal of interest in exploring the building 
thor oughl y . 

From all the suggestions which have been 
turned in to date, there appear to be three major 
proposals. The first is that in some way the 
building should be used for the elder citizens in 
the Town either as a place to live or as a com- 
munity center for them alone. A number of the 
suggestion sheets turned in at the tea, after 
people had had a chance to inspect the building 
itself, noted that the writers had changed their 
opinions and now withdrew this suggestion. The 
reason for this is that the building actually has 
few bedrooms for its size, thus holding only a 
small number of people, and because it would cost 
a disproportionate amount of money to modify the 
building to provide the bedrooms and fire escapes 
that would be necessary for this use. For these 
reasons, we doubt if this proposal is one that 
can be implemented. 

The second possibility concerns the use 
of the building for various activities for- chil- 
dren, either as a teen-age center, or for exist- 
ing activities such as Boy Scouts, etc. On the 



10 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



other hand, just as many people have written to 
say that such a use for the Pierce House should 
not be considered because of potential damage to 
the interior and because the building is not laid 
out well for such a purpose. Therefore, we feel 
that this also is probably not a practical pro- 
posal . 

The third major group of suggestions noted 
the desirability of preserving the building and 
the grounds. Many felt that adult use is con- 
sistent with preservation, that there is no real 
need for the building, but that it is possible to 
put it to worthwhile uses. For example, were 
two bathrooms installed, it would probably be 
practicable to give rooms to Town organizations, 
such as the Historical Society, the League of 
Women Voters, the Garden Club, or to use the 
building for Town offices, or for general Town 
gatherings. Because there was a great variety 
of suggestions in this group, careful considera- 
tion will be given to all of significance. 

Consonant with such a decision would be 
making available to a caretaker and his family 
three bedrooms on the second floor, including the 
wing. 



LANDSCAPE -BEAUTIFICAT ION COMMITTEE 

This Board appoints the Land scape-Beau t i f i - 
cation Committee and looks to it for suggestions 
and cooperation in improving the appearance of the 
Town and developing beauty spots. 

We feel that the work of this Committee 
can reasonably be enlarged, possibly to consider 
the designation of a Beaut if icat ion Day. The 
Selectmen would like to see worthwhile project- 
ions for action in various locations which should 
contribute to the overall appearance of the Town. 



HIGHWAYS 

For the last few years, the capital ex- 
penditure program for highways has largely com' 



11 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



pleted major construction on Town Highways. We 
believe that adequate maintenance will continue 
to be the major consideration during the coming 
years. It seems possible that full and adequate 
maintenance may defer major capital improvements 
f or some t ime . 

Route 126, from the Wayland line to Route 
117, is an important peripheral highway and must 
be improved to safe highway standards. Chapter 
90 Funds apply to such a project. We are in- 
deed mindful that no improvement in safety can 
take place without some lessening of the total 
beauty of our trees. We shall make every ef- 
fort to carry out what must be done in a way 
which will not overly injure the present beauti- 
ful avenue of trees. 



OBITER DICTA 

In addition to recommendations for action 
at the Town Meeting already referred to, we join 
with the Planning Board in urging that the Town 
become part of the Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council. We also are suggesting that the Town 
By-laws be amended to provide for a Celebration 
Committee and that a tabling motion require a 
two-thirds majority for passage. 



s 



We have particularly enjoyed the worth- 
while and harmonious relationships that give 
common purpose to the Air Force and the Town. 
The consideration given by the Air Force to 
Town needs, and its willingness to assist when- 
ever requested are warmly appreciated. 

We have met with a study committee of the 
Lincoln Historical Society to consider the wis- 
dom of establishing a historic district within 
the Town. Further joint study and communica- 
tion with those in any area which might be in- 
volved will develop during the coming year. 

We express deep appreciation to the League 
of Women Voters which has contributed greatly to 
our joint efforts to develop increasing communi- 



12 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



cation on Town matters with all the citizens. 
In addition to their worthwhile stated meetings, 
they have joined us in sponsoring and presenting 
many meetings throughout the Town at which a 
full and informal discussion of Articles to be 
presented at Town Meetings could take place. 
Such meetings provide true two-way communication 
which we hope is of benefit to those who attend. 
We know it is of benefit to the members of the 
Town Boards that participate in such meetings. 

Six similar meetings are planned for the 
first two weeks in March of this year, prior to 
the Annual Meeting. At these meetings, this 
Board will be joined by members of the Board of 
Health, the Board of Assessors, and the Water 
Board . 

Retiring from active service on elective 
Town Boards are Elmer H. Ziegler, who has com- 
pleted nine years of service on the Board of 
Assessors; C. DeWitt Smith, who for many years 
has given added strength to the School Committee; 
and John Carley, who is retiring as Chairman of 
the Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

We also recognize an anniversary of con- 
tinued service. Frederick B. Taylor was first 
appointed and then elected Town Treasurer 20 
years ago. His able approach to his responsi- 
bilities has not only developed an efficient ad- 
ministration but has benefited the Town finan- 
cially on many occasions. 



Harold E. Lawson 
Russell L. Haden, Jr 
Elliott V. Grabill 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



13 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Term Expires 



MODERATOR 



Charles Y. Wadsworth 1966 

TOWN CLERK 

William H. Davis 1965 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 1966 

Russell L. Haden, Jr. 1967 

Harold E. Lawson 1965 

ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1966 

Elmer H. Ziegler 1965 

Frank R. Stevens 1967 

TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 1965 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

William H. Davis 1965 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Perry J. Culver, M. D., Chairman 1967 

C. DeWitt Smith 1965 

Helen B. Gilfoy 1966 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Russell P. Mahan, Chairman 1967 

Alan McClennen 1965 

Stuart Avery 1966 

TREE WARDEN 

Albert S. Brooks 1965 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D., 

Chairman 1967 

Pierre M. Dreyfus, M. D. 1965 

Abigail Avery 1966 



14 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Exp ires 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



James Jagger 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Henry Morgan 



1965 
1966 
1967 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Robert A. Spence, Chairman 1966 

James DeNormandie 1965 

H. Arnold MacLean 1967 

PLANNING BOARD 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 1965 

Warren R. Dwyer 1967 

David L. Garrison 1968 

Robert L. Allen 1966 

Morton B. Braun 1969 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Albert S. Brooks 1965 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell 1967 

William T. King 1966 

Richard F. Schroeder 1965 

TRUSTEES OF BE MIS FUND 

Thomas Winship, Chairman 1967 

Paul Brooks 1966 

Margaret Wood (Resigned) 1965 

Elizabeth Harney (Appointed) 1965 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Life Trus tees 
Edwin M. Cole 

Roland C. Mackenzie (Resigned) 
Morley M. John (Appointed) 
Alice G. Meriam 

John Carley, Chairman (Elected) 1965 
Leo A. Palmer (Appointed by 

Selectmen) 1966 

Margaret Marsh (Appointed by 

joint School Committees) 1967 



15 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Expires 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

A Director s 

Victor A. Lutnicki, President 1968 

Paul W. Cook, Jr. 1967 

Dana W. Atchley, Jr. 1966 

John W. Lincoln (Resigned) 1965 

Francis Andrews (Appointed) 1965 

B Director s 
Eliot Hubbard (appointed by the 

Selectmen) 1966 
Janet Daniels (appointed by the 

School Committee) 19 65 
Stanley Heck (appointed by the 

Library Trustees) 1967 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Accountant and Clerk of Selectmen 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1965 

Executive Secretary 
Warren F. Flint 1967 

Director of Public Welfare 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1965 

Superintendent of Streets 
Raymond P. Maher 1965 

Chief of Police 
Leo J. Algeo 1965 

Deputy Chief of Police 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1965 

Fire Chief 
Leo J. Algeo 1965 



16 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Exp ires 



Police Officers 



Lawrence P. Hallett 1965 

Frank W. Gordon, Jr. 1965 

Michael McHugh 1965 

Richard J. Hallett 1965 

C ons t abl e s 

Leo J. Algeo 1965 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1965 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1965 

Dog Of f ic er s 

Leo J. Algeo 1965 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1965 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1965 

Sealer of Weights and Me a s u r e s 

Thomas W. Coan 1965 

Moth Superintendent 

Albert S. Brooks 1965 

Petroleum Inspector 

Thomas W. Coan 1965 

Forest Warden 

Leo J. Algeo 19 65 

Bu ilding Inspector 

William M. Dean 1965 

Wiring Inspector 

William M. Dean 1965 

Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Daniel J. Murphy 1965 

Director of Civil Defense 

Ernest L. Johnson 1965 

Assistant Directors of Civil Defense 

Eveleth R. Todd 1965 

Thomas W. Coan 1965 



17 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Term Exp ires 

Communications Officer 
DelbarP. Keily 1965 

Fence Viewers 
Richard J.Eaton 1965 

Guilbert Winchell 1965 

Surveyor of Cord Wood 
AlbertS. Brooks 1965 

Recreation Committee 

Nancy Butler 1965 

Mary Jane Butler 1965 

John W. Fisher 1965 

Walter I. Keyes 1965 
Charles E. Jennings , 1965 

Albert E. Nelson 1965 

Nancy K. Outten 1965 

Joan A. Ogden 1965 

Fred P. Walkey 1965 

Arlene B. Wirsig 1965 

J. Bertram Kessel, Chairman 1965 

Special Police 

Robert H. Booth Russell L. Haden, Jr. 

Floriy Campobasso Ernest L. Johnson 

Joseph Campobasso William T. King 

Edward C. Chisholm Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 

Claire Ciraso (Traffic) Harry B. Knowles, III 

E. John Ciraso Karl F. Lahnstein 

Harry Cook Harold E. Lawson 

John F. Cook Paul V. Moynihan 

Joseph Cotoni Mary Murphy (Matron) 

Lorraine Dean (Matron) D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 

William Dean Carl Smith 

James DeNormandie Sumner Smith 

William R. Doherty Alanson H. Sturgis 

Lloyd A. Douty Anne Sturgis (Traffic) 

Hazel Fedock (Matron) Mary Gilbert (Matron) 

Warren Flint Henry Warner 

John T. Gilbert William Whalen 
Elliott V. Grabill 



18 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Exp ires 

Veterans* Agent 

William B. Whalen 1965 

Landscape Committee 

Albert S. Brooks 1965 

Elizabeth H. Doherty 1965 

Richard J, Eaton 1965 

David L. Garrison 1965 

Mabel H. Todd 1965 

Max Mason, Chairman 1965 

Town C ounsel 



John W. White 1965 

Town Historian 

Margaret Flint 1965 

Conservation Commission 

John Quincy Adams 1965 

Paul Brooks 1965 

Mary Drury 1965 

John B. French 1965 

James DeNormandie 1965 

Robert Lemire 1965 

Hans Van Leer 1965 

Warren Dwyer , ex officio 1965 

Board of Appeals 

William N. Swift, Chairman 1966 

Alan McClennen 1967 

Henry B. Hoover 1968 

Hans Van Leer 1965 

James Jagger 1969 

Associate Members 

J. Lewis Cunningham 1966 

Betty L. Lang 1965 

Registrars of Voters 

D. Everett Sherman, Jr. 1966 

Henry Morgan 1965 

Manley B. Boyce 1967 

William H. Davis, ex officio 1965 



19 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Expires 

Building Code Board of Appeals 

Lawrence B. Anderson 1966 

Stephen W. Herthel 1965 

William A. Halsey 1967 

Associate Member 

Walter E. Belanger 1965 

Building Code Study Committee 

William A. Halsey 1965 

Douglas M. Burckett 1965 

Harold Rosenwald 1965 

Stanley D. Porter 1965 

Community Council at Hanscom Field 

Albert England, M. D. 1965 

William M. Rand, Jr. 1965 

Raymond W. Tunnell 1965 

Associate Members 

Frederic Eppling 1965 

Gregory S. Kolligian 1965 

Jury List, 19 64 

Name Residence 

Robert L. Allen Baker Bridge Road 

Harry Aptt Old Cambridge Pike 

John W. Barber Old Cambridge Pike 

John Barnard Old Concord Road 

Karl Bastress Huckleberry Hill 

Paul Brooks Silver Hill Road 

Charles B. Comstock Cambridge Turnpike 

Archer desCognets Weston Road 

Samuel Donnell Blueberry Lane 

James Duffy Baker Bridge Road 

Homer Eckhardt Laurel Drive 

Anthony Faunce Sandy Pond Road 

Roy Flewelling Blueberry Lane 

Ranulf Gras Laurel Drive 

Robert Gray Lincoln Road 

Donald Guy Tower Road 

George Haworth Giles Road 
Florence Ho 11 ingswor t h Twin Pond Lane 

Gerald Kir by Juniper Ridge 

R. Sherman Kingsbury Mackintosh Lane 



20 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Name 
John Kling 
Gregory Kolligian 
Richard Lang 
Mark Nairn an 
Leopold Peavy 
William Rand , Jr . 
Richar d Reece 
Arthur Rice 
Roland Robbins 
William Rodrick 
Catherine Rowe 
William Scanlan 
John Stevenson 
Vi ncen t Tar ky 
Lex Taylor 
Volta Torrey 
Karl Van Leer 



e s id ence 



R 

Farrar Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Winter Street 
Weston Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
L inc ol n Road 
Trapelo Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Old Cambridge Pike 
Morningside Lane 
Winter Street 
Old Cambridge Pike 
Weston Road 
Huckleberry Hill 
Beaver Pond Road 
Lincoln Road 
Conant Road 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 



Term Exp ires 



Assistant Treasurer 



Ann E. Paddock 



1965 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



Community Nurse 
Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 



1965 



Burial Agent 
William H. Davis 



1965 



Inspector of Animals 
George U. Browning, Jr. 



1965 



21 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Term Expires 

APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 

Permanent Building Committee 

Winthrop Walker 1965 

Eleanor Wilson 1966 

E. Karl Bastress 1967 

John Pike 1968 

Guilbert S. Winchell 1969 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

Finance Committee 

Ernest P. Neumann 1967 

Paul L. Norton, M. D. 1965 

Joseph A. Vitale 1966 

Richard B. Bailey 1966 

John B. Tew, Chairman 1965 

Long-Term Capital Requirements Committee 

Robert D. Donaldson, Jr. 1966 

Leo A. Palmer 1967 

Richard C. B. Clark 1965 

Memorial Day Committee 

Joseph J. Campobasso 1965 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1965 

Albert L. Fullerton 1965 

Ann B. Kingsbury 1965 

Morris R. Robinson 1965 

Fourth of July Committee 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1965 

E. Donlan Rooney 1965 

Thomas B. Adams 1965 

William B. Whalen 1965 

Annette E. Gras 19 65 



22 



TOWN CLERK 



William H. Davis 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of 
Town events and activities and issues licenses 
and certificates. His duties include recording 
the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, 
and notifying the Selectmen and other officers 
concerned of appropriations which have been voted 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln 
is kept at the Clerk* s office. Persons wishing 
to become voters in the Town should communicate 
with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 16, 1964 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meet- 
ing was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. 
Charles Y. Wadsworth. The return of the Warrant 
was read and the invocation given. The Moderator 
then called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers) and, a quorum being present, the follow- 
ing business was transacted: 

Ar t i c 1 e 2 . To hear and act upon the reports 
of Town Officers, Committees, Commissioners and 
Trustee s . 

VOTED : That the reports of the Town 
Officers, Commissioners, Committees and Trustees, 
as printed in the Town Report, be accepted, and 
that the report of the School Needs Committee be 
accepted as an interim report, and that their un- 
expended appropriation be continued. 

Ar t i c 1 e 3 . To fix the salaries and compen- 
sation of the several elective officers of the 
Town and to determine whether any Department, 
Board, or Committee shall be authorized to employ 



23 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



for additional compensation any of its members 

and to fix additional compensation of such members. 

VOTED ; That the salaries of the elected 
officers of the Town for the current year be fixed 
at the following amounts each: 

Selectmen, each $ 100.00 

Treasurer 200.00 

Collector of Taxes 2,950.00 

Town Clerk 600.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 
Tree Warden 200.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Tree Warden be authorized to work for 
the Park Department at the rate of $2.85 per hour. 

Ar t i c 1 e 4 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to empower the Selectmen to appoint an 
Executive Secretary for a term of three years, un- 
der the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 41, 
Section 23A, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED: That the Board of Selectmen be 
and hereby are authorized and empowered to appoint 
an Executive Secretary for a term of three years, 
under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 41, 
Section 23A. 

Ar t i c 1 e 5 . To raise and appropriate money 
for the necessary and expedient purposes of the 
Town or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town adopt as separate 
appropriations the listed recommendations in the 
Schedule attached to the Report of the Finance 
Committee for 1963, printed on pages 4 to 11, in- 
clusive, of the Financial Section of the 1963 Town 
Report, except that the following final amounts 
shall be appropriated in substitution for the same 
numbered items in said Schedule: 

Item Final 

No. Title 

101 Expense 

502 Instruction 

504 Operation & Maintenance 

of plant 

900 Middlesex Co. Pension Fd. 



24 



Decrease 




Amount 


$ 100.00 


$ 


3 , 355 .00 


5 ,560.00 




452,115.00 


1 ,000 .00 




93,411,00 


1, 777.00 




13, 223.00 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



and that all the sums be raised by taxation ex- 
cept to the following extent: 

(a) As to items 1*5 , 40, 320, 321, 502, and 
520, respecting which said Schedule contains no- 
tations for the application of funds thereto from 
specific sources, funds from such sources shall 
be so appl ied ; 

(b) Items 950 to 956, inclusive, shall be 
taken from Water Department Receipts to the ex- 
tent available, and to the extent insufficient, 
shall be taken from Water Department Surplus. 

(c) And it is further voted that the sum of 
$2,696.46 in the Hartwell School Addition Building 
Fund be returned to Surplus. 

Ar t i c 1 e 6 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1965, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year, 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General 
Laws . 

VOTED : That the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
January 1, 1965, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year, in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Ar t i c 1 e 7 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 
to be added to the Stabilization Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 23 
of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $20,000 to be added to the Sta- 
bilization Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meeting 
on March 16, 1959. 



25 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Ar t ic 1 e 8 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 
to be added to the Stabilization Fund established 
pursuant to the vote of the Town under Article 23 
of the Annual Meeting on March 16, 1959, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $10,000 to be added to the Sta- 
bilization Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual Meet- 
ing on March 16, 1959. 

Ar t i c 1 e 9 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to conduct services on Memorial Day, 
the thirtieth of May, appoint a committee, raise 
and appropriate a sum of $250.00, or any other 
sum, or take any action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Moderator be authorized 
to appoint a committee of five to plan and carry 
out exercises on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of 
May next, and that the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $250.00 for the use of such committee 
in connection with the exercises. 

A r ticle 10. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to request the Trustees under the Will 
of Julian DeCordova to pay over to the DeCordova 
and Dana Museum and Park one hundred per cent 
(100%) of the B Trust net income for the year 1964, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town request the Trust- 
ees under the Will of Julian DeCordova to pay over 
to the DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park one hun- 
dred per cent (100%) of the B Trust net income 
for the year 1964. 

Ar ticle 11. To determine whether the Town 
will authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 
School Committee to continue its annual contract 
with U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate 
the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bed- 
ford, Massachusetts. 

VOTED : That the Town authorize the 
School Committee and the Board of Selectmen to con- 
tinue the annual contract with the U. S. Commission' 
er of Education to operate the elementary school at 



26 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



the L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Ar t i c 1 e 12. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,8 0.0 0, or any other sum, for the purchase of 
a highway 3/4 ton dump truck, to replace existing 
equipment, or take any other action relative there 
t o . 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appro- 

priate the sum of $5,800 for the purchase of a 3/4 
ton dump truck for the use of the Highway Depart- 
ment . 

Ar t i c 1 e 13. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000.00, or any other sum, to make necessary re- 
pairs to the outside of the Town Hall, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appro- 

priate the sum of $5,000 to make necessary repairs 
to the outside of the Town Hall. 

Ar t i c 1 e 14. To bring in their votes for 
any committees, commissioners, trustees, and other 
officers required by law to be elected by ballot 
or ot her wi se . 

VOTED: That Albert Brooks be elected 

Measurer of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Ar t i c 1 e 15. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to appropriate the sum of $4,900.00, or 
any other sum, for the purpose of purchasing a 
Forest Fire Truck, for the use of the Fire Depart- 
ment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appro- 

priate the sum of $4,900 for the purchase of a 
Forest Fire Truck for the use of the Fire Depart- 
ment . 

Ar t i c 1 e 16. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to appropriate the sum of $9,352.83 for 
the purpose of repairing Weston Road (from Silver 
Hill Road to the Weston line) under the provisions 
of Chapter 782 of the Acts of 1962, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the 



27 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



sum of $9,352.83 for the purpose of repairing. 
Weston Road (from Silver Hill Road to the Weston 
line), said sum to be taken from sums received 
from the Commonwealth under the provisions of 
Chapter 782 of the Acts of 1962. 

Ar ticle 17. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to appropriate the sum of $9,352.83 for 
the purpose of repairing Old Winter Street, also 
Winter Street (from Old Winter Street to Old Coun- 
ty Road) under the provisions of Chapter 822 of 
the Acts of 1963, or take any other action rela- 
t ive thereto , 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the 
sum of $9,352.83 for the purpose of repairing Old 
Winter Street, also Winter Street (from Old Winter 
Street to Old County Road), said sum to be taken 
from sums received from the Commonwealth under 
the provisions of Chapter 822 of the Acts of 1963. 

Ar ticle 18. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,500.00, or any other sum, for the purchase of 
a tractor for the use of the Highway Department, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appro- 

priate the sum of $5,500 for the purchase of a 
tractor and certain integral equipment for the 
use of the Highway Department. 

Art icle 19 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to celebrate Independence Day, the fourth 
of July, appoint a committee, raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000.00, or any other sum, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Moderator be authorized 

to appoint a committee of five to plan and carry 
out a celebration for Independence Day, the fourth 
of July, and that the Town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000 to be used by the Committee. 

Art icle 20 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,650.00, or some other sum, to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the 
vote of the Town under Article 23 of the 1959 An- 



28 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

f 



nual Town Meeting, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : That there be raised and appro- 

priated for addition to the Stabilization Fund es- 
tablished pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 23 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 16, 
1959, for long-range land acquisition, the sum of 
$4 , 650 . 

Art ic le 21 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,650.00, or some other sum, to be added to the 
Conservation Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 13 of the 1961 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action relative 
t hereto . 

VOTED : That there be raised and appro- 

priated the sum of $4,650 to be added to the Con- 
servation Fund established pursuant to the vote 
of the Town under Article 13 of the 1961 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Ar t ic le 22 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to acquire for conservation and recrea- 
tional purposes by eminent domain, purchase, or 
in any other way, from Joseph and Mira C. Garland, 
a certain parcel of land on Sandy Pond Road, shown 
as Lot 4 on a plan entitled "Division of Land in 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned by Joseph and Mira 
C. Garland", recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds in Book 9955, Page 511, 
said parcel having an area of 1.89 acres, more or 
less, reserving to Joseph and Mira C. Garland for 
their joint lives and life of the survivor the 
exclusive occupancy and use of said lot and the 
buildings thereon , and for such purposes to ex- 
pend from monies in the Conservation Fund estab- 
lished pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting, the 
sum of $4,000.00, or some other sum, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be author- 

ized and empowered in the name and on behalf of 
the Town to acquire in fee from Joseph and Mira 
C. Garland by purchase, eminent domain, or in any 
other manner, for conservation and recreational 



29 






GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



purposes, a certain parcel of land on Sandy Pond 
Road, shown as Lot 4 on a plan entitled "Division 
of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, owned by Joseph 
and Mira C. Garland", recorded with Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds in Book 9955, 
Page 511, said parcel having an area of 1.89 acres, 
more or less, reserving to Joseph and Mira C. Gar- 
land for their joint lives and life of the sur- 
vivor the exclusive occupancy and use of said lot 
and the buildings thereon, and for such purposes 
to expend from monies in the Conservation Fund 
established pursuant to the vote of the Town under 
Article 13 of the 1961 Annual Town Meeting the sum 
of $4 , 000 .00 . 

Ar t i c 1 e 2 3. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to amend section VI-B of its Zoning By- 
Law by adding a new paragraph 8 (Exception for 
Cluster Development in an R-l Single Residence 
District) thereto, as proposed in a notice now on 
file with the Town Clerk, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Lincoln, as adopted December 13, 1960, ap- 
proved by the Attorney General January 27, 1961, 
and effective February 7, 1961, and thereafter 
amended, be further amended by adding thereto a 
new subsection (8) to Section VI-B (Development 
Regulations - Area, Frontage and Yard Requirements) 
as follows : 

(8) Exception for Cluster Development in an 
R-l Single Residence District. 

(a) For the purpose of promoting the 
more efficient use of land in harmony with 
its natural features and v/ith the general 
intent of the Zoning By-Law, and to protect 
and promote the health, safety, convenience 
and general welfare of the inhabitants of the 
Town, an owner or owners of a tract of land 
situated within the R-l Single Residence Dis- 
trict, or a duly authorized agent thereof, 
may, in connection with the submission of a 
subdivision plan for Planning Board approval 
under the Subdivision Control Law or, ±f no 
such approval is required, after consultation 
with the Planning Board, make application to 



30 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



the Board of Appeals for a special permit 
excepting his plan from the lot area and 
frontage requirements of sub-paragraphs B-l 
through B-5 of this Section VI. 

(b) After notice and public hearing, 
and after due consideration of the report and 
recommendations of the Planning Board (see 
sub-paragraph (d) below), the Board of Ap- 
peals may grant such a permit provided that: 

(1) It finds that the proposed 
plan is in harmony with the purpose and in- 
tent of this By-Law and that it will promote 
the purposes of this section; 

(2) The area of the tract of land 
to be subdivided is not less than ten (10) 
acres ; 

(3) The number of lots on the 
plan does not exceed the number of lots upon 
which dwellings could be constructed on the 
total land area of the tract which is usable 
for residential construction without refer- 
ence to this sub-section (8), under the appli' 
cable laws of the Town and the Commonwealth, 
as determined by the Planning Board in its 
report made pursuant to paragraph (d) below; 

(4) Each lot shall contain not 
less than 40,000 square feet; 

(5) Each lot shall have a minimum 
frontage of eighty (80) feet on a public or 
private way, except that a lot on the turn- 
ing circle of a dead end street may have a 
frontage of not less than fifty (50) feet, 
provided that the shortest distance between 
side lot lines shall be at least eighty (80) 
feet at every point more than forty (40) feet 
from the street line to the dwelling or main 
non-residential structure; 

(6) The minimum front yard shall 
be forty (40) feet; 

(7) The minimum side and rear 
yards shall be thirty (30) feet; 

(8) The minimum width of the lot 
at the building shall be one hundred sixty 
(160) feet; 

(9) Provision shall be made so 
that at least 20% of the land area of the 



31 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



tract, exclusive of land set aside for road 
area, shall be Open Land, and that the area 
of open land shall be such that when added 
to the total area of all lots smaller than 
80,000 square feet, the total area shall not 
be less than the number of such lots multi- 
plied by 80,000 square feet; 

(10) Provisions shall be made so 
that Open Land shall be owned: 

(a) by the Town; 

(b) by the Lincoln Land 
Conservation Trust; 

(c) jointly by the owners 
of the land ; 

(d) jointly by the owners 
of the land and the 
Town ; 

(e) by an association of the 
owners of the land, or 

(f ) in any other manner that 
may be approved by the 
Board of Appeals, 

provided that such ownership 
shall vest in the Town suffi- 
cient rights to enable it to 
enforce compliance with the 
restrictions imposed by the 
Board of Appeals as condi- 
tions of its special permit; 
and 

(11) Provision shall be made so 
that Open Land shall be restricted to any one 
or more of the uses allowed in a C-Open-Space 
Conservation District by right or appeal. 

(c) The Board of Appeals may, in appro- 
priate cases, impose further restrictions upon 
the tract, or parts thereof, as a condition 

to granting the special permit. 

(d) In connection with an application 
for a special permit from the Board of Appeals 
under this section, the Planning Board shall 
submit, in writing, prior to the hearing, its 
recommendation and report to the Board of Ap- 
peals. The Planning Board may supplement its 

32 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



report after the hearing. The report of the 
Planning Board shall include as a minimum: 

(1) A determination of the area 
of the tract "usable for residential con- 
struction" ; 

(2) A determination of the number 
of lots upon which dwellings could be con- 
structed without regard to this section; 

(3) A general description of the 
neighborhood in which the tract lies and the 
effect of the plan on the area; 

(4) The relation of the plan to 
the Long Range Plan of the Town; 

(5) The extent to which the plan 
is designed to take advantage of the natural 
terrain of the tract; 

(6) The extent to which the pro- 
posed Open Land is of a size and shape and 
has adequate access to benefit the Town; 

(7) The Planning Board's opinion 
as to the overall design of the plan; 

(8) The Planning Board's recom- 
mendations as to the advisability of granting 
the special permit, and as to any restrict- 
ions which should be imposed upon the tract 
as a condition of such permit. 

The Board of Appeals shall give due consider- 
ation to the report of the Planning Board and, 
where its decision differs from the recommen- 
dations of the Planning Board, shall state the 
reasons therefor in writing. 

(e) For the purpose of this section, 
land "usable for residential construction" 
shall be defined as land found by the Plan- 
ning Board and Board of Health, at the time 
of the application, assuming compliance with 
the Zoning By-Law, to be suitable for the 
construction thereon of residential dwelling 
units under the rules and regulations of the 
Town of Lincoln and the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts relating thereto. 

(f) Any condition set forth herein re- 
quiring a minimum lot area or frontage shall 
not be construed as purporting to limit the 



33 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



right of the Board of Appeals to grant a 
variance therefrom as permitted by law. 

Ar t icl e 24. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to amend paragraphs VI- D-2, VI - D-3, 
and X - B-5 of the Zoning By-Law as proposed in 
a notice now on file with the Town Clerk, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED; That the Zoning By-Law of the 

Town of Lincoln, as adopted December 13, 1960, ap- 
proved by the Attorney General January 27, 1961, 
and effective February 7, 1961, and thereafter 
amended, be further amended by adding the words 
"and within the same zoning district" at the end 
of subparagraph (2), Section VI-D (Off-Street 
Parking and Loading Areas), so that the paragraph 
will read as follows: 

"(2) Required off-street parking and load- 
ing spaces shall be located on the same lot as the 
building or use they are intended to serve, or, in 
the case of parking spaces, on other premises with' 
in two hundred (200) feet of such lot, and within 
the same zoning district", 

and further to substitute the word "thereafter" 
for the word "hereafter" in subparagraph (3), Sec- 
tion VI-D (Off-Street Parking and Loading Areas), 
so that the paragraph will read as follows: 

"(3) Required off-street parking and load- 
ing spaces shall not thereafter be reduced nor any 
loading space counted as or substituted for a park- 
ing space" , 

and further to substitute "Section 4" for "Section 
20" in subparagraph (5) of Section X-B (Board of 
Appeals - Powers of the Board), so that the para- 
graph will read as follows: 

"(5) In carrying out the provisions of 
paragraphs 3 and 4 above, the Board may impose, as 
a condition of its decision, such restrictions as 
to manner and duration of use as will in its opin- 
ion safeguard the legitimate use of the property 
in the neighborhood and the health and safety of 
the public, and conform to the intent and purpose 
of this by-law as provided in Section 4 of Chapter 
40A of the General Laws, and such restrictions to 
be stated in writing by the Board and made a part 
of the permit." 



34 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Article 25, To determine whether the Town 

j- # 

will vote to acquire for conservation and recrea- 
tional purposes by eminent domain, purchase, or in 
any other way, from Anthony J. DiPerna, et al , a 
certain parcel of land on the northeast side of the 
Concord Turnpike, containing 50 acres more or less, 
and to raise and appropriate a sum of money there- 
for from taxation, borrowing, under authority of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (5), 
the Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the 
vote of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual 
Meeting on March 16, 1959, available funds, or any 
combination thereof, or take any other action rel- 
ative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and here- 

by are authorized and empowered in the name and 
on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee by eminent 
domain, purchase, or any other way, for recrea- 
tional and c onser vat i onal purposes, a certain par- 
cel of land in Lincoln on the northeast side of 
the Concord Turnpike, containing approximately 
46 acres, as shown on plan entitled "Plan of Land 
in Lincoln, Mass., owned by Anthony J. DiPerna, et 
al" , dated March 16, 1964, Cleverdon, Varney & 
Pike, Consulting Engineers, to be recorded with the 
Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $43,500 therefor, 
and that to meet said appropriation the sum of 
$20,000 be and hereby is appropriated from the 
Stabilization Fund established pursuant to the 
vote of the Town under Article 23 of the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 16, 1959, and that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be 
and hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of 
$23,500 under the provisions of Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 7, Clause (3), of the General Laws, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable 
in accordance with said Chapter 44, so that the 
whole loan will be paid in not more than twenty 
years from the date of issue of the first bond or 
note; and that the Selectmen be and hereby are 
authorized to make application to the U. S. Hous- 
ing and Home Finance Agency, under Title VII of 
the Housing Act of 1961, for a grant to acquire 
open space land, and to execute such other docu- 
ments as may be necessary to obtain such a grant. 



35 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



A-fc 11:40 P. M. the Meeting was adjourned 
until Tuesday, March 17, 1964, at 7:30 P. M. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL MEETING 
March 17, 1964 

The meeting v/as called to order by the Mod- 
erator, Mr. Charles Y. Wadsworth, at 7:35 P. M. 
and the following business was transacted: 

Ar ticle 26. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,000.00, or any other sum, for the use of the 
Planning Board in obtaining options for the pur- 
chase of land, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 

Ar ticle 27. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to accept the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 42G, H and I, concerning 
special assessments to meet the cost of laying 
water pipes, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED: To lay on the table. (Yes, 
9 7; No , 87.) 

Art icle 28 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to extend the water main on Sandy Pond 
Road to the Concord line and construct a water 
main on Fox Run; to establish a special assess- 
ment against abutters on said roads under the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
42G; and to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
therefor from taxation, borrowing available funds, 
or any combination thereof, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over. (Unanimously.) 

Ar ticle 29. To determine whether the Town 
will accept a gift of $9,524.00 from John E. 
Moore to defray a portion of the cost of extending 
the water main on Sandy Pond Road, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To pass over. (Unanimously.) 



36 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Art icle 30, To determine whether the Town 
will raise and appropriate the sum of $6,942.00 
for the purpose of discharging the lien to be 
imposed upon land owned by the Town as a result of 
the assessment voted under Article 28, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; To pass over. (Unanimously.) 

Ar t ic le 31 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to instruct the Water Board to conduct 
a pipe cleaning program, to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $15,000.00, or any other sum, there- 
for, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town instruct the 

Water Board to conduct a pipe cleaning program, 
and to raise and appropriate the sum of $15,000 
for this purpose, said sum to be taken from Water 
Department Surplus. 

Art icle 32 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to instruct the Water Board to replace 
approximately 2000 feet of existing 4" main on 
Old Winter Street with a 6" main with appropriate 
fittings, to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000 therefor, and determine whether the money 
shall be provided for by borrowing under author- 
ity of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, 
Clause (5), or take any other action relative 
ther eto . 

VOTED : That the Water Board be and 

hereby is instructed to replace approximately 
2000 feet of existing 4" main on Old Winter 
Street with an 8" main with appropriate fittings, 
and that the sum of $20,000 is hereby appropriated 
therefor, and that to meet said appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
be and hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of 
$20,000, under the provisions of Chapter 44, 
Section 8, Clause (5), of the General Laws, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, 
payable in accordance with said Chapter 44, so 
that the whole loan shall be paid in not more 
than fifteen years from the date of issue of the 
first bond or note. 

Art icle 33 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to authorize the Water Board to pur- 



37 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



chase a 1964 4-wheel drive truck, to replace 
existing equipment, and to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $3,000.00, or any other sum therefor, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over. (Unanimously.) 

Ar ticle 34. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to instruct the Water Board to replace 
approximately 3000 feet of 6" main on South 
Great Road, from Lincoln Road to Concord Road, 
with 10" cement asbestos pipe with appropriate 
fittings, to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$30,000.00 therefor, and determine whether the 
money shall be provided for by borrowing under 
authority of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, 
Clause (5), or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED : That the Water Board be and 

hereby is instructed to replace approximately 
3000 feet of existing 6" main on South Great Road, 
from Lincoln Road to Concord Road, with 10" 
cement asbestos pipe with appropriate fittings, 
and that the sum of $30,000 is hereby appropriated 
therefor, and that to meet said appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be 
and hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of 
$30,000 under the provisions of Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 8, Clause (5) of the General Laws, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, pay- 
able in accordance with said Chapter 44, so that 
the whole loan shall be paid in not more than 
15 years from the date of issue of the first bond 
or note. 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 21, 19 64 

In accordance with Article 1 of the -Warrant, 
the Polls were declared open at 8 o'clock A. M. 
by Mr. Warren Flint; at 11:00 A. M. Mr. Elliott 
V. Grabill assumed the duties of Warden; at 2 P.M. 
Mr. Warren Flint again assumed the duties; and at 



38 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



5 P. M. Mr. Elliott V. Grabill again acted as 
Warden until the close of the Polls at 7:00 P. M. 

The total number of votes cast was 1362, with the 
following results: 

Town Clerk (1 year) William H. Davis 1308 

Blanks 54 

Selectman (1 year) Edith M. Henderson 6 39 

Harold E. Lawson 720 

Blanks 3 

Selectman (3 years) Russell L. Haden, Jr. 1192 

Scatter ing 8 

Blanks 162 

Assessor (3 years) Frank R. Stevens 1180 

Scatter ing 1 

Blanks 181 

Treasurer (1 year) Frederick B. Taylor 1214 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 147 

School Committee Perry J. Culver 1199 

(3 years) Scattering 1 

Blanks 162 

Regional District Henry M. Morgan 1181 

School Committee Blanks 181 
( 3 year s ) 

Water Commissioner Russell P. Mahan 1205 

(3 years) Scattering 3 

Blanks 154 

Tree Warden (1 year) Albert S. Brooks 1249 

Scatter ing 4 

Blanks 109 

Board of Health Gordon A. Donaldson 1266 

(3 years) Blanks 96 

Cemetery Commissioner H. Arnold MacLean 1208 

(3 years) Blanks 154 



39 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Planning Board 
( 5 years ) 



Planning Board 
( 2 year s ) 



Commissioner of 
Trust Funds 
( 3 year s ) 

Trustee of Bemis 
Fund ( 3 year s ) 



Director of 
DeCordova & Dana 
Museum (4 years) 



Morton B. Braun 
Blanks 



Robert L. Allen 
Blanks 



Clement C. Sawtell 
Blanks 



Thomas Winship 
Blanks 



Victor A. Lutnicki 
Blanks 



1153 
209 



1166 
196 



1196 
166 



1201 
161 



1177 
185 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
April 15, 19 64 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meet- 
ing was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. 
Charles Y. Wadsworth, at 7:30 P. M. The return 
of the Warrant was read, the invocation offered, 
and a quorum being present, the following business 
was transacted: 

Ar t i c 1 e 1 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to extend the water main on Sandy Pond 
Road to the Concord line and construct a water 
main on Fox Run, and to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $60,000, or any other sum, therefor, by 
borrowing under authority of General Laws, Chapter 
44, for a period not to exceed ten years, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Board of Water Com- 

missioners be and hereby is authorized to extend 
the eight (8) inch water main on Sandy Pond Road 
to the Concord line, and to install an eight (8) 
inch water main on Fox Run, that the sum of 
$60,000 is hereby appropriated therefor, and that 
to meet said appropriation the Treasurer, with the 



40 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is auth- 
orized to borrow under the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, for a period not exceeding ten 
years the sum of $6 0,000, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor, payable in accordance 
with said Chapter 44, so that the whole loan shall 
be paid in not more than ten years from the date of 
issue of the first bond or note. 

Ar t ic 1 e 2 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to purchase from the Boston and Ma i n e 
Railroad for off-street parking purposes 6900 
square feet of land located on either side of the 
railroad right-of-way, between the present and pro- 
posed Lincoln Road, to raise anci appropriate the 
sum of $2,000, or any other sum, therefor, or take 
any other action relative thereto, 

VOTED : That the Selectmen be and here- 

by are authorized to purchase from the Boston and 
Maine Railroad for off-street parking purposes 
about 690 square feet of land located on either 
side of the railroad right-of-way, between the pre- 
sent and proposed Lincoln Road, as shown on plan of 
land entitled "10-23-63. Boston and Maine Rail- 
road. Map 16, Terminal Div., Main Line, Vicinity 
of Lincoln, Mass." Office of Chief Engineer - and 
that the sum of $2,000 is hereby appropriated 
therefor, said sum to be taken from free cash. 

The Moderator called attention to a proclama- 
tion from the Governor re "Litter Bugs". On 
motion duly seconded, it was then voted to adjourn 
at 10:15 P. M. 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
April 28, 1964 

Pu rsuant to a Warrant duly served, the polls 
were opened at 4 P. M. for the purpose of bringing 
in votes to the primary officers for the following 
offices : 



41 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



58 Delegates at Large to the National 
Convention of the Democratic Party; 

43 Alternate Delegates at Large to the 
National Convention of the Democratic Party; 

10 Delegates at Large to the National 
Convention of the Republican Party; 

10 Alternate Delegates at Large to the 
National Convention of the Republican Party; 

4 District Delegates to the National Con- 
vention of the Democratic Party - 5th Con- 
gressional District; 

2 Alternate Delegates to the National Con- 
vention of the Democratic Party - 5th Con- 
gressional District; 

2 District Delegates to the National Con- 
vention of the Republican Party - 5th Con- 
gressional District; 

2 Alternate District Delegates to the 
National Convention of the Republican Party 
5th Congressional District; 

District members of State Committee (One man 
and one woman for each Political Party for 
the 5th Middlesex District; 

35 members of the Democratic Town Committee; 

35 members of the Republican Town Committee, 

Presidential Preference. 

The polls were closed at 7:30 P. M. with the 
following results: 

Delegates (not grouped) Democrat ic 

John F. Albano 27 

Ruth M. Batson 30 

John S. Begley 28 



42 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



J. William Belanger 29 

Francis X. Bellotti 44 

Thomas J. Buckley 43 

William F. Buckley 35 

James A. Burke 35 

John S. Burke 30 

Garrett H. Byrne 34 

Robert V. Cauchera 28 

Bernard Cohen 31 

John F. Collins 44 

John W. Costello 32 

James J. Craven, Jr. 32 

John F. X. Davelon 29 

Harry Delia Russo 28 

John F. Dias 26 

Gerald F. Doherty 40 

John Thomas Driscoll 41 

William R. Driscoll 30 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick 36 

Mary L, Fonseca 28 

A. Frank Foster 30 

Foster Furcolo 38 

Edward P. Gilgun 31 

William Hartigan 27 

James W. Hennigan 29 

John B. Hynes 47 

Walter J. Kelliher 27 

George V. Kenneally 29 

Edward M. Kennedy 71 

Robert Francis Kennedy 57 

Daniel M. Keyes, Jr. 30 

Ida R. Lyons 27 

Torbert MacDonald 46 

Timothy A. Mantalos 2 6 

Norman Mason 25 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 62 

John W. McCormack 43 

Patrick J. McDonough 31 

Nicholas P. Morrissey 26 

Daniel F. O'Brien 33 

Thomas P. (VNeill, Jr. 39 

Endicott Peabody 87 

Francis G. Poitrast 28 

Charles W. Ryan, Jr. 30 

Benjamin A. Smith 4 3 

Edward J. Sullivan 31 



43 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Sherwood J. Tarlow 27 

Balcom S. Taylor 23 

Betty Taymoor 41 

John F. Thompson 25 

James A. Williams 29 

Kevin H. White 62 

Thomas J. White 31 

Scattering 24 

Alternate Delegates at Large (Not Grouped) 

Samuel H. Beer 54 

Margaret M. Breen 29 

William F. Brewin 24 

Thomas P. Broderick 24 

James F. Burke 24 

Joseph C. Casdin 22 

Charles N. Collatos 22 

Joseph A. DeGuglielmo 24 

Henry C. Donnelly 23 

Donald J. Dowd 23 

Rubin Epstein 25 

John T. Farrell, Jr. 24 

Joseph F. Feeney 22 

William J. Foley, Jr. 27 

Charles J. Hamilton 23 

John E. Harrington, Jr. 29 

Charles V. Hogan 22 

Lester S. Hyman 26 

Carl R. Johnson, Jr. 21 

Frank H. Kelleher 24 

Edward King 20 

Philip Kramer 22 

Edward Krock 23 

Laurence R. Laughlin 27 

James P. Loughlin 21 

Edward C. Maher 23 

Vincent Mannering 20 

Francis V. Matera 22 

James R. Mclntyre 22 

Denis L. McKenna 25 

Paul C. Menton 38 
Dace J. Moore . 22 

Edward S. Moss 22 

Bernard T. Moynihan 24 

Paul V. Mullaney 22 

George F. O'Meara, Jr. 22 



44 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



James R. Purdy 21 

Robert H. Quinn 21 

Earl J. Riley 21 

Anthony M. Scibelli 22 

Bernard Solomon 28 

Daniel M. Walsh, Jr. 26 

Albert H. Zabriskie 24 

District Delegates and Alternate District Dele- 
gates to Democratic National Convention - 5th 
District 

Delegates Group John Joseph Buckley 53 

Cornelius T. Kiernan 53 

Al ter nate 

Delegates James J. Long 50 

Richard K. Donahue 46 

State Committee - 5th Middlesex District (Vote for 
1 man ) 

Paul C. Men ton 7 2 

Frank L. Furlong 2 

Timothy G. Hall 9 

State Committee - 5th Middlesex District (Vote for 
1 woman) 

Edith B. Bonica 9 

Dolores L. Mitchell 56 

Alice D. Sullivan 13 

Town Committee - Town of Lincoln (35) 

E. Donlan Rooney 75 

Helen M. Dougherty 70 

Allan R. Dougherty 71 

Henry M. Morgan 79 

Robert C. Wood 80 

Robert D. Gordon 69 

Margaret M. Algeo 73 

Barbara M. O'Brien 74 

Gerald L. Kirby 67 

Robert M. Malloy 73 

Ethan A. Murphy 68 

Peggy P. Elliott 78 



45 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



James F. Rice, Jr. 66 

James J. Finnerty 70 

Matthew N. Sherman 65 

Anne P. Priest 8 

Armand E. Ferro 67 

Manley B. Boyce 71 

Edward J. Chisholm 73 

Frank R. Stevens 74 

Alvin Levin 76 

J. Richard Myles 69 

Harold Rosenwald 67 

Ettore P. Venier 66 
Albert C. England, Jr. 72 

Jean Wood Preston 76 

Nancy E. Hall 73 

Elizabeth C. Winship 76 

Roger S. Walen 72 

Virginia L. Senders 75 

Thomas D. Ward 73 

Oliver G. Selfridge 72 

Alfred C. Holland 73 

Joseph Mannarino 64 

Eleanor A. Brennan 68 



Pr esidential Pr eference : 



Johnson 
E. Kennedy 
R. Kennedy 
Stevenson 
Lodge 
Wallace 



62 
1 
5 
4 
2 
1 



Delegates - Group 1 



Republ ican 



Leverett Saltonstall 

Edward W. Brooke 

Joseph William Martin, Jr 

John A. Volpe 

Richard F. Treadway 

Mary R. Wheeler 

Georgia E. Ireland 

Christian A. Herter 

Bruce Crane 

George C. Lodge 



193 
161 
141 
151 
137 
134 
132 
159 
137 
158 



46 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Alternate Delegates 

Philip A. Graham 183 

Elmer C. Nelson 121 

Hastings Keith 136 

Philip K. Allen 127 

Margaret M. Heckler 136 

Russell G. Simpson 135 

James E. Henderson 134 

Irene K. Thresher 136 

Sidney Q. Curtis 135 

Richard E, Mastrangelo 133 

Delegates - Group 2 

Michael Robbins 61 

Jack E. Moles worth 5 6 

Paul J. Kelley 53 

Bernice L. Beckwith 51 

Raymond F. Friesecke 50 

Daniel J. Carmen 54 

J. Laurence McCarty 51 

Shepard A. Spunt 52 

Elliott K. Slade, Jr. 51 

Marshall G. Sade 50 

Alternate Delegates 

Gerald A. Giblin 57 

Joseph Alan MacKay 5 

Raymond F. Walsh 49 

Robert J. Gilkie 48 

Dorothy E. Graham 52 

Sylvia G. Sanders 45 

Frederick J. Mahoney, Jr. 5 2 

Jack W. Wilson 52 

Thomas J. Barry 51 

Gerald G. Aransky 49 

District Delegates and Alternate District Dele- 
gates to Na tional Convention - 5th District 



Delegates - Group 1 



Vincent Hockmeyer 83 

Cynthia L. Barone 69 



47 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Alternate Delegates 



Paul H. Provandie 77 

Gilbert M. Lothrop 70 



Delegates - Group 2 



Harrison Chadwick 154 

John M. Eaton 127 

Alternate Delegates 

Helen S. Carstensen 137 

Dean K. Webster 115 

State Committee - 5th Middlesex District (Vote for 

one Man) 

Alexander Ellis, Jr. 179 

John A. Maclnnes 4 

State Committee - 5th Middlesex District (Vote for 
one Woman) 

Sybil Danforth 126 

Diane Gaynor 33 

Scattering 1 

Town Committee - Town of Lincoln (Vote for not 
more than 35) 

Kenneth Bergen 46 

Anthony Faunce 42 

John Haartz 44 

Charles Wadsworth 46 

Richard Fleck 50 

Helen Swanson 41 

James DeNormandie 7 

Daniel Spaeth 6 

William Grinnell 4 

Spencer Martin 3 

Harold Lawson 2 

Ellen Cannon 2 

Everett Sherman 2 

John White 2 

Warren Dwyer 2 



48 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



William Davis 2 

Frederick Greene 2 

Sumner Smith 2 

Sareen Gerson 2 

Leopold Peavy 2 

John Tew 1 

Warren Fl int 1 

Thomas Adams 1 

William Rand 1 

Barbara Avery 1 

Charles Styron 1 

Gordon Donaldson 1 

Malcolm Donaldson 1 

Donald Gilfoy 1 

Bradford Cannon 1 

Elliott Grabill 1 

John Loud 1 

William DeFord 1 

Stanwood Bolton 1 

Louis Paddock 1 

John Abbott 1 

Charles Kindleberger 1 

George Wells 1 

Arthur Rice 1 

Robert Niles 1 

William Rand , Jr . 1 

Frederick Taylor 1 

Edith Henderson 1 

Gardner Jackson 1 



Pr esidential Pr eference : 



Lodge 154 

Goldwater 18 

Rockefeller 18 

Nixon 8 

Scranton 13 

Smith 3 

Javitz 2 

Johnson 1 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



49 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
August 3, 1964 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meet- 
ing was duly called to order by the Moderator, Mr. 
Charles Y. Wadsworth at 7:30 P. M. The return of 
the Warrant was read, the invocation was given, and 
a quorum being present, the following business was 
tr ansae t ed : 

Ar t i c 1 e 1 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to extend the water main on Tower Road to 
the entrance of Stonehedge and to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $17,000.00, or any other sum, 
therefor; and further to determine whether said sum 
shall, be provided by appropriation of the sum of 
$10,000.00 now held by the Town under the terms of 
an agreement between the Town and Wes-Lex Corpora- 
tion, authorized by the Annual Town Meeting held on 
March 19, 1962, and by borrowing $7,000.00 for a 
period not to exceed seven years under authority of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED; That the Water Board be and 

hereby is instructed to extend the water main on 
Tower Road to the entrance of Stonehedge and that 
the sum of $17,000 is hereby appropriated therefor; 
and that to meet said appropriation the sum of 
$10,000 now held by the Town under the terms of an 
agreement between the Town and Wes-Lex Corporation, 
authorized by vote of the Town at the Annual Town 
Meeting held on March 19, 1962, be and hereby is 
appropriated, and the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to 
borrow the sum of $7,000 under the provisions of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor, payable so that the 
whole loan shall be paid in not more than seven 
years from the date of issue of the first bond or 
no t e . 

On motion duly seconded it was voted to ad- 
journ at 8:23 P. M. 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



50 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 10, 1964 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls 
were open at 7:00 A. M. for the bringing in of votes 
to the Primary Officers for the nomination of can- 
didates for political parties for the offices listed 
below. The Polls were declared open by the 
Warden, Mr. D. Everett Sherman, Jr. At 11 A. M. 
Mr. Richard J. Eaton assumed the duties of Warden, 
and at 3 P. M. Mr. Sherman again assumed the duties 
and declared the Polls closed at 7:30 P. M. The 
following Ballot Clerks were duly sworn: Sadie J. 
Sherman, Elizabeth J. Snelling, Margaret Algeo and 
Catherine Coan. The total number of votes was 
1280, with the Democratic vote 227, and the Repub- 
lican vote 1053. The results of the balloting were 
as foil ows : 

Senator in Congress Republ i can 

Howard Whitmore, Jr. 826 

Blanks 227 

Governor 

John A. Volpe 864 

Scatter ing 1 

Blanks 188 

Lieutenant Governor 

Elliott L. Richardson 890 

Blanks 163 

Attorney General 

Edward W. Brooke 961 

Blanks 92 

Secretary 

Wallace B. Crawford 827 

Blanks 226 



51 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



l r easur er 

Robert C. Hahn 825 

Blanks 228 

Aud it or 

Elwynn J. Miller 825 

Scatter ing 1 

Blanks 227 

Congressman. 5th District 

F. Bradford Morse 908 

Blanks 145 

Councillor, 3rd District 

William F. Arrigal 36 

Perlie Dyar Chase 222 

George O'Rourke 619 

Blanks 176 

Senator. 5th Middlesex 

James DeNormandie 981 

Robert Toscano 17 

Eugene L. Tougas 7 

James Malcolm Whitney 41 

Blanks 7 

Representative in General Court 

Vernon R. Fletcher 568 

Paula K. Lewellen 321 

Scatter ing 2 

Blanks 162 

Clerk of Courts 



John J. Pappalia 347 

Scatter ing 2 

Blanks 704 



52 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Register of Deeds 

William B. Bailey 740 

George L. Leavitt, Jr. 80 

Blanks 233 

County Commissioners ( 2 ) 

William G. Andrew 757 

Albert L. Daigle 612 

Scat t er ing 2 

Blanks 735 

* * * 

Senator in Congress Democrat i c 

Edward M. Kennedy 185 

Blanks 42 



Gov 



er nor 



Endicott Peabody 157 

Francis X. Bellotti 59 

Pas quale Caggiano 

John L. Droney 9 

Blanks 2 

Lieutenant Governor 

John W. Costello 165 

Blanks 62 

Attorney General 

James W. Hennigan, Jr. 153 

Blanks 74 

Secretary 

Kevin H. White 180 

Blanks 47 



53 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



lr easur er 

Robert 0. Crane 144 

John Joseph Buckley 24 

Louise Day Hicks 24 

John F, Kennedy 12 

Blanks 23 

Au d i t o r 

Thomas J. Buckley 107 

Scatter ing 3 

Blanks 117 

Congressman. 5th District 

George W. Arvanitis 66 

Andrew L. Benson 49 

David G. Bloch 48 

Blanks 64 

Councillor, 3rd District 

George F. Cronin, Jr. 52 

J. Laurence Golden, Jr. 22 

Francis X. McDonough 18 

William C. Murphy 10 

John L. Myham 8 

Alfred I. Priest 22 

Edward L. Snyder 51 

Blanks 44 

Senator. 5th Middlesex 

Albert J. Hayes 83 

Bruce R. MacDonald 32 

Pasquale Sclafani 57 

Sc at t er ing 2 

Blanks 53 

Representative in General Court 

Chandler H. Stevens 10 

Franklin D. Hunt 25 

Sc at t er ing 1 

Blanks 191 



54 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Clerk of Courts 

Edward J. Sullivan 159 

Blanks 68 

Register of Deeds 

Edmund C. Buckley 108 

Albert DiSilva 10 

James F. Fitzgerald 59 

Blanks 50 

County Commissioners (2) 

John F, Dever, Jr, 117 

R o c c o J . An tonelli 25 

Hugh E. Buckley 12 

Thomas J. Burke 39 

Philip J. Byrne 26 

John F. Cremens 52 

Joseph LoPresti 12 

Blanks 171 

Democratic recount for office of Senator, 5th 

Middlesex, was held on Monday, September 21, 1964, 
with the result that no difference from the orig- 
inal count was found. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 13, 1964 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the 
meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. 
Charles Y. Wadsworth. The invocation was given, 
the return of the Warrant was read, and at 7:40 P.M., 
there being a quorum present (100), the following 
transactions tooJ< place: 

Ar t icle 1 . To determine whether the Town 
will accept Deerhaven Road and Partridge Lane as 
Town ways, laid out and located by the Board of 



55 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen, as shown on "Plan of Land in Lincoln" 
dated May 10, 1958, Fred A. Joyce, Surveyor, re- 
corded with Middlesex South Registry District, 
Book 633, Page 46, and for this purpose authorize 
said Board to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, 
or otherwise, in so far as necessary, the land 
thereon shown as part of said ways, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as Town 

ways Deerhaven Road and Partridge Lane, as shown 
on "Plan of Land in Lincoln", dated May 10, 1958, 
Fred A. Joyce, Surveyor, recorded with Middlesex 
South Registry District, Book 633, Page 46; and 
that the Town for this purpose authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, 
or otherwise, insofar as necessary, the land there- 
in contained . 

Art icle 2 . To determine whether the Town 
will accept Goose Pond Road, beginning at Sandy 
Pond Road and running through its intersection with 
Deer Run, and Deer Run, as Town ways, laid out and 
located by the Board of Selectmen as shown on "Sub- 
division Plan of Land in Concord and Lincoln" dated 
May, 1959, as amended by "Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Lincoln", dated April, 1961, Rowland H. Barnes 
Co., Civil Engineers, recorded with Middlesex South 
Registry District, Book 683, Page 196, and for this 
purpose authorize said Board to acquire by eminent 
domain, purchase, or otherwise, insofar as necessary, 
the land thereon shown as part of said ways, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town accept as Town 
ways Goose Pond Road, beginning at Sandy Pond Road 
and running through its intersection with Deer Run, 
and Deer Run, as shown on "Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Concord and Lincoln", dated May, 1959, as amended 
by "Subdivision Plan of Land in Lincoln", dated 
April, 1961, both by Rowland H. Barnes Co., Civil 
Engineers; and both recorded with Middlesex South 
Registry District, Book 683, Page 196; and that the 
Town for this purpose authorize the Board of Se- 
lectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase or 
otherwise, insofar as necessary, the land therein 
contained . 



56 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Ar t i c 1 e 3 . To determine whether the Town 
will accept Stonehedge as a Town way, laid out and 
located by the Board of Selectmen as shown on "Sub- 
division Plan of Land in Lincoln and Weston", dated 
August 4, 1961, Schofield Brothers, Surveyors, re- 
corded with Middlesex South Registry District, Book 
668, Page 8, and for this purpose authorize said 
Board to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or 
otherwise, insofar as necessary, the land thereon 
shown as part of said way, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept Stonehedge 

as a Town way as shown on "Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Lincoln and Weston", dated August 4, 1961, Scho- 
field Brothers, Surveyors, recorded with Middlesex 
South Registry District, Book 668, Page 8, and that 
the Town for this purpose authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, 
or otherwise, insofar as necessary, the land there- 
in contained . 

Art ic le 4 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to convey to Robert M. Malloy, or his 
assign, a certain triangular parcel of land located 
off Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts, and shown 
as Lot 2 on plan entitled, "Subdivision of Land 
owned by the Town of Lincoln", dated September 30, 
1964, Snelling, Hilton &. Associates, Civil Engineers 
and Land Court Surveyors, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTE D : The Selectmen having determined 

that a certain triangular parcel of land located off 
Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts, shown as Lot 
2 on plan entitled "Subdivision of Land owned by the 
Town of Lincoln", dated September 30, 1964, Snelling, 
Hilton & Associates, Civil Engineers and Land Court 
Surveyors, is no longer necessary to the Town for 
the purposes it was originally taken, and that the 
Town convey for the consideration of one dollar said 
parcel to the abutting owner, Robert M. Malloy, or 
his assignees . 

Art icle 5 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to release any rights it may have to en- 
force a sixteen foot unlocated right-of-way across 
land acquired by Robert M. Malloy from the Boston &, 
Maine Railroad by deed dated July 15, 1958, recorded 



57 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 9184, Page 170, or take any other action rel- 
at ive thereto . 

VOTED ; That the Town release any 

rights it may have to enforce a sixteen foot unlo- 
cated right-of-way across land acquired by Robert 
M. Malloy from the Boston & Maine Railroad by deed 
dated July 15, 1958, recorded with Middlesex South 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 9184, Page 170. 

Ar t i c 1 e 6 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to amend the Zoning Map of Lincoln, Mass- 
achusetts, dated February 2, 1953, as heretofore 
amended, by changing from R-2 General Residence Dis- 
trict to B-l Retail Business District a rectangular 
parcel of land lying southerly of Lincoln Road and 
contiguous to the present B-l Retail Business Dis- 
trict and the Boston & Maine Railroad, containing 
approximately 10,400 square feet, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town amend the Zoning 

Map of Lincoln, Massachusetts, dated February 2, 
1953, as heretofore amended, by changing from R-2 
General Residence District to B-l Retail Business 
District a parcel of land lying southerly from and 
contiguous to the present B-l Retail Business Dis- 
trict off Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Mass., said parcel 
being bounded one hundred feet on the west by the 
Boston & Maine Railroad, one hundred feet on the 
east by land of the Town of Lincoln, on the north 
by the present B-l District, and on the south by 
land of Malloy, presently zoned as R-2 General Res- 
idence District, and parallel to and 100 feet from 
the said present B-l District. 

Ar t i c 1 e 7 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to declare certain parcels of land shown 
as Lots 3 and 4 on a plan entitled "Subdivision of 
Land owned by the Town of Lincoln" dated September 
30, 1964, Snelling, Hilton &, Associates, Civil En- 
gineers and Land Court Surveyors, as access right- 
of-way to the private way known as Ridge Road, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town declare certain 

parcels of land shown as Lots 3 and 4 on a plan en- 
titled "Subdivision of Land owned by the Town of 
Lincoln", dated September 30, 1964, Snelling, Hilton 

58 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



&. Associates, Civil Engineers and Land Court Sur- 
veyors, as an access right-of-way to the private 
way known as Ridge Road. 

Ar t ic 1 e 8 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to pave, in a manner suitable for road 
purposes, all or part of the parcel of land shown 
as Lot 3 on a plan entitled "Subdivision of Land 
owned by the Town of Lincoln", dated September 30, 
1964, Snelling, Hilton &. Associates, Civil Engin- 
eers and Land Court Surveyors, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorize the 

Selectmen to pave, in a manner suitable for road 
purposes, all or part of the parcel of land shown 
as Lot 3 on a plan "Subdivision of Land owned by 
the Town of Lincoln", dated September 30, 1964, 
Snelling, Hilton &. Associates, Civil Engineers and 
Land Court Surveyors. 

Ar t ic 1 e 9 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to purchase from Robert M. Malloy a par- 
cel of land, containing approximately 3,419 square 
feet on the westerly side of the Boston &, Maine 
Railroad tracks, north of Lincoln Road, Lincoln, 
Mass., as shown on plan entitled "Land in Lincoln, 
Mass. - B. & M. R. R. to Robert M. Malloy", dated 
May, 1963, and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
one thousand, three hundred dollars ($1,300), or 
any other sum, or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

VOTED : That the Town purchase from 

Robert M . Ma Hoy for parking purposes a parcel of 
land, containing approximately 3,419 square feet, 
on the westerly side of the Boston &, Maine Railroad 
tracks, north of Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Mass., as 
shown on a plan entitled "Land in Lincoln, Mass. - 
B. & M. R. R. to Robert M. Malloy", dated May, 1963, 
and appropriate the sum of one thousand three hun- 
dred dollars ($1,300) therefor, said sum to be ta- 
ken from free cash. 

Art icle 10 . To determine whether the Town 
will vote to purchase for school access and parking 
purposes 4,400 square feet of land with buildings 
thereon, situated on the southerly side of Lincoln 



59 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts, now or formerly 
owned by Joseph F. & Nellie M. Hurd, and authorize 
and direct the Selectmen in their discretion to 
dispose of the building thereon within one year of 
said purchase, and to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $6,000 therefor, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED ; That the Town purchase, for 

school access and parking purposes, 4,400 square 
feet of land with buildings thereon, situated on 
the southerly side of Lincoln Road, Lincoln, Mass- 
achusetts, now or formerly owned by Joseph F. & 
Nellie M. Hurd, authorize and direct the Selectmen 
in their discretion to dispose of the building 
thereon within one year of said purchase, and appro- 
priate the sum of $6,000 therefor, said sum to be 
taken from free cash. 

Art icle 11. To determine whether the Town 
will vote to approve or disapprove the amount of 
indebtedness, namely $2,460,000, authorized by vote 
of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School 
Committee on September 25, 1964, for the purpose of 
constructing and equipping additions to the exist- 
ing regional school building; pass any vote or take 
any action relative thereto. 

(At this point permission was asked and 
granted to allow the following to enter the hall 
and explain in detail Article 11: From Regional 
School Committee: Howard W. Emmons, Chairman, Sud- 
bury, Mrs. David R. Kirshner, Sudbury, Joseph E. 
Brown, Sudbury; From Regional School Building Com- 
mittee: Burleigh Cruikshank, Chairman, Sudbury, 
Mrs. Stanley Taub , Sudbury, Richard A. Schmalz, 
Sudbury; From Regional High School: C. Newton Heath, 
Superintendent, Sudbury, Dr. Leslie Tourville, 
Principal, Sudbury; From Rich and Tucker, Associates, 
Architects: Berton V. Phinney, who explained the 
proposed additions, etc.) 

VOTED: That the Town approve the 

amount of indebtedness, namely $2,460,000, author- 
ized by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Dis- 
trict School Committee on September 25, 1964,. for 
the purpose of constructing and equipping additions 
to the existing regional school building, facilities 
and ground s . 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 
60 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



STATE AND NATIONAL ELECTION 
November 3, 1964 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls 
were open at 7:00 A. M. for the bringing in of votes 
to the Election Officers for the national, state 
and county officers, listed below. The Polls were 
declared open at 7:00 A. M . by Mr . Everett Sherman, 
Jr., the Warden. Margaret Algeo, Sadie Sherman, 
Catherine Coan and Elizabeth J. Snelling were sworn 
as Ballot Clerks. Mr. Richard J. Eaton and Mr. 
Robert L. Filbin assisted Mr. Sherman in his duties 
as Warden throughout the day. The Polls were de- 
clared closed at 7:30 P. M. , with the following 
results: (Total number of votes - 2105.) 

Electors of President and Vice President 



Goldwater &, Miller 
Haas L Blomen 
Johnson &, Humphrey 
Dunn &, Shaw 
Blanks 



Republ ican 
Social ist-Labor 
Democr at ic 
Prohibition 



703 

5 

1290 

14 

93 



Senator in Congress 



Edward M. Kennedy 
Howard Whitmore, Jr. 
Laurence Gilfedder 
Grace F. Luder 
Blanks 



Democrat i c 
Republ ican 
Soc ial ist-Labor 
Prohibition 



932 

1127 

5 

5 

36 



Gov 



er nor 



Francis X. Bellotti 
John A. Volpe 
Francis A. Votano 
Guy S. Williams 
Scatter ing 
Blanks 



Democrat ic 
Republ ican 
Socialist-Labor 
Prohibit ion 



322 

1732 

11 

2 

7 

31 



Lieutenant Governor 



John W. Costello 
Elliott L. Richardson 
Edgar E. Gaudet 
Prescott E. Grout 
Bl anks 



Democrat ic 
Republ ican 
Social ist-Labor 
Prohibit ion 



286 

1764 

4 

3 

48 



61 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Attorney General 



Edward W. Brooke 
James W. Hennigan, Jr. 
Willy A. Hogsett 
Howard B. Rand 
Bl anks 



Republ ican 
Democrat ic 
Social is t -Labor 
Prohibition 



1877 

195 



5 

28 



Seer etar y 



Kevin H. White 
Wallace B. Crawford 
Fred M. Ingersoll 
Julia B. Kohler 
Blanks 



Democrat ic 
Republ ican 
Soc ial is t -Lab or 
Prohibit ion 



877 

1150 

5 



73 



Tr easur er 



Robert 0. Crane 
Robert C. Hahn 
Warren C. Carberg 
Ar ne A. Sortell 
Blanks 



Democrat ic 
Republ ican 
Prohibit ion 
Socialist-Labor 



538 

1442 

5 

2 

118 



Au d i t o r 



Thaddeus Buczko 
Elwynn J. Miller 
John Charles Hedges 
Ethelbert L. Nevins 
Blanks 



Democrat ic 
Republ ican 
Prohibit ion 
Social is t -Labor 



413 

1542 

7 

5 

138 



Congressman. 5th District 



F. Bradford Morse 
George W. Arvanitis 
Blanks 



Republ ican 
Democrat ic 



1770 

267 

68 



Councillor. 3rd District 

Perlie Dyar Chase 
George F. Cronin, Jr. 
Blanks 



Republ ican 
Democrat ic 



1500 
429 
126 



62 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Senator, 5th Middlesex District 

James DeNormandie Republican 1821 

Pasquale Sclafani Democratic 242 

Blanks 42 

Representative in General Court - 35th Middlesex 

Vernon R. Fletcher Republican 920 

Chandler H, Stevens, Jr. Independent 994 

Franklin D. Hunt 87 

Blanks 104 

Clerk of Courts. Middlesex County 

Edward J. Sullivan Democratic 629 

John J. Pappalia Republican 1313 

Blanks 163 

Register of Deeds. Middlesex South District 

Edmund C. Buckley Democratic 679 

William B. Bailey Republican 1275 

Blanks 151 

County Commissioners. Middlesex County (2) 

William G. Andrew Republican 1503 

John F. Dever , Jr. Democratic 553 

John F. Cremens Democratic 304 

Albert L. Daigle Republican 1129 

Blanks 721 

Question No. 1 (4-year term for Governor, etc.) 

Yes 1738 

No 168 

Blanks 199 

Question No. 2 (Enabling General Court to provide 
continuity in government in the event of enemy 
at tack ) 

Yes 1815 

No 92 

Blanks 198 



63 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Question No, 3 (Requiring 2/3 vote of the 
General Court to give, loan or pledge the credit 
of the Commonwealth) 

Yes 1508 

No 342 

Blanks 255 

Question No. 4 (Authorizing Governor and Execu- 
tive Council to require opinions of the Judicial 
Court on questions of law.) 

Yes 1755 

No 114 

Blanks 236 

Question No. 5 (Removal of certain powers from 
the Executive Council.) 

Yes 1661 

No 270 

Blanks 174 

Question No. 6 (Repealing law providing for 
certain salary increases for members of the 
General Court.) 

Yes 8 76 

No 9 58 

Blanks 271 

Question No. 7 (Local liquor laws.) 

A. Yes 378 

1540 
187 

432 

1446 

227 

605 

130 8 

192 

On November 19, 1964, there was a recount of the 
ballots cast for State Senator, 5th Middlesex, un> 



64 



Yes 


No 


Blanks 


Yes 


No 


Blanks 


Yes 


No 


Blanks 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



der the direction of D. Everett Sherman, Jr , , 
with extra Ballot Clerks Alan McClennen, George 
Gilbert, Catherine Coan and Mary Murphy. The 
result was: James DeNormandie 1822 and Pasquale 
Sclafani 241, with two protested ballots. The 
blanks remained the same at 42. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



65 



FINANCE 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 19 6 4 



Ge n e r a 1 



Water 



Total 



Cash balance 1/1/64 
Receipts - 1964: 
(See Accountant's 
report for detail) 

Salary transfers 

Warrant payments, 
1964 

Cash balance & 
Treasury bills, 
12/31 '** 



$1,220,813.61 $ 16,320.93 $1,237,134.54 



2,462, 738.99 



+ 1 , 575 .00 



3,064. 876.89 



162,352.87 2,625,091.86 
-1,575.00 

133. 256.60 -3.198 .133.49 



$ 620,250.71 $ 43,842.20 $ 664,092.91 



Cash balance 1,2/31/64 : 

Harvard Trust Co. 
N. E. Merchants 

National 
Lexington Trust Co. 
Concord Cooperative 

Bank 
First Nat'l Bank of 

Boston 
Belmont Savings Bank 
Beverly Savings Bank 
Boston 5£ Savings Bank 
Brookline Savings Bank 
Cambridge Savings Bank 
Charlestown Savings Bk . 
Lynn 5£ Savings Bank 
Newton Savings Bank 
Provident Institution 

for Savings 
Waltham Savings Bank 
Warren Institution for 

Savings 

US Treasury bills @ cost 

$100,000 due 1/14/65 

100,000 due 1/28/65 

100,000 due 2/11/65 

100,000 due 2/25/65 



24, 174.09 


13,842.20 


38,016.29 


109 , 897.65 


30,000.00 


139,897.65 


10 , 160.94 


--- 


10,160.94 


6,000.00 


--- 


6,000.00 


708.82 


___ 


708.82 


6,186.89 





6,186.89 


6, 709.17 





6,709.17 


6 , 215.54 





6,215.54 


3,453.50 


— _ 


3,453.50 


7,412.49 





7,412.49 


7,738.75 





7,738.75 


6,906.71 





6,906.71 


6,947.50 


--- 


6,947.50 


7,042.33 


_ _ _ 


7,042.33 


,4, 217.70 





4,217.70 


10, 122.46 


___ 


10,122.46 


• 

99,147.17 


| mm m m 


99,147.17 


99 , 215 .56 




99 , 215 .56 


99 ,070.44 





99,070.44 


98 .923.00 





98 .923.00 



$620, 250.71 



$43, 842.20 



$664,092.91 



Frederick B. Taylor, Treasurer 



66 



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68 



FINANCE 



CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1964 
Proceeds of cemetery lots sold in 1964 
Interest income on savings bank deposit 



Deposited in Middlesex Institution 

for Savings 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



$927 .50 



447.58 



$ 80.00 

1 , 771.50 

447 .58 

$ 2 , 299 .08 



1 . 375 .08 
$ 924.00 



Bank Deposits at December 31. 1964 

Cash on deposit, First National Bank 

of Boston 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



$ 924.00 

12. 125. 35 

$ 13 . 049 .35 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1964 
Appropriation by Town at 1964 
Annual Town Meeting 
Less: Land purchase payment, 
per Town vote 
Interest on savings bank deposit 



Deposited in Boston 5£ Savings Bk . 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



$4, 650.00 
4 . 000 .00 

600.00 
49.23 



$ 5.55 



650.00 

49 .23 

704.78 



649 .23 
$ 55 . 55 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1964 



First National Bank of Boston 
Boston 5£ Savings Bank 



$ 55.55 

1 . 664.72 

$ 1 . 720.27 



Frederick B. Taylor, Treasurer 



69 



FINANCE 



STABILIZATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1964 $ 38.21 

Appropriations to Fund at 1964 
Annual Town Meeting: 

For schools $20,000.00 

For equipment 10,000.00 

For land acquisition 4 , 650 .00 34,650.00 

Interest income 2,944.36 

$37 , 632. 57 

Appropriated from Fund at 1964 

Annual Town Meeting: 

For purchase of land $20,000.00 

Deposited in savings banks 14,650.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 2 . 944. 36 37 . 594. 36 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 $ 38 . 21 

Bank Deposits at December 31, 1964 

First National Bank of Boston 
Boston 5£ Savings Bank 
Home Savings Bank 
Natick 5<? Savings Bank 
Suffolk-Franklin Savings Bank 
Warren Institution for Savings 
Whitman Savings Bank 



Earmarked Balance in Fund 

For schools $40,000.00 

For land acquisition 3,700.00 

For general equipment 28,000.00 

Unallocated increment 11 , 429 . 98 

$83 .129 .98 



$ 


38, 


.21 


25 


,553, 


,19 


7 


,056, 


.74 


5 


,456, 


.48 


27 


, 693, 


.72 


10 


,137. 


,85 


7 


,193, 


.79 


$83 


,129. 


,98 



Frederick B. Taylor, Treasurer 



70 



FINANCE 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

40,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $10,000 
each December 1, 1965-1968, issued under 
Chapter 208, Acts of 1948. 

16,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 
each December 1, 1965-1968, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

84,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $12,000 
each December 1, 1965-1971, issued under 
Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

28,000 School Building Loan, 1 3/4%, due $4,000 
each December 1, 1965-1971, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

260,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 
each October 1, 1965-1977, issued under 
the Acts of 1948. 

40,000 School Construction Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 
each October 1, 1965-1972, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

165,000 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $15,000 

each November 1, 1965-1967, and $10,000 

each November 1, 1968-1979, issued under 
the Acts of 1948. 

670,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $40,000 
each November 15, 1965-1972, and $35,000 
each November 15, 1973-1982, issued under 
the Acts of 1948. 

90,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000 

each November 15, 1965-1982, issued under 
the Acts of 1948. 



$1,393,000 Total school loans 

65,000 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due 
$5,000 each October 1, 1965-1977, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

30,000 Library Addition Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 
each August 1, 1965-1970, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

23,500 Land Purchase Loan, 2.80%, due $8,500 

December 1, 1965, and $5,000 each December 1, 
1966-1968. 



$1,511,500 Net Debt 



( cont . ) 
71 



FINANCE 



OUTSTANDING DEBT, Continued 



10,000 Water Main Loan, 2.70%, due $5,000 each 

October 1, 1965-1966, issued under Chapter 
44, General Laws, as amended. 

20,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.50%, due $5,000 each 
August 1, 1965-1968, issued under Chapter 
44, General Laws, as amended. 

95,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $10,000 each August 
1, 1965-1972, $8,000 on August 1, 1973, and 
$7,000 on August 1, 1974, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended. 

5,000 Water Mains Loan, 2.80%, due $1,000 each 

December 1, 1965-1969, issued under Chapter 
44, General Laws, as amended. 



$1,641,500 Total debt 



Frederick B. Taylor, Treasurer 



72 



F I NANCE 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 



Real and Personal 

Valuation 1962, less abatements 

Valuation 1963, less abatements 

Valuation 1964, less abatements 

Motor Vehicle 

Valuation 1962, less abatements 

Valuation 1963, less abatements 

Valuation 1964, less abatements 



$8 , 963 , 117 .00 

9,170, 819 .00 

13 , 646 , 401 .00 



1 ,811 , 365 .00 
1 , 866 , 437 .00 
1 ,989 , 467.00 



Net Valuation 
Average Net Valuation 
5% Legal Borrowing 
Capac i t y 



$37 , 447 , 606.00 
12,482,535.0 

624 ,126.00 



FUNDED DEBT 



General, Inside Limit 

Outs ide Limit 
Enterprise, Water 



$ 202,500.00 

1 , 309 ,000 .00 

130 .000 .00 



TOTAL FUNDED DEBT, January 1, 1965 



$1 , 641 , 500 .00 



AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY, Jan. 1, 1965 $ 421,626.00 



M. Elizabeth Causer, Town Accountant 



73 



FINANCE 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Current Year 
Per sonal 
Real Estate 



Pr ior Years 
Poll Tax 
Personal Tax 
Real Es tat e 



From the State 
Income Tax 

Income Tax, Ch. 69,70,71 
Corporation Tax 
Meals Tax 
Reimbursement, loss of 

taxes 
Aid to Libraries 
Land Acquisition 



City of Cambridge, in lieu 
of taxes 

Permits 
Build ing 
Plumbing 
Wir ing 



F ines 
C our t 



$ 82,904. 36 
953, 327 .40 



6.00 

55.00 

19 .066.46 



19 , 662.81 

114,865.24 

3 8 ,848.26 

896.63 

852.40 
1 ,403.25 
4 .000 .00 



1 , 830.20 
388.00 
414.25 



$1 , 036 , 231 .76 



19 ,127.46 



180, 528.59 



1, 249.79 



2, 632.45 



275.00 



Grants and Gifts 

School Construction 
School Transportation 



From Federal Grants 
Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Adm. 
Medical Aid to Aged 
Medical Aid to Aged, Adm. 
Disability Assistance 
Disability Assistance, Adm 



School Aid, Ch. 864 
School Aid, Ch. 874 
Air Force School Operation 



60 , 615.84 
30 .915 . 85 



4,915 .00 
432.06 

7,267.91 
733.29 
186.00 
128.0 6 



14,501 .81 

19 , 382.00 

383 . 610 .57 



91 ,531.69 



13, 662.32 



417,494.38 



74 



FINANCE 



From County 
Dog License s 
Sale of Dogs 



Pr ivileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
Levy of 1961 
Levy of 1962 
Levy of 1963 
Levy of 1964 
Farm Animal Excise 



$ 



819 .10 
3.00 



99 .35 

18 .50 

29 ,946.77 

119 , 397.16 

76 .55 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 
Town Clerk 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Town Hall Rental 



173 


.93 


4 


.00 


65 


.00 


130 


.00 


30 


,00 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



Sealer of Weights &, Measures 
Police - Pistol permits 

Insurance reports 
Miscellaneous 
Regional School 

Attendance Officer 
Services 



Fire Department - B. & M. R. R. 

Tree Department 

Dutch Elm Removal, private 

property 
Fogging (Mosquito Control) 



50.15 

43.00 

225 .50 

15 .00 

150 .00 
116 . 20 



225 .00 
56 .00 



Dog Inoculations 
Nu rses fees 
Garbage collections 
Licenses 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 

123.50 

46 .50 

8 , 476. 31 

44.50 



S 



822.10 



149 ,538.33 



402.93 



599.85 
106.00 



281 .00 



8 , 690 . 81 



75 



FINANCE 



HIGHWAYS 



Miscellaneous 

Chapter 90 - Construction 

State Aid 

County Aid 



Chapter 90 - Maintenance 
State Aid 
County Aid 



Snow Removal - State Aid 
Chapter 782 
Chapter 822 



$ 15 ,925.17 
7.962.58 



1 , 500 .00 
1 , 500.00 



$ 189.75 



23,887.75 



3, 000 .00 
1, 397.25 
9 , 352.80 
9 , 352.80 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



State Reimbursement 
Old Age Assistance 
Old Age Assistance Adm. 
Medical Aid to Aged 
Medical Aid to Aged Adm. 
Disability Assistance 
Disability Assistance Adm. 



Veterans 1 Services 



3, 702.98 




266.46 




4, 726.86 




317.14 




54.64 




38.81 






9 , 106.89 




290.51 



SCHOOL AND LIBRARY 



Madison Project 

Tuition 

Vocational Education 

State reimbursement 
Gym rent and miscellaneous 
Milk Fund 

Air Force School Cafeteria 
Library Fines 



1 ,000.00 
1 , 166.00 

80.00 

410.15 

6, 726,31 

16,166.50 

2.048.16 



27, 597.12 



76 



FINANCE 



UNCLASSIFIED 



DeCordova reimbursement for 

State Audit 
Water Department reimbursement 
Insurance settlements 
Air Force School, B. C. - B. S 

re imbur semen t 
Air Force liability insurance, 

re imbur seme nt 
Insurance dividend 



200.00 
1 , 309. 54 
2 ,045 . 24 

1 , 317 .80 

833. 67 
865 .81 



$ 6 ,572.06 



Swimming program 
Stage-mob ile 
Tennis instruction 
Skiing instruction 
Arts & crafts 



RECREATION 



CEMETERIES 



1 , 428 .25 
104 . 30 
633 .00 
213.00 
704 .00 



3 , 082 . 55 



Interments 
Foundations 
Perpetual Care funds 



535 .00 

63.75 

1 . 625 .60 



2, 224. 35 



INTEREST 



Interest on taxes 

Interest on U. S. Gov't Bonds 

Interest on savings accounts 



780.88 

16 ,902.70 

3 . 000 . 24 



AGENCY TRUST &. INVESTMENTS 



Agency 

Dog Licenses 
Grammar School Fund 
Group Insurance dividend 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Transfer from Water Department 



REFUNDS 



1 


, 291 


.50 




49 


.42 




803 


.03 


1 


,002 


.18 


1 


,575 


,00 



20 , 683.82 



4, 721 .14 



General Departments 



1 ,202.43 



77 



FINANCE 



LOANS 



Employee deductions 
Mass. tax payment for 

services 
Temporary loan 
Premium & interest on 

Land Loan 
Land Loan 



Total General Receipts 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1964 



$194, 863.76 

101.75 
200,000.00 

12.80 
23 . 500 .00 



$ 418,478.31 

2,464, 313.99 

1 . 220.813.61 

$3, 685, 127.60 



WATER REVENUE 



Water Rates 
Water Connections 
Water Miscellaneous 
Hydrant rentals 
Water Loans 
Premium on loan 
Interest on loan 
Wes-Lex Corporation 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1964 



$ 45,269.68 

3 ,085.00 

337.38 

3 ,495.00 

100 ,000.00 

147.25 

18.56 

10 .000.00 



$ 162,352.87 

16.320.93 

$ 178,673.80 



78 



FINANCE 



EXPENDITURES 
Payments on Selectmen's Warrants 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selec tmen 

Executive Secretary 

Finance Committee 

Town Of f ice 

Town Accountant 

Treasurer 

Col lee tor 

Assessor s 

Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election & Registration 

Planning Board 

Board of Ap peals 

Conservation Commission 

Consulting &, Engineering 

Town Hall 



925 . 30 




8,835.00 




15.00 




15 , 247.53 




4 , 153 .09 




1 , 144.16 




3,786.55 




1 , 272.94 




3 ,093 .25 




672 .05 




1,713.73 




5 , 234. 21 




155 .64 




43.60 




4 , 476.48 




12 . 825 .68 






$ 63, 594.21 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



Po 1 i c e 

Fire 

C ommunicat ions 

Civil Defense 

Fire & Police Building 

Park Department 

Inspection of Buildings 



42 


,570.78 


33 


,051 .92 


16 


, 423. 31 




874. 35 


9 


, 530 . 80 


17 


,018 .45 


1 


.013.50 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Salar ies 

Expense 

Inspection services 

Garbage collection 

Inspector of Animals 



4 


,897, 


.75 




576, 


,80 




728, 


,22 


8 


,122, 


,18 




100 , 


,00 



Highways, General 

Highway Building 

Weston Road 

Winter Street 

Equ ipment 

Chapter 90 - Maintenance 

Chapter 90 - Construction 



HIGHWAYS 






76, 864.49 




1 ,593.03 




5 , 377.33 




389 .55 




10 , 860.05 




4 , 500 .00 


n 


46 . 511 .96 



120 , 573.11 



14,424.95 



146 ,096.41 



79 



FINANCE 



CHARITIES 



Aid to Citizens 
Admin is tr at ion 
Veterans* Services 



$ 27,344.99 

2,605.45 

167.84 



EDUCATION 

Elementary School 

Regional High School 

Elementary School Construction 

Chapter 864 

Chapter 874 

Air Force School 



LIBRARY 



Library 

Library Building 



RECREATION 



611 ,154 

196, 306 

719 ,908 

10, 788 

8 , 622 



61 
45 
54 
47 
12 



344.185.48 



29 , 263. 39 
5.255.43 



$ 30 , 118.28 



1 ,890, 965.67 



34,518.82 



Playground 
Swimming 



6,497.52 
1 .823.80 



8, 321.32 



CEMETERIES 



Ceme t er ies 



5 ,104.84 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 
Employee Insurance & 

Hospitalization Fund 
Property &, Indemnity Insurance 
Dump Rent &, Maintenance 
Town Reports 
Memorial Day 
July 4th 

Preservation of Town Records 
Purchase of old Telephone Bldg. 
Purchase of B. & M. land 
Purchase of DiPerna land 
Purchase of Garland land 
Stabilization Fund 
Conservation Fund 



13, 222.03 



11,101 


.02 


14, 391 


.17 


4,500 


.00 


2,480 


.25 


215 


.57 


999 


.90 


60 


.22 


6 ,000 


.00 


2 ,000 


.00 


43, 500 


.00 


4 , 000 


.00 


14,650 


.00 


650 


,00 



117, 770.16 



80 



FINANCE 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 



Bond payments 
Interest on bonds 
Interest on Tax Notes 



$125 , 000 .00 
48, 755 .00 

1,399.04 



$ 175 , 154.04 



Refund s 



REFUNDS 



5 , 849 .87 



AGENCY TRUST L INVESTMENT 

Dog Licenses due County 1,287.25 

Sale of dogs 3.00 

Milk Fund 6 , 688 .99 

Hanscom School Cafeteria 17,285.06 

Repayment of temporary loan 200,000.00 

State Parks &. Reservations 3,514.46 

State Audit 2,494.23 

County Hospital Assessment 632.56 

County Tax 25,178.42 

Motor Vehicle Excise bills 439 . 35 



Employee Deductions 

Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance December 31, 1964 



257, 523. 32 

194. 861 .89 

$3 , 064, 876. 89 

620 . 250 . 71 
$3, 685 , 127.60 



EXPENDITURES 
WATER DEPARTMENT 



Oper at ing 

Pumping Station 

Bonds &, Interest 

Water Mains 

Water Main Cleaning 

Bid Deposits 

Premium on Bonds 



33, 166 .06 

4, 214.61 

11,037 .50 

74, 290.17 

11,927.61 

70.00 

125 .65 



Total Water Department Expenditures 
Cash Balance December 31, 1964 



$ 134,831.60 

43. 842.20 
$ 178, 673.80 



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F I NANCE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 19 6 4 
GENERAL ACCOUNTS 

ASSETS 

Cash : 

General $620,250.71 

Water 43,842.20 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes : 

Levy of 1961: 

Real 287.36 

Levy of 1962: 

Personal 87.55 

Real 535.60 623.15 

Levy of 1963: 

Personal 173.60 

Real 3,149 .34 3,322.94 

Levy of 1964: 

Personal 207.90 

Real 16 . 568.26 16,776.16 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 

Levy of 1961 2,378.12 

Levy of 1962 1,782.48 

Levy of 1963 3,338.32 

Levy of 1964 15. 354.45 22,853.37 

Estate of Deceased Persons 1,716.70 

Board of Health, Garbage 

Collections 343.74 

State Aid to Highways 12,574,83 

County Aid to Highways 1,037.42 

Loans Authorized - Water 17,000.00 

Underestimates - County Tax 1,563.19 

Water: 

Rates 1963 9.42 

Rates 1964 6 , 299 .12 6,308.54 

Miscellaneous 311.32 

$ 748. 811.63 



96 



FINANCE 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVE 

Proceeds of Dog Licenses: 

Due County $ 11.75 

Trust Fund Income: 

Julian DeCordova School Equipment 966.18 

Grammar School Fund 49.42 

Federal Grants : 

Disability Assistance Adm. $ 196.26 

Disability Assistance 320.94 
Aid to Dependent Families, 

Adm. 221.79 

Aid to Dependent Families 229.72 

Old Age Assistance Adm. 4.97 

Old Age Assistance 2,650.86 

Medical Aid to Aged Adm. 264.14 

Medical Aid to Aged 2 , 193 . 79 6,082.47 

School s : 

P. L. 874 21,756.85 

P. L. 864 8,776.47 

Madison Fund 4,800.00 

Air Force School 233,000.39 

School Milk Fund 443.14 

Air Force School Cafeteria 1 . 393 . 39 270,170.24 

State Aid to Libraries 1,403.25 

Special Taxes Revenue 1,716.70 

Appropriation Balances: 
Revenue : 

General 35,949.55 

Non-Revenue : 

School Construction 84,105.27 120,054.82 

Water 38,782.22 

Loans Authorized Unissued 17,000.00 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1961 287.36 

Levy of 1962 449.13 

Levy of 1963 3,322.94 

Levy of 1964 8. 713.77 12,773.20 

Overlay Surplus 10,278.97 

Premium on land purchase loan 12.80 

Premium on water loans 40.16 



( cont . ) 



97 



FINANCE 



Revenue Reserved until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise $ 22,853.37 

Water Rates 1963 9.42 

Water Rates 1964 6,299.12 

Water miscellaneous 311 . 32 6,619.86 

Board of Health - garbage 

collection 343.74 

Aid to Highways 13,612.25 

Overestimate 1964 

State Parks and Reservations 315.37 

Surplus Revenue: 

General 220,705.04 

Water 5 .019 .82 

$ 748. 811 .63 



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100 



FINANCE 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Elmer H. Ziegler 
Frank R. Stevens 
Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 



The Board reports a busy year, both in assessing new 
buildings and alterations and additions to ensure that 
each property owner pays his fair share of the property 
tax, and in evaluating our longer term problems and needs. 

We are working toward a gradual approach to the re- 
quired full and fair cash value. We find that some pro- 
fessional help in the form of appraisal consultants will 
be required to ensure that all taxable buildings are equit- 
ably assessed during one tax year as a first step before 
raising the valuations closer to full value. This will not 
be a revaluation, but simply consulting help to assist the 
Assessors in arriving at an equitable value in one year for 
all buildings, which is beyond the capabilities of a part 
time board . 

An other need is for adequate maps, but since these are 
required more urgently by the Planning Board, we are simply 
working with them to see that the Assessors' requirements 
are met along with those of the Planning Board. 

We want to thank the citizens of Lincoln for their 
cooperation during our assessing visits to their property 
which often occur at inconvenient times. We also wish to 
invite any citizen who feels he (or she) has a problem con- 
cerning his (or her) assessment to make an appointment with 
Mrs. Elizabeth Snelling to meet with the Board to discuss 
it. Our regular meetings are at 8 P. M. in the Town Hall 
on the first Tuesday of each month. 

We should like to bring to your attention the following 
deadlines and facts: 

1. The status of property on January 1st is the 
determinant of the tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abate- 
ment requests must be filed with the Board by October 1st of 
the yea"r in question. 

3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement re- 
quests must be filed with the Board before July 1 of the 
year succeeding the year in question. If you change cars 
during the year, the burden is on you to file the abatement 
request . 

4. Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1963, now Chapter 59, 
Section 5, Clause 41, of the General Laws, provides for cer- 
tain exemptions for taxpayers over the age of 70, who meet 

101 



F I NANCE 



certain requirements of income, residence, etc. Addition- 
al information may be obtained from the Assessors* office. 

5. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of 
the Purple Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a tax 
exemption. Please contact the Board to see if you qualify. 



1964 Recapitulation 
Total appropriations to be raised from 

taxation $1,454,118.52 
Total appropriations to be taken from 

available funds 140,961.14 

State Parks and Assessments: 

State Parks and Reservations 3,829.83 
Underestimate, 1963 Assessment for 

State Parks and Reservations 353.58 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 2,494.23 

Motor Excise tax bills 439.35 

County Tax and Assessments: 

County Tax 23,615.23 

Underestimate, 1963 County Tax 108.45 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 632.56 

Overlay of Current Year 30 . 626. 37 

Gross Amount to be raised $ 1,657.179.26 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

Income Tax $ 131,450.37 

Corporation Taxes 39,195.60 

Reimbursement a/c publicly owned land 852.40 

Old Age Tax 772.29 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 100,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 9,205.00 

Schools 31,716.00 

Libraries 2,171.00 

Recreation 2,087.00 

Water Department 50,697.00 

Interest 13,643.00 

State Assistance for School Construction 42,495.00 

All others 18 .940.00 

Total, Estimated Receipts $ 443,224.66 

Appropriations voted to be taken from 

Available Funds 140.961.14 

Total, Estimated Receipts and Available Funds $ '584,185.80 

Net amount to be raised by taxation 1 .072.993.46 

$ 1 .657.179.26 



102 



FINANCE 



Total Valuation: 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 



$ 1,079,530 at $77 
12 . 855 . 450 at $77 
$13 , 934 ,980 



$ 83 , 123.81 

989 , 869 . 65 
$1 ,072 ,993.46 



Nu mber of acres of land assessed 
Number of dwelling houses assessed 
Tax rate per thousand: 



School Rate 
General Rate 



$46 . 20 
30. 80 



7 , 645 .61 
1 ,072 



$77.00 



103 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENTS 
Leo J. Algeo, Chief 



I hereby submit my report for the Fire and 
Police Departments for the year ending December 31, 
1964. 

Fire Department 

The Department answered a total of 269 calls 
as listed below: 



Bu i 1 d i n g s 


9 


Chimney 


1 


Brush and woods 


68 


Motor vehicle fires 


18 


Electric wires down or 




arc ing 


29. 


Motor r ehicle accidents 


52 


Town Dump 


10 


False alarms 


3 


Miscellaneous 


79 



269 

Of the nine building fires there were five 

that resulted in any loss. These were four houses 

and one barn and the estimated loss in these fires 
was $19,650.00. 

There were only four fires caused by the 
Boston and Maine railroad engines this year and 
only one of these was of any consequence. The 
Boston and Maine has been billed $38.70 as a re- 
sult of this fire, as opposed to a total bill of 
$726.45 for fourteen fires in 1963. 

In June the Fire Department, with the Water 
Department, installed 200 feet of plastic pipe at 
the dump. 400 feet of forestry hose was left at 
the dump and with the cooperation of Harry Cook and 

104 



PROTECTION 



Everett French the number of alarms for the dump 
was cut almost in half from the 1963 figure of 19 

41 inspections were made and permits issued 
for oil burner installations or alterations. 4 
inspections were made and permits issued for the 
storage of liquified petroleum gas. 2 permits 
for blasting were issued. 

Inspections of nursing homes have been made 
in accordance with State laws. 




Fire drills have been con- 
ducted at the schools and they 
have been provided with fire 
prevention materials. 

A policy of daily, weekly 
and monthly inspections of our 
apparatus and equipment is being 
cont inued . 

On July 27, 19 64, James 
Casella, a veteran of twenty 
years service with the United 
States Air Force, was appointed 
a firefighter. Casella, who 
retired as a Master Sergeant, 
was involved in various phases 
of firefighting and rescue work 
during the last sixteen years of 
his military career. 



Since the appointment of Casella, it has been 
possible to arrange a schedule that provides one man 
on duty at the fire station 24 hours a day. 

On October 29, 1964, the new forest fire truck 
was put in service. This truck, carrying 200 gal- 
lons of water, 1000 feet of hose, water cans and 
other tools, is capable of penetrating our woodlands 
where we could not go before. It has already done 
this and will be of great help to us for future 
wood s fires. 

In September the cab portion of Engine #1, the 
Peter Pirsch truck purchased in 1957, was repainted 



105 



PROTECTION 



and lettered. This was done after negotiations 
with the Pirsch Company produced an agreement that 
they would pay the cost of $335.00 for this work. 

During 1964 16 drill sessions were conducted. 
They included programs by the Boston Edison Com- 
pany, State District Fire Warden Lionel Peletier, 
movies obtained from Hanscom Field Fire Chief James 
Gallagher, a series of drills in the spring when 
the men actually operated the equipment, and several 
sessions of testing and repacking hose in order to 
keep it in good condition. 

In addition to the above drills, the following 
men attended an all day session with the Weston Fire 
Department in June: Deputy Chief Dean, J. Ciraso, 
C. Bradley, C. Smith, Jr., E. Chisholm, D. Malloy, 
R. Malloy, and R. Swinconeck. Four men, - Deputy 
Chief Coan, J. Casella, C. Smith and C. Smith, Jr. 
spent a day in September at the New Hampshire Fire 
Chief's Training School in Fitzwilliam, N. H. 



The list of call men on the department was 
shortened by four during 1964 with five names re- 
moved and one added, making a total of thirty-one. 
Two young men, David Malloy and Steven Ziegler, are 
now in the military service, and two men have moved 
out of town. 

The fifth man lost from the department was 
Joseph Tracey who died on October 7, 1964. Joe led 
the North Lincoln "gang" for many years and was a 
devoted call man. Joe's pride in "The North Lin- 
coln truck" was apparent to all and the Town was in- 
deed fortunate to have had him. The gratefulness 
and sympathy of this department and the Town is 
hereby extended to the Tracey family. 



Police Department 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 42 
Arrests by State Police 31 

Warning notices issued for 

violations of motor 

vehicle law 186 



106 



PROTECTION 



Violations of motor 
vehicle law reported 
to Registry of Motor 
Vehicles 4 4 

Motor Vehicle Accident Report: 

Accidents reported 180 

Occupants injured 119 

Occupants killed 1 

Following is a partial list of other activities 
of the Police Department: 

Appearances in Court 41 

Emergency calls, other 

than automobile accidents 82 
Checks made at vacant 

house s 34 61 

Checks made at business 

places 4050 

Summonses served 261 

Dog complaints 126 

Miscellaneous items 

recorded 2433 

Patrolman Richard Hallett attended the Local 
Police Officer's Training School at the Massachusetts 
State Police Academy in Framingham for six weeks be- 
ginning September 14, 1964. While there he re- 
ceived instruction in Criminal Law, Motor Vehicle 
Law, First Aid, Firearms, and other related subjects. 
His completion of this course gives us 5 out of the 
6 regular men who have had this training. 

On June 4, 1964, a German Shepherd pup was 
selected for the department at a kennel in Holliston 
with assistance from Mr. Harry Rice, the Sudbury Dog 
Officer and founder of the Buddy Dog Humane Society. 
The dog is a thoroughbred and has been registered 
with the American Kennel Club as Fritz Von Lincoln. 
The dog is now undergoing obedience training once a 
week in Concord. This dog is a gift to the Police 
Department from Lincoln Grange No. 129. A year's 
supply of dog food was given to us by the B. L. Ogil- 
vie and Sons Co. of Weston. We extend our apprecia- 
tion to both these organizations. 

107 



PROTECTION 



Mrs. Anne Sturgis and Mrs. Claire Ciraso con- 
tinue to do an excellent job of protecting our chil- 
dren at the schools. 

Mrs. Lorraine Dean and Mrs. Hazel Fedock and 
all the men who operate our Communications Center 
24 hours a day also deserve a "well done". 

In October Mr. Frank Smith retired as Super- 
intendent of the Cambridge Reservoir and he and Mrs. 
Smith returned to Cambridge. Frank was Superinten- 
dent of the Reservoir for some 20 years, living on 
Trapelo Road, and as such was a Special Police Offi- 
cer here in Lincoln. Frank had worked with us on 
the Police Department and as an operator in the Com- 
munications Center. Our best wishes for happiness 
in retirement are extended to Frank and Mrs, Smith, 

Both the Fire and Police Departments would like 
to request residents of the Town to post their name 
by their driveways. This would be a great aid to 
us in locating your home when you have called us for 
assistance . 



108 



PROTECTION 



PARKS DEPARTMENT 

Albert S. Brooks, Superintendent 



The Parks Department is a very diversified 
department. Among some of its duties is the care 
of the three cemeteries, the removal, trimming and 
spraying of public trees, and brush control. 

The Dutch Elm disease ceases to be a major 
problem as far as time is concerned. Most of the 
inoculated trees seem to be standing up well, and 
a large share of the others were removed in earlier 
year s . 

The new tractor with cutter bar and front end 
loader has taken a big burden from the department. 
One month was spent mowing the sides of the roads 
with almost unbelievable results. I feel now we 
have eliminated most of the undesirable parts of 
brush control. Although some very limited spray- 
ing of brush may be necessary in a few hard or im- 
possible to get at spots, for the most part it will 
all be cut with the mower. The front end loader 
has also been a big help, both in trimming the low- 
er branches and also loading the brush after it is 
trimmed off. I feel this machine has put us years 
ahead of anything we could have done with the old 
methods in use before. 

I look back with satisfaction for what was 

accomplished in 1964, but I also look ahead at what 

could, and I hope will, be done as to beautifying 

the sides of the roads in the near future. 



109 



Health and Welfare 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Ab i g a i 1 Av e r y 

Pierre Dreyfus, M. D. 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D # , Chairman 



With the reelection of Mrs. Stuart Avery in 
March, 1964, the Board of Health met and elected 
her as Secretary. Mrs. David Garrison was re- 
appointed to the office of Agent; Mr. William Davis, 
Burial Agent; Dr. Alden Russell, Inspector of 
Slaughtering; and Mr. George Browning, Jr., In- 
spector of Animals. 

As in previous years, various inspections 
were made, including piggeries, restaurants, cider 
presses, stores, over-night cabins, rest homes, and 
nursery schools. The following licenses were 
granted: garbage transportation, 1; methyl alco- 
hol, 2; over-night cabins, 1; piggeries, 2; massage, 
1; victualers, 5; rest homes, 3; nursery schools, 3. 
With the development of the National Park on Route 
2, and the expansion of the Bedford Airport, one of 
the piggeries was closed, so that the Town now li- 
censes the one piggery supplied by the Town garbage 
collection system. The Board has also continued 
to review the various drainage and sewerage prob- 
lems created by the construction of new homes, and 
by the development of the various land sub-divisions 
proposed to the Planning Board. A total of 38 
permits were approved by the Board, of which 32 
were building permits for new homes, and 6 for al- 
terations and improvements. 1 sub-division was 
approved by the Board in 1964. 

As decreed by law, the following communicable 
diseases were reported: chicken pox, 127; German 
measles, 103; mumps, 59; strep throats and scarlet 
fever, 29; dog-bites, 8; whooping cough, 3. The 
three cases of whooping cough all occurred in one 



110 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



family. These children had not been inoculated 
against the disease, and the resulting school loss 
was one month. 

With the financial assistance of the Pierce 
Fund, several clinics were conducted. Dr. John 
Davies continued his able administration of the 
well-child conferences. These were held at 
monthly intervals and 83 children were seen: 6 in- 
fants under one year; 19 children from one to four 
years; and 58 children from five years and over. 
Many of these visits were for routine physical ex- 
aminations of five-year olds entering kindergarten. 
Small-pox vaccination, triple vaccine (diphtheria- 
tetanus -whoop ing cough) immunizations, and Sabin 
oral polio vaccine were given when needed. In 
October and November, Dr. William Tingey examined 
the teeth of all children in the grade schools. 
332 children were referred for treatment or ortho- 
dontia. This year all children were referred to 
private dentists, and none were in need of financial 
aid from the Pierce Fund. Lincoln is fortunate in 
having these expert, able men serve the Town. Fin- 
ally, on May 2nd at the Town Barn, 247 dogs were in- 
oculated against rabies. This represents less than 
5 0% of the dogs in Town, and with the increasing in- 
cidence of rabies found in bats in eastern Massa- 
chusetts, it behooves the townsfolk to protect them- 
selves by making certain that their dogs are in- 
oculated privately, if the Town clinic is not at- 
tended . 

The Pierce Fund also provided support to the 
Mental Health Program in the schools. This project 
is conducted under the able supervision of Mrs. 
Rogers, a social worker from the Walden Guidance 
Association in Concord. At her weekly visits to 
the various schools, consultations were had with 
teachers and parents to discuss behavioral problems 
in students. Consultations were held in 71 in- 
stances with teachers and 28 with parents; and 21 
children were referred to either the Walden Guidance 
Association or to private physicians for more inten- 
sive treatment or diagnosis. Both the principals 
and teachers of our schools believe this profession- 
al help of increasing importance to our Town health. 

Ill 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



The Board conducted a vaccination assistance 
program in the fall of the year. This was stimu- 
lated by the Middlesex Central District Medical 
Society, in collaboration with the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. Nine towns in the 
district medical society joined in an intensive 
immunization program to improve protection against 
diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, poliomyelitis, 
and small-pox. Clinics were held on Saturday 
mornings at the Smith School on September 26, Octo- 
ber 24, and November 21, and were staffed by Lin- 
coln doctors, nurses, and volunteers. 473 towns- 
folk attended the clinics and received a total of 
710 doses of various vaccines. A charge of 25<? 
per person was made to cover materials. It is the 
hope of the Board that those who did not attend will 
apply to their private physicans for protection 
against these diseases. 



The Emerson Hospital Nursing Service has con- 
tinued to provide effective home-nursing care, under 
Mrs. David Garrison's supervision. Because of ris- 
ing costs, it has been necessary to increase the 
charge for a home nurse to $4.00 per visit. The 
expense of the nurse's transportation for these home 
visits is met by the Board of Health. Presently 
this cost is 52£ per visit and is paid directly to 
the Hospital Nursing Service. Arrangements for 
these visits are made through Mrs. Garrison or by 
telephoning directly to the Emerson Hospital Nursing 
Service . 

The Board has become increasing- 
ly concerned with the need for public 
support of the Walden Child Guidance 
Clinic in Concord, run by the Walden 
Guidance Association. This Clinic 
serves the four towns of Concord, 
Lincoln, Carlisle and Acton, not only 
in providing diagnosis and treatment 
of children, but also emergency adult 
psychiatric care. Fees are paid by 
those using this Clinic, but these do 
not cover the high cost of such a service 
achusetts legislature has recently passed 
sive law making it possible for towns to appropriate 
funds in support of such mental health clinics. The 




The Mass 
permis- 



112 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



Board of Health is presenting an Article in the 
1965 Town Warrant for the Town's consideration. 

Another area of study this year has been the 
social service case work coverage in the Town. For 
some years many have felt, including Mrs. Garrison, 
several doctors and clergymen, that Lincoln has not 
had adequate resources to call upon, when needed. 
On the advice of a Town-wide committee, appointed 
by the Board to review the situation, the Northwest 
District of the Family Service Association of Great- 
er Boston, to whose support we contribute through 
the United Fund, has agreed to provide adequate 
coverage. This will include regularly scheduled 
time in Lincoln for a case worker. Inquiries should 
be channeled through Mrs. Garrison or directly to 
the Family Service Association. 

As in years past, the Board is deeply grateful 
to the many loyal volunteers who have given support 
at its several clinics, and especially to the de- 
pendable efforts of Mrs. Eleanor Tead . 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

George U. Browning, Jr. 

The following animals are under the rules and 
regulations of the Massachusetts Department of Agri 
culture, Department of Livestock Disease Control. 
I have given them a list of owners (or persons on 
whose premises the animals are kept) and the number 
and kinds of these animals in Lincoln, as follows: 



No. of dairy cows over 2 years 31 

No. of dairy cows 1-2 years 21 

No. of dairy cows under 1 year 6 

No. of bulls 1 

No. of beef cattle 43 

Total no. of horses 65 

Total no. of goats 11 

Total no. of sheep 31 

Total no. of swine 311 

Sixteen dog bites were reported during the 
year. Dogs are quarantined for ten days and re- 
leased if no sign of rabies appears. 

113 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

M. Elizabeth Causer, Director 



The first responsibility of the public assist- 
ance agency is to meet the basic needs of individ- 
uals who are themselves unable to meet them, and, 
by providing necessary services, to assist persons 
in developing their capacity for sel f -maintenance 
to the fullest extent possible for them. 

The following Federal and State aided pro- 
grams are now available to those in need: 

Old Age Assistance - under which cash allow- 
ances are provided for elderly persons who are in 
need. In order to be eligible for assistance, a 
person must be 65 years of age or over. 

Medical Assistance for the Aged - under which 
medical care is provided for persons 65 years of age 
or over whose income and resources are insufficient 
to meet the costs of necessary medical services. 

Disability Assistance - under which assistance 
is provided for needy persons found to be permanent- 
ly and totally disabled. In order to be eligible 
for assistance a person must be 18 years of age or 
over . 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children - under 
which cash allowances are provided for children who 
are living in a home maintained by their father, 
mother or other relative when death, long term ill- 
ness, or some other factor has deprived the child of 
the normal support or care of either his father or 
mother . 

Persons not eligible in any of the above cat- 
egories are provided for under General Relief. This 
program is not Federally aided. 

During the year 1964 the following cases were 



114 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



aided in the amount of $27,345.00. 

0. A. A. 9 

M. A. A. 9 

D. A. 1 

A. D. F. C. 1 

G. R. 2 

Federal and State receipts in support of 
these programs were $21,750.00. 



115 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 

Warren R. Dwyer , Vice-Chairman and Clerk 

David L. Garrison 

Morton B. Braun 

Robert L. Allen 



The Board organized on March 23, 1964, with 
two new members, Mr. Morton B. Braun and Mr. 
Robert L. Allen. Mr. Wales was elected chairman 
and Mr. Dwyer vice-chairman and clerk. The 
Board expressed its appreciation for the services 
of Mr. Constantin A. Pertzoff, retiring after five 
years, and Mrs. Edith M. Henderson, retiring after 
three years. Both made significant contributions 
to Lincoln through their service on the Board. 
Mrs. Elizabeth J. Snelling continues as secretary. 
But for her, the Board would accomplish much less 
at far greater difficulty. 

During 1964 the Board established the custom 
of meeting twice monthly, on the second and fourth 
Mondays . 



A. PLANNING POLICIES 

Under the statutes the Planning Board is 
charged with making studies of the Town's needs 
and preparing plans for the best use of its re- 
sources, as well as being assigned with the ad- 
ministration of subdivision control. During 1964, 
the Board was able to spend more of its time on 
its planning functions than has been true in pre- 
vious years, thanks to the services of the execu- 
tive secretary. 

In making its plans and recommendations, the 
Board sets policies in accordance with its under- 



116 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



standing of what is suitable for the Town and de- 
sired by its citizens. The following is an at- 
tempt to articulate these policies. 

1. Character of the Town. The existing 
low-density pattern of development of the Town 
and the topography of the land establish a semi- 
rural physical character although the prevailing 
land use is residential. The Board believes that 
a valid and desirable pattern of development for 
the Town is one that maintains as far as possible 
its rural characteristics through low overall den- 
sity of development and preservation of connected 
open space areas for conservation, recreation and 
esthetic purposes. 

2. Role of Planning. Never has the need 
been greater for Lincoln to plan well. In main- 
taining a physical and cultural environment that 
is unique for its proximity to Boston, Lincoln 
must have a positive approach to its future. If 
the Town simply reacts as events in the metropoli- 
tan area affect it, Lincoln will not preserve its 
character. Through planning, however, Lincoln 
can evolve in ways consistent with its aspira- 
tions and valuable to the metropolitan area of 
which it is a part. 

3. Open Spac e . Open space may well be- 
come the most valuable resource of this century. 
Its conservation is important. The existence of 
large connected tracts of open land of all kinds - 
woods, fields and swamps - has been an outstanding 
characteristic of Lincoln. Most of this open 
land is privately held; the use made of it by the 
Town's citizens for recreation, conservation and 
the simple enjoyment of beholding it, has existed 
only by the courtesy and generosity of its private 
owners. We believe that if the Town is to con- 
tinue to enjoy these benefits in the face of rising 
land values, a reasonable minimum of such land 
must be acquired by the Town or its semi-public 
agencies. Opportunities for such land acquisi- 
tion will be substantially gone within ten years; 
in fact, we may have as few as five years in which 
to secure the Town's needs. A land acquisition 
program coordinating the requirements of conserva- 

117 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



tion, recreation and land reserve for future Town 
uses can result in immediate benefit for the pres 
ent and an irreplaceable heritage for the future. 



4. 



Subd ivis ions . By its rules 



lations the Board r 
of construction int 
facilities can be e 
Town and that the n 
and safety in their 
strengthened aspect 
requirement that al 
with town water mai 
that provision be m 
alarm system into t 



equires subdivision 
ended to ensure that 
conomically maintain 
ew residents enjoy c 
neighborhood. A r 
of these regulation 
1 new subdivisions b 
ns for fire protecti 
ade for extension of 
hem . 



and regu- 
s tandar ds 

the added 
ed by the 
onvenience 
ecently 
s is the 
e supplied 



on 



and 



the fire 



B. ACTIVITIES 

1 . Town Finance and Land Use Survey . The 
t with the State Department of Com- 
rvey under its professional planning 
executed on April 7, 1964, and is 
on the anniversary of that date. A 
survey report appears as a separate 
s town report. This board expects 
t's economic analysis tools will pro- 
wi'th a basis for making policy de- 
li land use questions as open space 
ommercial or industrial zoning, or 
ot size requirements, with better 
he probable economic effects of these 



Town * s contrac 
merce for a su 
assistance was 
to be complete 
summary of the 
section of thi 
that the repor 
vide the Town 
cisions on sue 
acquisition , c 
variation of 1 
knowledge of t 
dec is ions . 



2. Cluster Zoning . Since the adoption of 
the cluster zoning provision within the Town's 
zoning by-law at the 1964 Annual Town Meeting, 
one cluster subdivision has been approved. One 
other plan was handled on the conventional 2-acre 
basis, because, in the Board's judgment, the appli 
cation of cluster zoning was inappropriate. 

3. General Residence District . Settle- 
ment of the status of Ridge Road by the agreement 
between Robert M. Malloy and the Town, ratified 

at the October 13th special town meeting, has per- 



118 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



mitted some plans for developing part of the 
general residence district to proceed. It ap- 
pears possible that two separate developments in 
that area may start within the year. 

Because of its un f am il iar i t y with multiple 
unit residence developments and because of the 
unusual topography of the site and the present 
development pattern, the Board believed that good 
professional advice was essential. It therefore 
retained the services of Max Mason, landscape 
architect, to work out a basic plan for the de- 
velopment of the area. The Board has been meet- 
ing with residents and developers of the area to 
ensure acceptance of the general features of its 
plan . 

4. Business Area. There is growing need 
for commuter parking in the business area. The 
Planning Board is undertaking a study of the de- 
sign of specific parking areas on the southwest 
side of the tracks and in the Ridge Road area. 

5. Neighboring Towns. The Board held 
joint meetings with the Concord and Weston Plan- 
ning Boards. These meetings were highly pro- 
ductive of understanding of mutual problems and 
have produced some worthwhile agreements on policy. 

6 . Metropolitan Area Planning Council. The 
Board recommends that Lincoln join the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council. This membership, at nom- 
inal financial cost, would keep us better in- 
formed on a wide range of planning projects being 
undertaken by this body, and would add Lincoln's 
voice to those of many other towns, including 
several close neighbors, in establishing policies. 

7. DiPerna Land Study. A study was con- 
ducted during the year of the recreational uses 
and development of the DiPerna land. The work 
was performed by a committee of two Planning 
Board members and several citizens of the Town. 

8. Dump Location. The Board has been 
studying a dump location and has been attempting to 
develop a plan that is logically related both to the 



119 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



existing road system and to prospective road 
r el ocat ions . 

9. Bicycle Paths . The Board is grateful 
to the League of Women Voters for undertaking a 
study of the feasibility of off-road paths in the 
interest of public safety. The conclusions 
reached by the League are under study by the 
Board and it is hoped that action on this prob- 
lem will be possible during the year. 

10. Statistical Summary. A cluster sub- 
division by the Wes-Lex Corporation, which divided 
approximately 18 acres of land on Tower Road into 
8 lots, was approved by the Board during 1964. 

Preliminary subdivision plans received during 
the year were: 

Swiedler Building Corporation, about 36 acres 
of land at the Weston-Lincoln town line, into 15 
lots . 

John E. Moore, Trustee, Emerson Realty Cor- 
poration, approximately 3.5 acres of land off 
Goose Pond Road, into 3 lots, all of which are 
almost entirely in Concord. 

Winthrop Harrington, Jr., approximately 15.5 
acres of land on Tower Road, into 7 lots. (This 
plan was later withdrawn as a subdivision.) 

11 . Meeting with Architects and Planners. 
A meeting was held in December to which archi- 
tects, landscape architects and planners resident 
in the Town were invited for an exchange of ideas. 
Many imaginative and constructive ideas were ex- 
pressed. The Board is always responsive to sug- 
gestions and recommendations, both as to specific 
detail activities and as to general Town objectives, 
that any citizen may bring to its attention. 



120 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



LAND USE 
AND 

TOWN FINANCE STUDY 



SUMMARY REPORT 



MARCH. 1965 



The preparation of this report 
was financed in part through 
an urban planning grant f ran 
the Housing and Home Finance 
Agency, under the provisions 
of Section 701 of the Housing 
Act of 195^ » as amended. 



122 



I INTRODUCTION 

A. There has been a need for improving understanding of the long- 
range consequences of new approaches to zoning, land acquisi- 
tion, financial and other major concerns of the Town, This 
need led both the Board of Selectmen and the Planning Board 

to develop a means of increasing the ability of the Boards and 
of the Town to make more knowledgeable decisions with broad 
perspective. 

In the latter part of 19^2, after joint considerations, the 
Boards agreed that a comprehensive study in depth to follow 
up and up-date the Braun-31iot Report of 1953 and to provide 
sound data for land use and town finance policies was highly 
desirable. At the Annual Town Meeting in 1963, the Town 
voted funds so that professional help could be obtained and 
additional money through Section 701 planning assistance funds 
be granted . 

B. The firm of Adams, Howard & Oppermann of Cambridge, long 
distinguished in the planning field, was selected. The 
direction of the study on behalf of the Town was through a 
steering committee composed of two representatives appointed 
by each Board. A significant contribution to the work was 
provided by three committees of citizens which studied 
probably land use patterns and developed basic data for use 
in the study. These committees were the residential, 
commerical-industrial, and conservation-recreation. Approx- 
imately thirty Lincoln citizens participated in the study. 
To them we extend our sincerest gratitude. 

C. In April of this year the final report of this study, which 
will contain the results of land use and town finance study, 
a community facilities plan, a circulation study and a 1980 
land-use plan, will be completed and distributed. The report 
that folloxtfs is a summary of results and a condensation of 
the land use and town finance study only. We feel that it 

is more important to place this data in the hands of the 
town as early as possible rather than to wait until the final 
plan can be distributed. 

As agreed by the Boards for almost three years, the consult- 
ants 1 opinions and work relating to a possible connector 
road which might run from the Winter Street Bridge to 
Route 117 is solely the consultants 1 . The Town Boards and 
those involved in this report retain complete freedom to 
continue study of this matter and make such recommendations 
as may later seem wise to them, 

123 



D. The Planning Board and the Board of Selectmen join in 

presenting this summary report. It is our expectation that 
it will prove of value in making town policy decisions in 
1965 and in the years to come. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



PLANNING BOARD 



Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 
Russell Haden 
Harold Laws on 



R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 
Warren R. Dwyer 
David Garrison 
Morton B. Braun 
Robert Allen 



Edith M. Henderson, 

Steering Committee Secretary 



124 



II SUMMARY OF FINDINGS A::D R3C0MMSNDATI0NS 

A. LAND US2 AND TO' HI FINANCE STUDY 

Study is arranged to oermit comparison of numerous possible 
future land use patterns. This report examines specifically 
the implications of the alternatives involving the lowest and 
highest rates of growth. 

In general: 

1. A continuation of present zoning policy and slow rate of 
growth would not put an unreasonable burden on taxpayer. 

2. Any substantial industrial development under conditions 
protecting town character would have a major favorable 
impact on tax revenue. 

3. Cost of conservation program relative to total budget is 
small enough, and significance of program in terms of 
preservation of open space and provision of recreation 
opportunities is great enough, to encourage support for 
immediate development of medium-range program, and would 
not exclude possibility of high range program involving 
up to 2000 acres. 

4. In general, hirher growth rate is likely to be somewhat 
more costly to individual taxpayer. However, cost impli- 
cations of this growth rate could vary considerably with 
additional provisions for higher density development. 
Ratio of costs to revenues could well be more favorable 
for such development than for same number of people under 
current single family pattern. 

5. School costs by far the most important factor in total 
cost of Town government. Any shifts here in level of 
service or increase in state aid would alter property tax 
picture considerably. 

6. Major factor in revenue picture (apart from industrial 
developments) is value of new housing. Again shifts here 
would have major impact on tax picture. 

7. Calculations in report based on assumed continuation of 
present assessment policies. Comparison of figures for 
existing and future develooment suggests importance of 
establishing equitable procedures for assessing all 
property. 



125 



B. CIRCULATION 

1. Continued preference for northerly location of Route 2, as 
first recommended in Braun-Eliot Report and subsequently 
supported in Consultants 1 Memorandum of July, 1963. Least 
disruption of existing land uses and least physical 
division of the Town. 

2. Construction of Route 117 connector in conjunction with an 
easterly extension of Winter Street in Waltham would create 
a northerly by-pass for Main Street and provide a more con- 
venient route across Route 128 for traffic between Route 
117 and core cities and towns. Would also improve access- 
ibility to Route 128 for northbound traffic from Route 117. 
Most logical location runs south of Lincoln-Weston line, 
leaving present 117 at point east of Merriam Street. No 
evidence that such a connector would have an adverse 
effect on Lincoln's traffic patterns. 

3. No major improvement of Old County Road. 

4. Development of Route 126 - 62 connector road important to 
Lincoln circulation system. 

5. No other major circulation improvements needed. Minor 
improvements in alignment and width should preserve 
existing physical character as much as possible. 



126 



Ill LAND USE AND TOWN FINANCE STUDY 

A. PAST GROWTH AND EXISTING CONDITIONS 

1. Land Use 

Gradual change from farming community to semi-rural residen- 
tial. Still much open land, enough so that character of 
Town could change rapidly if use of that land departed from 
pattern of recent years. 



EXISTING LAND USE 



Acres % of Total 



Residence 1 2640 28.1 

Commercial 45 *5 

Institutional & Open Space 



Town Buildings & Grounds 


160 


1.7 


Conservation Zone 


180 


1.9 


Land Conservation Trust & 


50 


.5 


Conservation Commission 
Regional and Private 






1660 


17.7 


Other 






Major Roads-^ 


360 


3.3 


Proposed Routes 2 & 2A 


260 


2.3 


Railroad 


60 


.6 


Undeveloped Land 


3985 


42.4 



9400 100.0 

•J 

Includes undeveloped lots in subdivisions and other recorded 

lots. 

Major uses involved: Hanscom Field (430), Minute Man Park 
(3^0), Cambridge Reservoir (300), Drumlin Farm (190), 
Farrington Memorial (80), Walden Pond (50), Storrow House 
(20), other major water bodies (250). 

3 Minor Streets are included in other land use tabulations. 



127 



2. Rate of Growth 

Last recorded population (i960) - 3930. Current population 
estimated from street lists - 4300. Modest rate of growth 
since early f 50 f s. 

INCREASE 



YEAR 


POPULATION 


i 


1940 


1783 




1945 


1998 





12.0 

1950 2427 21.5 

1955 2949 19.9 

I960 3930 29.6 

1964 4300(estimated) 9.4 
Source: Federal and State Census Reports 

Estimates for non-census years, prepared by Lincoln Planning 
Board based on ratio of street list population; March 1963 
and subsequently updated. 

Growth rate based on 5^-64 period (3»5^/ vr ») would yield 
1980 population of 6900. The higher f 55- f 60 figure is due 
in part to the building precipitated by anticipation of the 
1955 zoning change to a 2 acre minimum lot size. 

3. Age Composition 

Change is pattern common to suburban areas - increased 
significance of younger age groups. Number of persons over 
65 has increased very slightly, not as fast as total 
population. Major fact to be noted is high percentage of 
school -age children enrolled in Lincoln schools. Over 95 : ^ 
for elementary grades, 80^ for high school, in I960, Figures 
attest to quality of the school system, and emphasize the 
importance of this factor in choice of place of residence. 

School enrollment in grades K - 8 as per cent of total 
population increased from 15. 6t in 1950. to 22.8~£ in i960. 
Estimated 1964 figure is 22.9^. High School enrollment 
as percent of total population was 4.7$ in 1959 1 estimated 
at 6.1% in 1964. 



128 





1964 

3985 

5 365' \ 

\ :'••■. ■.■.-/V2050-.&* 
DEVELOPED LAND 












1980 

LOW HIGH 

/ 254 ° \ i/^^M\ 

( 4? 7^ -V- ■■■ ■k-rr r ~rg ( 5 375t '"t(';^^>/i^i 

\l ' ' ■''!*<•' U » ^^ ^^ ■ h \ is 

"low" combines lowest "high" combines highesi 
range of the three range of the three 
land use categories land use categories 




Residential, Commercial, Industrial , Circulation 
Institutional and Open Space 




ALL FIGURES BASED ON 
TWO-ACRE ZONING 


UNDEVELOPED LAND 




TOTAL AREA 9400 ACRES. 


COMPARATIVE LAND UTILIZATION 

THOUSANDS 
in 




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8_ 










































































































































































































































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r^ 1 




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4. 

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1950 I! 

c 


355 19 

OMPARATI\ 
TOWN 01 


60 IS 

fE POPUL/ 
- LINCOLN 


165 19 

VTION GRO 
195 


70 19 

WTH RATE 
- 1980 


75 I98C 

s 



129 



PUPILS 


3000 






















































0: 




HIGH 
RATE 

LOW 




































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a£ 


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$f 


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2000 


































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RATE 






























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300 






















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100 
























































1955 I960 1965 1970 1975 1980 


COMPARATIVE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS 


TOWN OF LINCOLN 1958-1980 



130 



AGE COMPOSITION 





1950 






I960 


No. 


1 


Are 


No. 


4 


281 


11.6 


0-4 


430 


12.2 


429 


17.6 


5-14 


945 


24.0 


133 


5.7 


15-19 


269 


6.9 


26? 


11.0 


20-29 


25°, 


6.6 


539 


24.3 


3<M*4 


922 


23.5 


481 


19.8 


45-64 


780 


19.3 


242 


10.0 


65+ 


276 


7.0 



2427 100.0 3930 100.0 

Source: I960 U. S. Census of Housing and Population, 
Advance Table PH-1 -Population and Housing 
Characteristics. Fibres exclude Air Ease 
Population. 

4. Physical Setting 

Unique natural resources of Lincoln well documented in 
Braun-Eliot Report. The existence of such resources so 
close to the center of a major metropolitan area is unusual; 
suggests that preservation of these characteristics may have 
significance for the whole metropolitan land use pattern as 
well as for the residents of the Town. 



B. DEVELOPMENT OF LAND USE ALTERNATIVES 
1. Organization and General Procedures 

a. Full consideration of all land use alternatives, indepen- 
dent of economic impact, initially with proposals for 
each land use category developed separately. Steering 
Committee to make final selection of combinations for 
economic evaluation. 

b. Above program changed in final report somewhat. Struc- 
ture permits examination of economic impact of any com- 
bination of alternatives, but alternatives were selected 
for report partly to illustrate methodology and partly 

as step to proposed Future Land Use Plan. 



131 



c. Attempt made at outset to set up uniform operating pro- 
cedures for all three Study Committees. First meetings 
indicated that different requirements for each Committee 
necessitated three different approaches. 

d. Each committee concerned to varying degree with: 

- development of criteria for selecting land for each 
range or alternative 

- examination of feasible limits to alternatives 

- examination of key issues related to land use in 
question 

- final selection of alternatives 

- evaluation of results by consultants and outside 
experts. 

e. Work of each committee described briefly below. Specific 
alternatives summarized at end of this section. 

2. Residential Study Committee 

a. Criteria for selecting land - decided that no future allo- 
cations of land could be made. No major location factors 
applicable in Lincoln situation and too hazardous to pre- 
dict timing of availability of large tracts for develop- 
ment. Therefore, work only with figures for total 
population and variations in density of development. 

b. Limits to future growth set at projection of past growth 
rate at low end and full utilization of open land at other, 
but to include possible changes in density of development. 

c. Higher density development - two key questions: economic 
range to be provided for, and development of design con-^ 
trols for review of future proposals. 

- survey of Town employees was mixed success but did 
suggest that some demand exists for low rent units 
($100 - $125 per month) 

- total number of high density units not likely to 
be high under any circumstances 

- approach taken for South Lincoln General Residence 
Area provides good example of review procedures which 
should be followed 

- general agreement that any major shifts in economic 
make-up of Town not a matter which zoning can handle. 



132 



Houses on one acre lots not likely to be much less 
expensive than two acre houses, and rental housing 
would not necessarily be at low rates. Provisions of 
lover cost rental housing would need to cone as part 
of other policy decisions. 

3. Recreation-Conservation Study Committee 

a. Consideration of purposes served by program of open space 
preservation: 

- reservation of sites for future use by Town 

- preservation of wetlands, drainare areas 

- conservation of natural resources 

- scenic view, enjoyment of natural world 

- identify and preserve history of the Town - houses 
and farms. 

b. Identified all parcels which mirht be involved, based on 
above criteria. 

c. Set up system for ranking the parcels. Criteria: 

- contribution to conservation of natural resources 

- size, location and accessibility of parcel for 
proposed use 

- suitability for possible use for organized recreation 

- preservation of scenic, historical and educational 
resources, including working farm lands 

- contribution to conservation of human resources 
through provision for aesthetic, physical and social 
needs 

- suitability for municipal needs. 

d. Derive high, middle, and low ranges. High range basically 
contains all desirable pieces; middle range approximately 
what is currently contemplated. 

e. Each piece ranked for land quality for purpose of esti- 
mating acquisition cost. Areas judged suitable for either 
cluster development or conservation zoning were subtracted 
from total area to be acquired. Cost of acquiring balance 
estimated at $3,000 per acre for good (high and dry land), 
$2,000 per acre for average land, and $1,000 per acre for 
poor (swampy) land. Estimated 50$ of resultant total from 
state and federal aid and gifts. Balance spread over 20 
year bonding period beginning in I965 , for all three 



ranges. 



133 



4, Industrial-Commercial Study Committee 

a. Definition of limits of feasibility: 

- for commercial - only local service uses in South 
Lincoln area or service uses related to Minute Man 
Park. No new local business areas or major regional 
facility. 

- for industry - research and development firms; con- 
straint placed on water consumption. As general rule 
water consumption should not greatly exceed the 
probable level of consumption on land in question 

if residential development occurred. Criteria for 
selection - size of parcel, isolation to preserve 
Town character, access to roads (access to rail not 
considered important here) 

b. Five areas selected and discussed with knowledgeable 
persons. Final alternatives include only three parcels: 

- Virginia Road area north of Park 

- Area between future Routes 2 and 2A, west of Mill 
Street 

- Area between future Routes 2 and 2A, east of Mill 
Street . 

c. Opinion of industrial developers consulted is that parcels 
2 and 3 ro&y be marketable in a few years, while parcel 1 
has limited appeal. 

5. Summary of Alternatives Selected 

a. General information 

- Land for residential development : 

land classified as Residence in Existing Land Use 
Table includes about 150 existing buildable lots. 
Conservation proposals include areas for cluster 
development sufficient to accommodate 250 houses. 
As of 1964: 2640 acres in residential use, 3985 acres 
of open developable land, 1048 houses. These figures 
reflect full impact of Minute Man Park. 
Future population figured at 4 persons p^r house. 



134 



Industrial Developnent 

Assumed existence of new Routes 2 and 2A, as proposed 
herein, and existing zoning standards. Selection of 
possible sites cruided by limitation that development 
not be detrimental to the open character of the Town. 

Recreation-Conservation Lands 

Although suitability for recreational use was one of 
the criteria used, no attenpt made to identify speci- 
fic sites for particular uses. 

Low and middle ranges derived from hi r eliminating 
entirely areas not highly ranked and by cuttin- back 
area of major oarcels where this did not defeat 
reasons for its selection, e.?., if piece was selected 
to provide access to water for boat launching, the 
water frontage was not eliminated in an- r ran^e. 



135 



Ill B. 5. Summary of Alternatives Selected 





b. Residential Dev 


elopment Alt 


ernatives 






No. 


Description 


Population 


Houses 


Land Utilization 


Res. Acreage 
Added 


1. 


Low Growth Rate 


1970 


1980 


1970 


1980 




1970 


1980 














a. 


20 houses/yr, 
2 acre zoning 


4700 


5500 


1170 


1370 


320 homes, 257.(80) 
on existing lots, 
100 houses in clus- 
ter areas. Balance 
- 140 at 2 acres 
plus 20% = 340 


140 


340 


b. 


30 houses/yr, 
2 acre zoning 


5000 


6200 


1230 


1530 


480 homes, 207.(100) 
on existing lots, 
140 houses in clus- 
ter areas. Balance 
- 240 at 2 acres 
plus 207. - 580 


230 


580 


2. 


Medium Growth 
Rate 
















a. 


40 houses/yr, 
2 acre zoning 


5200 


6800 


1290 


1690 


640 homes, 120 on 
existing lots, 180 
in cluster areas. 
Balance - 340 at 2 
acres plus 207. 
- 820 acres 


330 


820 


b. 


40 houses/yr, 
1 acre zoning 


5200 


6800 


1290 


1690 


640 homes, 120 on 
existing lots, 180 
in cluster areas. 
Balance - 340 at 1 
acre plus 207«f410 


160 


410 


3. 


High Growth 
Rate 
















a* 


60 houses/yr, 
2 acre zoning 


5700 


8100 


1410 


2010 


960 homes, 140 on 
existing lots, 200 
in cluster areas. 
Balance - 620 at 2 
acres plus 207. 
= 1490 acres 


600 


1490 


b. 


60 houses/yr, 
1 acre zoning 


5700 


8100 


1410 


2010 


960 homes, 140 on 
existing lots, 200 
in cluster areas. 
Balance - 620 at 1 
acre plus 207. 


300 


740 


4. 


General Res. 










- 740 acres 

5 f am/acre plus 207.. 






Probable maximum of 




Developments 


300 units under any 
circumstances 


75 units planned in 
present zone 







136 



Ill B. 5. Summary of Alternatives Selected 



c. Recreation - Conservation Alternatives 



Total Acreage Proposed 


Low Range 


Middle Range 


High Range 


863 


1295 


1861 


Cluster Areas, Buildable 


328 


373 


37 3 


Portion 








Acres open space 


535 


922 


1488 


Conservation zone 


83 


249 


468 


Net Acres to be 


452 


67 3 


1020 


Acquired 








COST - 
Good Land ($3000/acre) 


Acres 


$ 


Acres 


$ 


Acres 


$ 


231 


69 3,000 


265 


795,000 


368 


1,104,000 


Fair Land ($2000/acre) 


174 


348,000 


253 


506,000 


37 2 


744,000 


Poor Land ($1000/acre) 
Total Estimated Cost 


47 


47,000 


155 


155,000 


280 


280,000 


$1,088,000 


$1,456,000 


$2,128,000 


Net Cost (507. of total 


544,000 


728,000 


1,014,000 


met by state and fede- 








ral aid and gifts) 








Annual Payments - 


1st yr-$46,240 


1st yr-$61,900 


1st yr-$86,200 


20 year bonding at 


dec. $950/yr 


dec. $1270/yr 


dec. $1770/yr 


3.57., beginning in 


1970 - $41,490 


1970 - $55,600 


1970 - $77,400 


1965 


1980 - $31,990 


1980 - $42,900 


1980 - $59,600 



Note: The acreage figures in this table differ slightly from 

the final figures prepared by the Recreation-Conservation 
Study Committee, due to the handling of cluster areas. 
If a parcel was considered suitable for cluster develop- 
ment, it was included intact for all ranges, except for 
some reduction in the low range. The total acreage 
figures therefore include the buildable portions of the 
cluster sites. The figures for "acres of open space" 
give the best comparison of the magnitude of the three 
ranges. 



137 



Ill B. 5. Summary of Alternatives Selected 



d. Industrial - Commercial Alternatives 



Parcel 



Location 



Kennedy land - south- 
east corner Winter St. 
and Old County Rd. 

Off Conant Rd. - 
southeast corner of 
Town 

Area between proposed 
Routes 2 and 2A west 
of Mill St. 

Area between proposed 
Routes 2 and 2A east 
of Mill St. 

Bedford Flats - west 
of Virginia Rd., north 
of Minute Man Park 

South Lincoln Business 
Area 



Gross Acres 



15 



60 



80 



50 



60 



Acres Developed 



Low 



Com. 



Ind. 



Middle 



Com. 



Ind. 



20 



30 



Hi 



&h 



Com. 



Ind. 



10 



10 



40 



40 



40 



TOTALS 



13 



50 



25 



120 



Notes : 



1. Parcels 1 and 2 eliminated from any consideration after 
discussions with land developers. 

2. Parcels 3 and 4 contain some minor additions from Cambridge 
Reservoir land. 

3. Commercial expansion for local service uses limited to 
South Lincoln area. Amount open, but 5 acres judged to 
be upper limit. 



138 



C. ECONOMIC DATA - SOURCES A.iD METHODOLOGY 

1. ^iasic procedure was to use '57 - f '3 period as basis for 
orojectinr' future costs, with adjustments made wherever more 
detailed estimates possible. 

)\o assumptions made without some firm knowledge of changing 
conditions, e.r., no additional revenues from state aid, 
assessment projections based on current system, no assumption 
about changes in price levels. 

2. Costs 

a. Data developed from f 57 - '63 Town Reports. 

b. Figured in constant 19-^3 dollars, inflation factor removed. 

c. All accounting items (Hanscom School ooeration, temporary 
loans, stabilization fund, employee insurance) eliminated, 
so dealing with actual exoenditures. 

d. Because of problem of allocating revenues to specific 
department accounts, all non-property tax revenues con- 
sidered together. Therefore all costs are gross. Excep- 
tion is hi°-h school; since this is actually a separate 
governmental jurisdiction net costs can readily be deter- 
mined. Cost figured on net basis for high school only. 

e. For each department procedure was as follows: 

- establish '57 - '63 pattern and adjust for any 
unusual conditions not likely to recur 

- check to see if figures adequately reflect quality 
changes in line with desires of citizenry 

- school costs, most important factor in total picture, 
reviewed closely b ,r both elementary and high school 
suoerintendents and other school officials. Other 
figures reviewed by Town Hall personnel 

- develop variations for soecific alternatives. 

3. Revenues 

a. Again used ' 57 - '-? neriod as basis, corrected to deal 
with constant dollars. 

b. Won -property tax revenues - consistent relationship 
between total costs and non-property tax revenues. 
Figured at 35,- of total cost for all alternatives. 

139 



Assessed value for r 64 broken into components - residen- 
tial land and buildings, commercial land and buildings, 
open land, personal property. These figures used as base 
for all alternatives. Certain that value of this base 
will increase, but no sound way to project amount. Full 
Impact of Minute Man Park subtracted. 



d. Personal Property projected separately based on average 
annual increase in valuation since f 57. Utilities are 
major factor here. 

e. u alue of Undeveloped Land - currently assessed value 
averages $90 per acre. Each acre subtracted figured at 
that amount. 

f . estimate of value of new residential construction based 
on assessed values of most recently completed houses. 
Developed land values from same source. Some adjust- 
ment made after discussions with realtors, particularly 
with regard to the likely value of housing built on 
smaller lots. 

<r. Commercial and Industrial Development - 1958 study of 
development along Route 128 derived figures of average 
investment of $3.39 per square foot, $2.29 for land 
and building, $1.10 for equipment. Unless manufacturing 
involved, latter amount would be taxable as personal 
property. Assessed value figured at Yi\- of above 
figures, in *6j $. 

4. Methodology 

a. Determine all costs associated with particular residen- 
tial alternative. Add costs for conservation and indus- 
trial alternatives selected. 

b. Project assessed valuation for residential base, subtract 
impact on open land from development and conservation 
program, add impact from industrial-commercial alterna- 
tive. Subtract for non-property tax revenues at 35 ' of 
total cost (minus high school). 

c. Compute implied tax rate based on net revenues and 
assessed value. Compute tax revenue per house and 
total cost per capita. 

d. Diagram of study methodology shown on following page. 



140 



METHODOLOGY: LAND USE & TOWN FINANCE SURVEY 



BASIC CONDITIONS: EXISTING & FUTURE 



POPULATION 



NUMBER & TYPE OF 
DWELLING UNITS 



LOT SIZES 



COMMERCIAL 
DEVELOPMENT 



INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT 



ACRES OF 
OPEN LAND 



OPEN SPACE 
PROGRAM 



ASSESSED 
VALUE 



I C 3 and III C.6 



INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL 
PROPERTY 



OPEN LAND 



RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTY 



PERSONAL 
PROPERTY 



1980 LAND US E 
ALTERNATIVE 



DERIVED 
TAX RATE 



"5 REVENUE PER HOUSE 



! TOTAL COST PER CAPITA 5. 



SCHOOL 
OPERATING 



NON-SCHOOL 
OPERATING 



SCHOOL 

CAPITAL 



NON-SCHOOL 
CAPITAL 




LESS 



NON- PROPERTY TAX 
REVENUES 



REVENUES FROM 
PROPERTY TAXES 



Ill C. 5. Tabular Summary of Costs 



a. Operating Costs - Non-school Expenditures 



Department 



•57- S3 Pattern (63$) 



Basic 1980 Figure 



Quality Increments j 
All Ranges 



1 . General 

Governmt 
1.1 Gen. Govt. 



1.2 Other 



2. Protect . 
of Per- 
sons & 
Property 

2.1 Police 



2.2 Fire 



2,3 Other 



3. Highways 



4. Recreation 



5. Library 



Increase of 
.37/cap/yr. 



Increase of 
.48/cap/yr. 



'6>$10.90; plus .30/ 
cap/yr. 

" '70 - $13.00/cap 
'80 - $16.00/cap" 



, 6>$33.30; plus 
.50/cap/yr. 
- '70 - $36.80/cap 
'80 - $41.80/cap 



Increase of 
.23/cap/yr. 



Increase of 
.43/cap/yr. 



Increase of 
.15/cap/yr 



Salaries: 

Av.inc.'55-»6>9.37. 
Av.inc.'60-»63-4.67. 
Other expend! tures : 
Maint. & Construct: 
Av. »55-6>$53,200 
Maint. & Construct; 
$23,500 other. 
Also $16,000 for 
Park Dept. 
Increase of 
.08/cap/yr 



Increase of 
.85/cap/yr 



•6>$9.70; plus 
.25/cap/yr. 
" '70 - $11.45/cap 
'80 - $13.95/cap 



•6>$7.70; plus 

.60/cap/yr. 

" '70 - $11.90/cap 

'80 - $17.90/cap 
•6>$9.30; plus 
.15/cap/yr. 
" '70 - $10.35/cap 

'80 - $11.85/cap 
»6>$33,200; plus 
47./ yr - 
'70 - $42,500 
'80 - $55,800 



Maint. & Construct 

$53,200 

Other $40,000 



•6>$1.60; plus 
,1 5/cap/yr 
" '70 - $2.65/cap 
'80 - $4.15/cap 
• 63=$8.05+.85/cap/ yr 
■ ^70 - $1 4.00 /cap 



•57-'63 period re- 
flects some staff 
increase, but more 
is likely. Add ba- 
sic $10,000 to all 
ranges. 
None 



This includes re- 
placement of rolling 
stock. Add one man 
at $6,000 to re- 
flect general con- 
cern for traffic 
control. 
None 



None 



None 



None 
None 



Per cap. increase 
doubled based on 
demand indicated in 
Recreation Survey 



Non-School Total : 



Basic Figure 
♦70-$100/cap + $136,000 
•80-$128/cap + $149,000 



Including Increments 

♦70-$100/cap + $144,000 
»80-$128/cap + $165,000 



141 



III. C. 5. Tabular Summary of Costs 

a. (cont'd) Adjustments for Specific Alternatives 



Residential 



Department 



1. General Govt. 

1.1 Gen. Govt. 

1.2 Other 



2. Protection of 
Persons 6» Propty 

2.1 Police 

2.2 Fire 

2.3 Other 

3. Highways 



4. Recreation 

5. Library 



Low - 

Less than $6500 



None 
None 



None 

None 

None 
None 



Drop figure to 
$45,000 

None 

Add $10,000 
Deer, to .50/cap/yr 
after *68; 1980 - 
$18.30/cap 



Middle - 
$6500 - $7 500 



$10,000 for staff 
$20,000 for gen»l 
cost increases, 
such as garbage 
collection 



One man - $6,000 

One man - $6,000 

None 

57./ yr for 2 acre 

zoning (adds $6000 

no change for 

one acre 

None for 2 acre 

zoning, $45,000 

for one acre 

None 

Add $15,000 
None 



High - 

More than $7500 



$15,000 for staff 
similar $20,000 



Two men, one 

cruiser - $15,000 

Two men - $12,000 

None 

67. for 2 acre zon. 

(adds $11,000) 
Increase sigure to 
$60,000 for 2 acre 
zoning 

No change for 
1 acre 
None 

Add $20,000 
Increase to 
$1.00/cap/yr after 
•75; 1980 - 
$23.25/cap 



SUMMARY: 



Per 
Cap 



Addition 



Per 
Cap 



70 



$ 99 



$144,000 



$124 $167,000 



2 acre $100 



1 acre $100 



2 acre $123 



1 acre $123 



Addition 



Per 

Cap 



$169,000 



$164,000 



$100 



$228,000 



$100 
$129 



$214,000 



$129 



Addition 



$184,000 



$174,000 



$265,000 



$253,000 



Notes : No specific cost increments for General Residence. Figure cost 
at per capita figure for residential alternative used. 

Figures on preceding page are base costs, derived from • 57 - f 63 
experience with adjustments affecting all alternatives. Figures 
under Summary above contain specific adjustments for each alterna- 
tive; they form basis for subsequent cost calculations. 



142 



III. C. 5. Tabular Summary of Costs 

a. (cont'd) Adjustments for Specific Alternatives 



Department 


Conserve 


t i o n 


I 


n d u s t ] 


f y 


Low 


Middle 


High 


Low 


Middle 


High 


1. General Govt 
1.1 Gen. Govt. 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


1.2 Other 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


2. Protection of 


None 


None 


None 


None 


One man, 


Two men, 


Persons & Propty 


2.1 Police 












1 cruiser 
- $9,000 


1 cruiser 

- $15,000 


2.2 Fire 


None 


None 


None 


None 


One man, 
$6,000 


Two men, 
$12,000 


2.3 Other 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


3. Highways 


$10,000 
(Park De 


$15,000 
»pt. carri< 
Highways 


$25,000 
sd under 
) 


None 


$5,000 


$10,000 


4. Recreation 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


5. Library 

i , .. 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Increments : 


$10,000 


$15,000 


$25,000 


None 


$20,000 


$37,000 



143 



4-> 

CO 

O 
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144 



III. C. 5. Tabular Su/nmary of Costs 
c. Operating Costs - Schools 



Department 



'57 - '63 Pattern ($63) 



Basic 1930 Figure 



duality Increments 
'•11 Ranges 



6. Schools 
a. Elementary 



Increase of $31/pupil/yr 



b. High Sch. 



No set pattern - gener- 
ally a cycle based on 
new construction 



•63-S602; plus 
$31 per pupi 1 per 
year 

- '70 - $320/pupil 
•30 -$1130/pupil 

$750/pupil 



None 



None 



Note : 


Elem. costs 


are gross, high 
school net, so 


figures 


are not 


directl 
able. 


y compar- 
Net cost 


of elerr 


. schools 


roughl y 
able to 
1963 

High - 

Elem - 


cornpar- 
high sch: 

$650/pupil 
$435/pupil 



Enrollment 


Est. 7. of 




Total Pop. 


805 


21.0 


394 


22.8 


920 


22.8 


972 


23.5 


974 


23.0 


1006 


23.4 



Enrol lment 


Est. 7. of 




Total Pop 


180 


4.7 


209 


5.3 


227 


5.6 


240 


5.8 


247 


5.8 


263 


6.1 



Future school enrollments are developed from projections of school enroll 
ment as a percentage of total population. Past figures are as follows: 

Year K-8 Enrollment Est * 7 « of 9-12 

59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 

The following figures are used in the study: 

1970 1980 

Elementary 26.07. 24.07. 

High School 8.07. 8.07. 
These figures are in line with current projections of 1970 elementary 
school enrollment. The 8.07. figure for high school enrollment yields a 
1970 figure somewhat lower than current projections, but one which is in 
line with the likely age distribution of 1970 and 1980 populations. 

Enrollment from General Residence development figured at 1 student per 5 
dwelling units. 



145 



III. C.5. Tabular Summary of Costs 
d. Capital Costs - Schools 



Elementary School - costs figured as percent of operating costs. 

Current proposal will accommodate 1300 pupils. Figure additional construc- 
tion to meet levels of 1500, 1800, and 2200. Timing will of course vary for 

each alternative. 

Debt-to-operating cost ratio in '64 : 25.37.. This figure will decrease as 
costs go up and debt service down, but each new building will alter the 

pattern. 

Timing of new buildings varies with each alternative, so pattern of ratio 
would vary for each. But for purposes of study following figures are 
sufficient: 

1970 - Total School Debt at 18% of Total Costs 
1980 - Total School Debt at 12% of Total Costs 



Regional High School 

Currently Lincoln enrollment is 277, of total. Figure future Lincoln costs 
as follows: 

1970 - 25% of total 

1980 - 23% of total 

Total capital cost for Lincoln based on existing debt (Total 1970 - 
$155,600, 1980 - $51,900), plus amount for each new phase, based on projec- 
ted costs of current project (1st year net cost $108,100, decreasing by 
$3,800 each year). 



146 



6. Summary of Revenue Projections 

a. Assessed Value of Real Estate - 1964 

£ -i Acres 
Land 

Residential $ 1,776,600 14.2 I960 

Non-Residential 48,600 .4 45 

Open 478,500 3.8 5^30 

Buildings 

Residential 10,062,400 80.5 
Non-Residential 135,000 1.1 

Total $12,501,100 100.0 

Average assessed value per acre, Open Land - $90 
Average assessed value per house, land and buildings 
(excluding land assessed as open) - $11,300 

b. Assessed Value - Personal Property 

1964 figure - $1,079,530. 90$ of total accounted for 
by utilities (Boston Gas Co., Boston Edison, New 
England Tel. and Tel.). Remaining lOi has fluctuated 
with no discernible pattern over past five years. 
Increases for the utilities, ! 60 - f 64, averaged 
$30,000/year. Figures used in study - 

low residential - $30,000/yr. 

middle residential - $35,000/yr. 

high residential - $40,000/yr. 

c. Assessed Valuation - New Development 

- Residential (figures derived from most recent new 
construction and discussions with developers) 
Assessed value per 2 acre lot* $2200 
Assessed value per 1 acre lot 

in cluster development $2000 
in regular development $1800 
* For existing lots average of $2,000 was 

used, because some are less than two acres. 
Assessed value per house— $14,000 
Implied Cost Range: Assess. Rate Cost Range 

Land 20-25* ~$8,800 - $11,000 

Building 35-40^ 35,000 - 40.600 

Total $43,800 - $51,600 



147 



Garden Apartments 

Total value estimated at 100 months 1 gross rent, 
or 6f - 7 times gross annual rent (includes land). 
Assessed at 37|$- 

Industrial 

Figures derived from 1958 study of industrial develop- 
ment along Route 128, corrected to 19&3 dollars. 
Adjustments made after discussion with industrial 
land developers. Figures used: 

Investment /Acre 
Land and buildings - $84,000 
Equipment - 41,000 

Total - $125,000 

Unless manufacturing involved, the investment for 
equipment would be taxable as personal property. 

Commercial 

Investment per acre less applicable to commercial 
development. However, investment relative to that 
for industry would be higher. Also higher percent 
of total for equipment. Figures used in study: 

In vestment /Acre 
Land and buildings - $100,000 
Equipment - 50,000 

Total - $150,000 

For both commercial and industrial development 
assessed value figured at 37t^ °f total investment. 



148 



THOUSANDS 
OF DOLLARS 

4,500 



4,453,100 



4,000 



3,500 



3,000 



2,500 



2,000 



1,500 



1,000 



OPERATING 
CAPI TAL 



SCHOOL NON-SCHOOL 



W& 



■■■ ••:■»' 



753,500 



500 



# 




55% 



45% 



2,770,600 



2,347,500 
V/. 



1,418,500 











69% 



31% 



_ 




68% 



32% 




I 957 



963 



1970 
LOW HIGH 



1980 
LOW HIGH 



Note: LOW combines lowest range of the three land use categories. 
HIGH combines highest ronge of the three land use categories. 



COMPARATIVE PROJECTIONS OF COSTS 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 1957-1980 



149 



THOUSANDS 
OF DOLLARS 


40,000 












































1 1 1 

35,176,000- 


fft 
















































j$ 


^ 




30,000 










































jH^I 


■■ •■ .--' 


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4+ 


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A 


* 










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& 


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■* 


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I* 














v 


































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U, 328,200 


























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6,000 






































































































5,000 




















































v 


















































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1955 19 


60 1965 1970 IS 


75 I98C 


Note: Top line combines highest range of the three land use categories. 


Lower line combines lowest range of the three land use categories. 


Curve for 1956-63 fitted to new assessment base. 


1964 figure adjusted for full impact of Minute Man National Park. 




COMPARATIVE ASSESSED VALUE PROJECTIONS 


TOWN OF LINCOLN 1955-1980 

■ 



150 



D. APPLICATION TO SELECTED ALTERNATIVES 
1. General Procedure 

a. Material set up to permit analysis of numerous possible 
land use patterns, 

b. Purpose here is primarily to evaluate possibilities as 
part of the process of developing the Future Land Use 
Plan, to be contained in final report. Secondarily to 
illustrate how the model can operate. 

c. Current figures given to provide base for comparison. 

d. All figures in current dollars, no attempt made to 
project changes in price level. 



15 2 



III. D. 2. Summary Sheet - Economic Analysis 

a. Selected Alternatives - 1970 

(figures in thousands of dollars, except tax rate, 
revenue per house, and per capita cost) 





Total 


Amt .from 




Derived 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Total 


Alternatives 




Property 


Assessed 


Tax 


from Res. 


per 


Cost/ 




Cost 


Tax 


Value 


Rate 


Property 


house 


cap. 


1963 


1,418.5 


991.7 


12,719.8 


78 


874.4 


820 


335 


A. Low Residence 


2,298.0 


1,620.4 


16,646.8 


97 


1,429.1 


1160 


460 


With: 
















Low Conserv- 
















ation 
















Low Industry 


2,347.5 


1,652.6 


16,665.2 


99 


1,458.6 


1180 


470 


High " 


2,369.5 


1,666.9 


19,417.8 


86 


1,267.0 


1030 


47 5 


High Conserv. 
















Low Industry 


2,390.4 


1,680.5 


16,619.2 


101 


1,488.0 


1210 


480 


High " 


2,412.4 


1,694.8 


19,381.8 


87 


1,281.8 


1040 


480 


B.High Resid. 


2,656.2 


1,880.2 


19,005.6 


99 


1,688.0 


1200 


465 


With: 
















Low Conserv. 
















Low Industry 


2,705.7 


1,912.4 


19,014.0 


101 


1,722.2 


1220 


47 5 


High " 


2,727.7 


1,926.7 


21,776.0 


88 


1,500.5 


1060 


480 


High Conserv. 
















Low Industry 


2,748.6 


1,940.3 


18,978.0 


102 


1,7 39.2 


1230 


480 


High " 


2,770-6 


1,954.6 


21,740.6 


90 


1,534.6 


1090 


485 



Notes: 1963 Assessed Value figure based on current 
assessing practice. 

the combination of the 3 low ranges generally 
represents a continuation of recent trends and, 
with the exception of the conservation program, 
past policies on land development. 



153 



III. D. 2. Summary Sheet - Economic Analysis 

b. Selected Alternatives - 1980 

(figures in thousands of dollars, except tax rate, 
revenue per house, and per capita cost) 





Total 


Amt . from 




Derived Revenue 


Revenue 


Total 


Alternatives 




Property 


Assessed 


Tax 


from Res. 


per 


Cost/ 




Cost 


Tax 


Value 


Rate 


i Property 


house 


cap. 


1963 


1,418.5 


991.7 


12,719.8 


78 


874.4 


820 


335 


A. Low Residence 


3,240.9 


2,252.7 


21,747.6 


104 


2,034.1 


1330 


520 


With: 
















Low Conserv- 
















ation 
















Low Industry 


3,282.9 


2,280.0 


21,805.2 


105 


2,053.7 


1340 


530 


High » 


3,326.9 


2,308.6 


28,711.2 


80 


1,564.7 


1020 


535 


High Conserv. 
















Low Industry 


3,325.5 


2,307.7 


21,726.0 


106 


2,073.3 


1360 


535 


High " 


3,369.5 


2,336.3 


28,631.9 


82 


1,603.8 


1050 


545 


B.High Resid. 


4,324.5 


3,006.2 


28,292.0 


106 


2,727.5 


1360 


535 


With: 
















Low Conserv. 
















Low Industry 


4,366.5 


3,033.6 


28,349.8 


107 


2,753.2 


1370 


540 


High " 


4,410.5 


3,062.2 


35,255.2 


87 


2,238.6 


1110 


545 


High Conserv. 
















Low Industry 


4,409.1 


3,061.3 


28,270.6 


108 


2,778.9 


1380 


545 


High « 


4,453.1 


3,089.9 


35,176.0 


88 


2,264.3 


1130 


550 



Notes: 1963 Assessed Value figure based on current 
assessing practice. 

the combination of the 3 low ranges generally 
represents a continuation of recent trends and, 
with the exception of the conservation program, 
past policies on land development. 



154 



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158 



4. higher Density Development 

a. Two major factors leading to study: 

- current proposals for development of existing 
General Residence District - proposed develop- 
ment shows 75 units; Bylaw would permit 125 

- question of providing housing for Town employees, 
retired persons on fixed income, older persons 
desiring to remain in Lincoln without maintaining 
a single family home. 

b. Town Employee Survey: 

- 115 replies received. Findings indicate demand 
for apartments under $130 per month, but question 
of amount people would be willing to pay not 
adequately covered. Survey did not cover re- 
tired persons. 

c. Non-Economic Issues: 

- need to meet housing needs of specific -roups 
mentioned above 

- desirability of increased diversification of 
the population 

- these largely matters for Town determination - 
amount of housing likely to be involved not 
large enough to alter the general components 
of the Land Use Plan. 

d. Economic Issues: 

- School costs largest factor. Experience shows 
that impact on enrollment from apartments is 
considerably less than for same number of people 
housed in single family homes. 

- Cost comparisons: 

Example: 100 units S 3 persons/dwelling unit = 

300 persons 

1 school child/5 units = 20 pupils 
1930 costs to Town based on low residence 
alternative : 

Non-School $128/cap. = $38,^00 
School $1130/pupil = 22,600 

$61,000 



159 



- Investment 

Two rules of thumb indicate investment of 6§ to 8f 
times the gross annual rent 

- Revenue 

Average Rent per Unit : 

$125 $175 $200 

Investment Range ($000) ; 

975.0-1,250.0 1,365.0-1,750.0 1,560.0-2,000.0 
Assessed Value (37H) : 

365.6-468.3 511.9-656.2 585.0-750.0 
Revenue ($105/$1000) : 

38.4-49.2 53.7-68.9 61.4-78.8 

■ Conclusions 
Revenue figures based on derived tax rate for low 
residence range. Revenue would vary with total 
land use mix as well as initial investment. 

Figures suggest that rentals averaging less than 
$175 per month could be self-supporting. Thus 
needs of Town employees could be met without cost 
to Town. 

This doesn't reflect possible market conditions. 
A developer building in Lincoln might well invest 
more money than he would for similar rentals in 
another location. 

Economic criteria could be less important than 
other objectives listed under paragraph c. above - a 
matter of Town policy. Use of Federal programs 
could of course lower rent levels without necess- 
arily sacrificing quality of design. 



160 



B. SUMMARY OF ECO::0"TC ANALYSIS 

1. Evaluation of Data 

a. Alternatives selected for study include onlv extreme 
of possibilities for each land use, to indicate maxi- 
mum differences in economic impact. !'any other 
interim combinations possible. 

b. Recall that no attempt was made to project value of 
assessment base existing as of 19v^. Valid to compare 
19^0 alternatives with each other (but not with present) 
as indication of likely difference in tax oer house. 

2. Findinrs 

a. Higher rate of residential growth somewhat more expensive, 
other factors bein^ equal. 

b. Importance of non-residential development increased in 
high-PTOwth situation. 

c. Cost of conservation Dro^ram very low in comparison with 
effect of program on revenue per house. 

d. Figures indicate maximum impact of industry; in 
actuality not likely that all of this would, be developed. 
Could also examine imnact of industry in 10-acre incre- 
ments. Certainly with full development importance of 
keeping traffic on major roads would be increased. 

Even modest figure of 20 employees per acre would mean 
more than 1500 cars at peak hours. However, locations 
were chosen with this in mind - maximum isolation of 
industry from residential areas. 

e. General Residence areas will not produce cost compar- 
able to same number of people in single family houses, 
primarily due to differences in school costs. 

f . Probable that apartments would return more than their 
cost to the Town, but this not only basis for justifying 
them. Other objectives may support apartments even if 
benefit to cost ratio is unfavorable. 



161 



3. Possible Amolif ications of Data 

■ — ■ .* I !■—■■■.■■■ ■ !— ■■ —I II— —■ ■ ■■! !■ ■■ I ■ ■■ — — — ^ 

a. Data is set up to permit comparison of numerous mixes, 

b. Can examine industry in terms of amount required to 
maintain even tax rate for any given growth alterna- 
tive, 

c. Alternatives presented here cover only single family 
housing on two or one acre lots plus General Residence 
District apartments. Comparisons could be evolved for 
other density combinations such as 60.j of development 
on 2 acre lots and balance in mixed units at 4 families 
per acre. While model doesn ! t suggest any major dif- 
ferences in per capita non-school costs for various 
alternatives, school costs could vary considerably 
based on kind of units built (numerous studies indi- 
cate significantly lower portion of school age children 
in higher density developments), 

d. Thought should be given to certain intangibles which 
it was not possible to put into the model: 

- while Recreation-Conservation costs are included, 
revenues do not reflect the possible appreciation 
of property values due to the program 

- immediate program to acquire important open space 
areas could allow Town to permit greater flexibility 
in development of remaining land, in terms of both 
kind of building permitted and assessment policy 

on remaining open land 

- the model reflects some differences in house 
values for different rates of growth, but further 
refinements can be made 

- possibilities for expanded type of cluster develop- 
ment, as suggested in paragraph c. above, should be 
studied for impact on composition of population 
and for desirable controls over site plan and gen- 
eral design. 



162 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

William N. Swift, Chairman 
Alan McCl ennen 
Henry B. Hoover 
James Jagger 
Hans Van Leer 

J. Lewis Cunningham, Associate Member 
Betty L. Lang, Associate Member 



Hearings were held on thirteen petitions to the 
Board during the year 1964. Set forth below is a 
summary of the petitions: 

Petition filed by the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company for a special use permit to main- 
tain a public utility building in a residential zone 
on the south side of Route 2A; and the following 
variances: permission to construct on a lot of 4,781 
square feet without frontage on a public way, a vari- 
ance as to width of lot, and variances as to the 
front, rear and side yard requirements. Permission 
granted with certain conditions. 

Petition filed by Paul E. and Margaret B. 
Marsh for a renewal of permit to use the cellar of a 
barn on their property for a private nursery school 
operated by the Lincoln Nursery School, Inc. Per- 
mission granted. 

Petition filed by Alvin Levin and Peter Helburn 
for a variance to allow alterations, improvements 
and additions to two structures on their property on 
Old Winter Street, both of which are less than 30 
feet from the side lot line. Permission granted. 

Petition filed by Bruce R. Fillmore for per- 
mission to remove gravel from his property on Cam- 
bridge Turnpike. Permission granted with certain 
cond it ions . 

Petition filed by Bruce R. Fillmore for per- 
mission to keep rabbits for commercial purposes on 
his property located on the Cambridge Turnpike. Per- 

163 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



mission granted for three years with certain con- 
d it ions . 

Petition filed by Wes-Lex Corporation for a 
permit under Section VI, B, sub-paragraph (8), of 
the Zoning By-Law, to allow the subdivision of a 
parcel of land on Tower Road as a cluster develop- 
ment. A favorable report having been filed by the 
Planning Board, the permit was allowed with certain 
cond it ions . 

Petition filed by Dr. Charles McKhann for a 
variance to allow construction of a single family 
residence on Lot 1 of the Todd Pond subdivision 
within 30 feet of the westerly side lot line. Per- 
mission granted, provided all other requirements of 
the Lincoln Zoning By-Laws are met. 

Petition filed by Gertrude S. Eaton for a per- 
mit to convert a small storeroom into a kitchenette 
which would adjoin a small sitting room, bedroom and 
bath on the ground floor of her home on Bedford Road. 
Permission granted, subject to two conditions. Per- 
mission renewable from year to year. 

Petition filed by Vernon D. Turner for tem- 
porary permission to place a house trailer on his lot 
on Old Sudbury Road for a six months* period. Per- 
mission granted for a six months* period. 

Petition filed by John H. and Thelma C. Fitz-^ 
gerald for permission to construct an addition to 
their home on Lincoln Road, which addition will be 
less than 30 feet from the side lot line. Per- 
mission granted. 

Petition filed by John Swinconeck for a vari- 
ance to permit the construction of a one-car garage 
on a non-conforming lot on Concord Road. Per- 
mission granted. 

Petition filed by Thomas Aprille for a vari- 
ance to permit a single family residence to be moved 
to his lot on the Cambridge Turnpike, said lot con- 
taining an area of 39,315 square feet. Permission 
gr anted . 



164 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



Petition filed by Albert W. Hanlon, Jr., for 
a variance to permit building on a lot on Old Bed- 
ford Road, said lot having less than the required 
frontage. Permission granted. 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

William M. Dean, Building and Wiring Inspector 
Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing Inspector 



Building Permits Issued During 1964: 

New residential buildings 32 

Alterations and additions 37 

Move building 1 

Renew permit 1 

Demolish building 2 

Swimming pools 7 

FEES COLLECTED $1,8 30.20 

Plumbing Permits Issued During 

1964 : 55 

FEES COLLECTED 3 8 8.00 

Wiring Permits Issued During 

1964 ; 78 

FEES COLLECTED 414.25 



165 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 




WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Stuart B. Avery 

Alan McClennen 

Russell P. Mahan, Chairman 



Early in 1964 the Board of Water Commission- 
ers embarked on the vigorous work program outlined 
in the 1963 report. This fell mainly into three 
groups of activity: 

1 . Ma in Cleaning 

2. Main Replacement 

3. Main Extension 

19 64 Main Cleaning . Fortunately the success 
ful bid for main cleaning was far enough below the 
estimate to offset some interesting and unexpected 
overtime work, thereby allowing for the cleaning of 
about 30,000 feet of main at a cost of $11,685, not 
including regular Water Department personnel sal- 
aries. The following mains were cleaned: 

Baker Bridge Road (6000 ft) from Sandy 
Pond Road to Concord Road; 

Concord Road (3500 ft) from Baker Bridge 
Road to Baker Bridge; Old Concord Road 
to South Great Road; 

Old Concord Road (2500 ft) from Baker 
Bridge Road to Concord Road; 



166 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



South Great Road (2600 ft) from Lincoln 
Road to Concord Road; 

Lincoln Road (10,000 ft) from Town Center 
to South Great Road ; 

Weston Road (4200 ft) from Town Center 
to Silver Hill Road ; 

Trapelo Road (1100 ft) from Town Center 
to Lexington Road. 

A number of breaks in some of the old unlined 
cast iron mains during the cleaning process required 
"around the clock" work. The Water Commissioners 
are grateful for the diligence of the department em- 
ployees and cooperating contractors during these 
emergencies, and especially for the patient under- 
standing of the townspeople who were inconvenienced 
during the cleaning program. 

19 64 Main Replacement was a smaller item, but 
also was completed at slightly lower costs than the 
estimates and appropriations. A weak link in the 
main grid of the system has been remedied by paral- 
leling the nineteenth century 6 in. main on South 
Great Road (Route 117) from Farnsworth's Corner 
(Lincoln Road) to Wheeler's Corner (Concord Road, 
Route 126) with 2600 ft of new 10 in. cement asbest- 
os pipe at a cost of $19,600. 

The old 4 in. main on Old Winter Street was 
replaced by 2000 ft of 8 in. cement asbestos pipe 
from its southerly end northerly to a hydrant near 
the sharp curve and hill at Dewey's. The new 8 in. 
main on Old Winter Street was laid for the most part 
in the trench of the old 4 in. pipe. Although at 
times somewhat serpentine, use of the old trench 
saved tremendous blasting expense and kept the ex- 
penditure to well under the original estimates. The 
existing 4 in. pipe completes the circuit back to 
the 6 in. main on Winter Street passing partly 
through private property. 

Connection Charge . Both the Board of Water 
Commissioners and the Board of Selectmen have been 
concerned about the few areas in the existing water 

167 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



system with inadequate pressure, as well as other 
deficiencies in the system, in addition to areas 
of the Town without Town water or fire protection 
from hydrants. To meet at least a share of the 
financial needs of the capital improvements re- 
quired to rectify these deficiencies, the Board of 
Water Commissioners raised the connection charge 
to $750, applicable to all new services after July 
1, 1964 and all new connections after January 1, 
1965. 

1964 Main Extension. At a Special Town 
Meeting on April 15, 1964, the Town voted to extend 
the water system to the end of Sandy Pond Road and 
Fox Run Road. In August the Town again determined 
that the water system should be extended, this time 
as far as Stonehedge Road on Tower Road. This was 
paid for in large part by a previous gift of the 
developer of Stonehedge. In summary form these 
extensions, all of cement asbestos pipe, are as 
follows : 



Sandy Pond Road - 6060 ft 

of 8 in . p ipe 
Fox Run Road - 300 ft of 

8 in . pipe ; and 

400 ft of 2 in. pipe 
Tower Road - 1400 ft of 

8 in. pipe 



Cost 



$33,400. 



$15 , 300. 



1963 and 1964 Subdivision Mains 



New sub- 



divisions were laid out with new cement asbestos 
water mains in both 1963 and 1964 as follows: 



Goose Pond Road 
Deer Run 
Brooks School 
Add it ion 

Todd Pond Road 

Meadowdam Road 

Woodbrook Road 



500 ft of 8 in. 
1000 ft of 6 in. 

500 ft of 8 in. (ex- 
tension of old main). 

3500 ft of 8 in. - 
Lincoln Road to end. 

700 ft of 6 in. - 
Todd Pond Road to end 

600 ft of 6 in. - 
Todd Pond Road to end 



168 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



Short Hill Road - 400 ft of 8 in. - 

Todd Pond Road to end. 
Partridge Lane 
(Deerhaven) - 1200 ft of 8 in. - 

from old pipe to end. 
Gile s devel op- 
men t off South 

Great Road - 600 ft of 6 in. - from 

South Great Road to end 
Hiddenwood Path - 540 ft of 6 in. 

1964 Flushing and Testing. Late in Novem- 
ber in spite of low water in Sandy Pond, it ap- 
peared desirable to flush the system, even though 
the system received considerable flushing during 
the cleaning program. With the assistance of the 
Park Department and Highway Department employees, 
a vigorous and complete program of flushing and 
flow testing was carried out. The flow tests 
showed conclusively that the pipe capacity had been 
increased as had been indicated in earlier limited 
tests. Further, the program identified a few un- 
satisfactory hydrants which are being repaired or 
replaced. Detailed records were kept which will 
be supplemented in the spring when a second "go 
around" of flushing will take place. 

19 6 4 Mee tings . The Commissioners 1 record 
of meetings, usually noted, will be omitted this 
year because so much had to be done that the Com- 
missioners and the Superintendent were in almost 
"continuous session". 

Most particularly we want to thank the Se- 
lectmen for their help along with the Park Depart- 
ment and Highway Department crews who have been 
most cooperative and especially our Executive 
Assistant, Warren F. Flint, who was responsible for 
the coordination of all the departments. 

19 65 Pi ans . Surveys, discussions with 
land owners, and appraisal work continued in res- 
pect to the well site on Tower Road, and it is ex- 
pected specific action on this subject will be 
placed before the Town at Town Meeting. Other 
foreseeable work in 1965 will be additional clean- 



169 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



ing, including the Sandy Pond and Bedford Road 
12 in. mains, along with the 6 in. mains on Sandy 
Pond Road, Trapelo Road (below Huckleberry Hill), 
Tower Road (Lincoln Road to Pierce Hill Road) and 
Pierce Hill Road. This should complete the old 
main cleaning and should leave the system in good 
shape as far as flow and pressure are concerned 
excepting the old unlined 4 in. mains which are to 
be r epl ac ed . 

New construction to replace these old 4 in. 
mains is planned for Winter Street, south of 
Mason's, and along Old County Road, as well as West' 
on Road from De Ford's to Silver Hill Road. Final 
limits on this work depends on the reserves left in 
the 1964 bond accounts and the general borrowing 
capacity of the system in the light of long term 
ne ed s . 

The program for the year ahead in brief is 
tentatively set as follows: 

Winter Street and Old County Road - 4 in. 

rep 1 acemen t ; 
Weston Road - 4 in. replacement; 
Completion of main cleaning; 
Study the design and installation of 

automatic controls for pumps; 
Acquire land for well; 
Replace and repair defective hydrants. 

SUPvMARY . In summary, it may be stated that 
1964 was a very busy year for all concerned. How- 
ever, very substantial progress has been made in 
bringing the system up to present day standards. 
At least we are beginning to understand the prob- 
lems and have made a start on their solution. 
Water Department records of pipe sizes, locations, 
and details on gates and hydrants are complete and 
all parts of the system have been tested in more 
complete detail than was ever possible in previous 
ye ar s . 



170 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



WATER DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 
1964 

In Use 12/31/64 Added in 1964 

Pipe 34 miles 1 mile 

Hydrants 293 14 

Stop Gates 335 20 

Blow-offs 27 

New services 1084 18 

Meters 1098 36 

Renew service 13 



Range of pressure 

in mains 40 - 100 P. S. I 

Total gallons pumped 

in 1964 115,295,800 

Decrease from 1963 12,490,200 



BUILDING CODE STUDY COMMITTEE 

William A. Halsey, Chairman 
Douglas M. Burckett 
Harold Rosenwald 
Stanley D. Porter 



The Building Code Study Committee has com- 
pleted its work, and the revised Code will be pre- 
sented to the Town for acceptance at the Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Copies of the Code may be seen at the Town 
Hall, Library and the office of the Town Clerk. 



171 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Raymond P. Maher , Superintendent 



The highway program for 1964 covered the re- 
surfacing of over six (6) miles of the Town * s ways, 
drainage improvement in a number of cases, white 
line painting, guard rail construction and the patch- 
ing of those areas where deterioration of the pave- 
ment existed. Town forces were used for the greater 
part of the construction on South Great Road which 
took the major part of two months time in late sum- 
mer and f all . 

Snow and ice removal demand a sizeable percent- 
age of the department's time from mid-November 
through March - plowing snow, hauling and spreading 
salt and sand . 

Catch basin and shoulder run-offs require fre- 
quent attention during the winter months. 

When time permits, during the winter season, 
the highway force helps with the reconditioning of 
equipment and gives aid to the Parks Department with 
the winter tree work. In return, the Parks Depart- 
ment supports the Highway Department where snow and 
ice removal require it. Mutual support during crit- 
ical periods adds a factor of efficiency to those de- 
partments in terms of the work forces and the use of 
equipment which could not otherwise be had. 

The steadily improving condition of the roads 
makes snow removal less costly in terms of time re- 
quired to plow a given mile and in equipment mainten- 
ance . 

The new tractor has been a valuable asset in 
relieving seasonal pressures. It is used for mowing 
road shoulders, cleaning up the cemeteries, tree 
work, general loading and landscaping. 

It is believed that the 1956 jeep pickup should 

be replaced with a new heavy duty, four wheel drive. 

This vehicle has gone 80,000 miles and is no longer 
dependable for heavy work. 

172 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John B. French 

John Quincy Adams 

Paul Brooks 

Mary Drury 

James DeNormandie 

Robert Lemire 

Hans Van Leer 

Warren Dwyer , ex-officio 



The increased concern 
interest of all persons wit 
preservation of open spaces 
conservation of natural re- 
sources has been reflected 
ing the year both on a nati 
new legislation. The Wild 
and Water Conservation Fund 
pieces of conservation legi 
the recent conservation mes 
Congress attest to the awar 
ernment to these problems, 
the state legislature remov 
ceiling on amounts which a 
its conservation fund, thus 
available for matching stat 




dur- 

onal and state 

erness Act and 

Act of 1965 ar 
slat ion ; the se 
sage of the Pre 
ene ss of the fe 

Furthermore , 
ed the r elat ive 
town can approp 

increasing the 
e aid on future 



level with 
the Land 
e major 
along with 
s ident to 
deral gov- 
in 1964 
1 y 1 ow 
r iate to 

fund s 

projects. 



The DiPerna land acquisition occupi 
the time of the Commission early in the y 
last year's Town Meeting, the Commission 
and has been successful in obtaining, fed 
for 20% of the purchase price of the DiPe 
The Commission has also made a general su 
all open spaces in Town which was underta 
termine which areas should be included in 
range plan for the preservation of land b 
for conservation purposes. One of the m 
portant of these is the land around Sandy 
which for a number of years the Commissio 
should, to the extent practicable, be pre 
a centrally located town forest or town p 
Commission is working to present plans to 
to continue the project in this area star 
the Garland acquisition. The Garland pr 



ed much of 
ear . After 
appl ied f or , 
eral aid 
r na 1 and . 
rvey of 
ken to d e- 

a long- 
y the Town 
ost im- 

Pond 
n has felt 
served as 
ark. The 

the Town 
ted with 
oject will 



173 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



be completed at this year's Town Meeting with the 
acquisition of the final parcel. 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

William M. Preston, Chairman 
Abigail D. Avery, Secretary 
Bradford Cannon, M. D. 
Donald P. Donaldson 
Margaret Hubbard 
Constantin A. Pertzoff 
William N. Swift 



The Lincoln Land Conservation Trust is a non- 
profit, tax-exempt organization supported by mem- 
bership dues and voluntary contributions, whose 
principal purpose is to promote the preservation of 
the rural character of the Town, We work closely 
with the Town's Conservation Commission. 

During 1964 we acquired four new parcels of 
land amounting to 22.5 acres, bringing our total 
holdings to 59 acres in 11 parcels. At the end 
of 1964 we had 189 dues-paying members. 

The Trust maintains three walking and riding 
trails for the use of Lincoln residents: one around 
Sandy Pond, one along Stony Brook, and one between 
Conant and Silver Hill Roads, These are des- 
cribed in a Trail Bulletin and shown on a Land Con- 
servation Map of Lincoln which can be obtained from 
the Trust Secretary. 



Financial Report for 1964- 
On hand January 1 



$ 2,778.25 



Rece ip ts : 

Membership dues 
Cash gifts 

Proceeds of gifts of 
secur i t ie s 



$1 ,953.00 
3 , 687.50 

13 , 520 .58 



19 , 161 .08 
$21 ,939. 33 



174 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



Expend i tures : 

Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

Mortgage interest 
Mortgage principal 
Pu rchase of land 
Printing and mailing 
Tools , etc . 

On hand December 31 



$ 742.50 

7 , 000 .00 

12 , 000 .00 

171.00 

45 .90 



19.959.40 
$ 1 , 979 .93 



LANDSCAPE COMMITTEE 



Albert S. Brooks 
Elizabeth H. Doherty 

Max M. Mason, Chairman 



Richard J. Eaton 
David L. Garrison 
Mabel H. Todd 



The Landscape Committee acts as an advisory 
group to the Board of Selectmen. Most of the ad- 
vised work is actually carried out by Albert Brooks 
in his capacity as an employee of the Town. Mr. 
Brooks* efforts are sorely needed to make the work 
of this committee, of which he is a member, effective. 
It is of particular importance that Mr. Brooks* ef- 
forts for the Town be directed solely to work ad- 
vised by the Landscape Committee for a two-week per- 
iod both in spring and fall. These seasons repre- 
sent the only time numerous landscape jobs can be 
successfully performed. 

Items which concerned the Landscape Committee 
during the past year were: 

1. Improving the appearance of the triangular 
grass traffic island in Lincoln Center. 

2. Planting in the area of the Brooks School. 

3. Effective methods of controlling roadside 
brush . 



175 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 



4. Mulching of planting done during recent 
year s . 

5. The Town's need for help from individual 
property owners in picking up trash 
dropped along the roads. (It is inter- 
esting to note that some have gone con- 
siderably further than their own proper- 
ty, such as Mr. George Tartaell and Mr. 
Charles Kind leber ger . ) 

During 1965 the committee plans to advise on 
planting additions in the cemetery, see ivy estab- 
lished on the fire house, and have certain planting 
renewal in front of the Town Hall. Areas of con- 
tinuing major concern will be the roadsides and the 
sc hool area . 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

James DeNormandie 
H. Arnold MacLean 
Robert A. Spence , Chairman 



A layout of part of the new section just 
finished is being made to provide additional lots. 
This section will have all monuments level with 
the ground . » 

The usual routine maintenance was performed 
during the year. 

The number of interments in 1964 was 17. 

The Commissioners wish to express their ap- 
preciation for the assistance and cooperation given 
them by officers and employees of the Town during 
the past year . 



176 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Edwin M. Cole (Life Member) 

Morley M. John (Life Member) 

Alice G. Meriam (Life Member) 

Margaret B. Marsh (School Committee 

Appo i n tee ) 

Leo A. Palmer (Selectmen Appointee) 

John A. Carley, Chairman (Elected by the Town) 



In 1964 the Lincoln Public Library contin- 
ued to serve the Town in an active and varied man 
ner. In turn it received much valued and appre- 
ciated support in the form of generous and inter- 
esting gifts from individual citizens and from 
numerous town organizations that have done much 
to make it a more effective and attractive Lib- 
rary. Particularly enjoyed by all have been the 
flowers provided weekly by the Garden Club for 
the Library Circulation Desk, and for the Tarbell 
room by Mr. and Mrs. George G. Tarbell. 

Again the Trustees wish to express appre- 
ciation to the many volunteers ably organized by 
Mrs. Charles Stevens, who contribute hours of ser' 
vice to the Library manning the desk, repairing 
books, typing, shelving books. Their contri- 
bution gives the Town a library service that 
would normally require a larger staff and a lar- 
ger bud ge t . 

School and Library cooperation has been an 
important part of the year's activity. Regular 
meetings have been held by the staffs of the Pub- 
lic Library and the Lincoln School Library, at 
which plans and problems have been discussed and 
a closer working relationship established. A 
comprehensive statement of policy has been drawn 
up for the information of the Town showing the 
relationships and special functions of each Li- 
brary. 

177 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY & RECREATION 



During National Book Week the School and Pub- 
lic Libraries jointly sponsored movies for children 
which were shown to a full house in the Public Li- 
br ar y . 

Special events during the year included a popu- 
lar Poetry class, taught by Mrs. Warwick Field of 
Lincoln and meeting every other week in the Library. 
The proceeds from the class were most generously 
given to the Library for the purchase of books for 
the poetry collection. 

In April the Friends of the Library sponsored 
an interesting panel discussion on Central America. 
The honorariums refused by the foreign students tak- 
ing part were used to buy books for a library of each 
student's country. A Nicaraguan Library has res- 
ponded with the gift of a book to the Lincoln Li- 
brary. 

1964 was inventory year at the Library, Every 
five years the book collection is checked through 
completely. This year over one thousand books were 
discarded, and the total book collection is now 
24,335. A summary of the still impressive circula- 
tion will be found in the Librarian's report which 
foil ows . 

In March Mrs. Paul Marsh was appointed by the 
School Committee to a term of three years as Library 
Trustee . 

In May the Trustees accepted regretfully the 
resignation of their senior member, Dr. Roland Mac- 
kenzie, who had served the Library so valuably for 
30 years. Dr. Mackenzie became an ex-officio mem- 
ber of the Library Trustees in 1934 as the Chairman 
of the Lincoln School Committee. In 1938 he was 
appointed a Life Trustee succeeding Mr. John Farrar, 
and served in that capacity of 26 years. Mrs. De- 
Witt John was appointed a Life Trustee to succeed 
Dr. Mackenzie. 

The Trustees and Library staff invite all 
townspeople who remember the dark and forbidding 
basement under the old Library building to visit it 

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SCHOOLS. LIBRARY &, RECREATION 



now. It has become an integral part of our stack 
system, housing the book collection from to 499 
and the entire back periodical collection. Paint, 
adequate lighting, additional stacks, a study table 
and chairs, and a dehumid if ier , have made it an at- 
tractive and usable area. 

With the transformation of the old basement, 
the space to house the Library collection seems 
adequate for the present, and expansion into the 
unfinished new basement room can be deferred to a 
future year . 



VOLUNTEERS. 19 6 4 



Lawrence Anderson 

Stuart Avery 

Barry Bigelow 

Charles M. Bliss 

John Brown 

William Butler 

Richard Coons 

Thomas Cope 

John Crawford 

Bruce Daniels 

Margaret Delling 

Robert Emerson 

Nathaniel C. Gerson 

Henry Hoover 

Christopher Hurd 

John Irwin 

DeWitt John 

Henry Kane 

Charles Kindleberger 

Bruce King 

Roger Kuhns 

James Lampert 

Shih Ying Lee 

A. A. Levin 

John Lincoln 
Lincoln Boy Scouts 
Lincoln Girl Scouts 
Mrs. Richard Meriam 
Mrs. William Morse 
Mrs. Wayne Mount 
Mrs. Foster Nystrom 



Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


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Mrs. 


Mrs. 


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Mrs. 


Mrs . 



Mrs. Jackson Parker 
Mr. Jeffrey Postel 

Mrs. Sholem Postel 

Mrs. Neil Powell 

Mrs. Edward Rawson 

Miss Anne Rhodes 

Mrs. Howard Snelling 
Mr. Charles Stevens 

Mrs. Charles Stevens 

Mrs. Arthur Thiessen 

Mrs. R. Langdon Wales 

Mrs. Henry Warner 

Mrs. George Wells 

Mrs. T. Worthington 



JUNIOR VOLUNTEERS 



Reginald Butler 
Frederick Daniels, 
Margo Hapgood 
Timothy Hester 
Sarah Kennedy 
Scott Kennedy 
George Loewenstein 
Peter Out ten 
Constance Witherby 



Jr. 



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SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



LIBRARY DONORS. 19 6 4 

Mrs. Archibald Adkins 

Mrs. Lawrence Anderson 

Miss Virginia Armstrong 

Mr. Paul Brooks 

Mr. Martin Buerger 

Mrs. Roger Burke 

Dr. &, Mrs. Bradford Cannon 

Mr. John Carley 

Dr. Walter Caskey 

Mrs. John Caswell 

Mrs. Thomas Coan 

Dr. Edwin M. Cole 

Dr. Oliver Cope 

Mrs. Thomas Cope 

Mr. & Mrs. James DeNormandie 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Donaldson 

Mr. Richard Eaton 

Mrs. Robert Emerson 

Mrs. A. Br ad lee Emmons 

Mrs. Warwick Field (Poetry Class) 

Miss Olive Floyd 

Miss Norma Fryatt 

Mrs. Albert Fullerton 

Mr. 86 Mrs. Richard Gallun 

Mrs. Duane Haagensen 

Mr. Whitney Haley 

Mrs. Norman Hapgood 

Mr. Roger Harris 

Mrs. Elliott Hedge 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Hoover 

Mr. & Mrs. Eliot Hubbard 

Mrs. Benjamin Hyde 

Mrs. Allen Jackson 

Mrs. Charles Jenney 

Mrs. DeWitt John 

Miss Mabel Kelley 

Mrs. Howard Kent 

Mr . Charles Kindleberger 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Konnerth 

Mrs. William Langton 

Lincoln Garden Club 

Mr s. John Lincoln 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 



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SCHOOLS, LIBRARY &. RECREATION 



LIBRARY DONORS, Cont. 

&, Mrs. Robert A. Loesel 
Ludwig Luft 

John Lummus 

John Manzelli 

William McKennan 
& Mrs. Richard S. Meriam 
Middlesex Mental Health Association 
Richard Morgan 

Thomas Morse 

Mark Naiman 
& Mrs. Stanley Page 
& Mrs. George Palmer 
&, Mrs. Theodore Polumbaum 

William Preston 
& Mrs. Roy Raja 

Margaret Rathbone 

James Riddle 

Henry Rugo 

C. DeWitt Smith 

Shelley Swift 
George Tarbell 

Edward S. Taylor 
& Mrs. Frederick Taylor 
&, Mrs. Arthur Thiessen 

Maryalice Thoma 

Raymond Tunnell 

Robert Vandell 

Henry Warner 
WBZ Radio 
Mr. George Wells 
Mr . Robert White 
Mr. William Williams 



Mr. 


Mr. 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mr. 


Midd 


Dr. 


Mrs. 


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Mr. 


Mr. 


Mr. 


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Mr. 


Miss 


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SCHOOLS, LIBRARY & RECREATION 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Hours open: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 10:30 to 8:30 

Tuesday, Thursday & 

Saturday 10:30 to 5:00 

Closed legal holidays and 
Saturdays in July and August. 



STATISTICS, 1964 



January 1 - December 31, 1964 

Gener al 

New members 221 

Total membership 2,548 

Amount of fines collected $2,048.16 

Number of days open 294 

Acquis it ions 

Books purchased 2,303 

Books received by gift 512 

Total acquisitions, 1964 
Inventory, 1963 

Books discarded or lost 

2 4,335 

Record s : 
Inventory 1963 263 

Purchases 94 

Gifts 80 

437 

C ir culat ion 

Adult non-fiction 13,167 

Adult fiction 14,502 
Pe riodicals 1,156 

Records 1 , 409 

Juvenile 34, 3 8 3 

Total 1964 circulation 64,617 

182 



2 


, 815 


23 


,087 


25 


,902 


1 


,567 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY L RECREATION 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Mary Jane Butler Albert E. Nelson 

Nancy Butler Nancy K. Outten 

John W. Fisher Joan A. Ogden 

Charles E. Jennings Fred P. Walkey 

Walter I. Keyes Arlene B. Wirsig 
J. Bertram Kessel, Chairman 



PROGRAMS 

Recreation programs sponsored by the Committee 
were: men's softball, men's and boys' basketball, 
adult tennis tournament, summer playground, chil- 
dren's tennis and swimming, skiing and skating. 

Softball 

The softball league consisted of six teams: 
North Lincoln, Tower Road, Regionals, Nike Base, Fire 
and Police, and Geophysics. The withdrawl of the 
Geophysics after the season's start made room for a 
teenage group which competed creditably with their 
elders during the remainder of the schedule. 

Forty-five games were played during the regular 
season from May 3 to July 29. Four additional play- 
off games completed the season during the first week 
of August. The North Lincoln Bearcats won the 
pennant and the playoffs. 

John W. Fisher serves as softball commissioner. 

SUMMER PLAYGROUND 

Per sonnel . Emmett "Pete" Ingersoll directed 
the program. Assisting him as senior leaders were: 
Alfred Callahan, Frances 0. Cibel, Susan Filene, 
Rosebud Holland, Martha Lee Koenig, Janet A. Olm- 
sted, Richard W. Pleshaw, Sharon S. Schaefer, Richard 
E. Whitaker. In charge of tennis was Chloe Bous- 
caren, assisted by James Miser. 

Serving as Program Aide Trainees were: Janet A. 
Chisholm, Bruce Foust, Kathryn Grason, Charles Hagen- 
ian, Reta Mickle, John O'Brien, Susan Rice, Cathy 

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SCHOOLS. LIBRARY &. RECREATION 



Tlumack i . 

Ac t iv i t ie s . Themes for each of the five 
playground weeks were: American Revolution, Gold rush, 
Centennial, Holiday and Fantasy. Of particular 
success were: Barter Day of Goldrush Week, Christmas 
Day of Holiday Week, the operetta "Kris Kringle", and 
the parody of "Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs", by the 
ol der boy s . 

Special events included the stagemobile per- 
formances of "Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp" and 
"Jack and the Beanstalk", baseball games with Ashland 
and Weston, bike hikes to Sudbury and to the Concord 
Bridge, a family night for parents, siblings and rel- 
atives, a sleep out for girls, Wednesday cookouts, 
the Fourth of July parade, and a special day for pre- 
kindergarteners. 

Auto mechanics instruction took place on two 
cars, manual training was offered to both boys and 
girls, and a regular weekly newspaper, "The Play- 
ground Press" carried articles, essays, poems, cross- 
word puzzles, biographical sketches, drawings, and 
schedules prepared by children and staff. 

The arts and crafts program made use of such 
media as papier mache, plaster, clay, plastic, rocks, 
wood, straws, potatoes, wire, copper, blueprint paper, 
chalk, gimp, and paint. Projects included masks, 
animals, piggy banks, jewelry, collages, sculptures, 
mobiles, head bands, hats, lanyards and puppets. 

A special program for the older youths (6th 
grade and up), known as the OYGS , was planned by the 
participants with the assistance of leaders. The 
OYGS met in a classroom that developed into a club- 
like atmosphere. 

Playground attendance was as follows: 1st 
week - 287; 2nd week - 230; 3rd week - 220; 4th 
week - 195; 5th week - 169. 

r 

The swimming program was divided this year in- 
to two four-week sessions with a quota of 200 chil- 
dren for the first and 80 for the second. Coordina- 
ted by the Concord Red Cross and the Walden District 



184 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



Water Safety Council, classes at Walden Pond were 
held for beginners, intermediates, swimmers, junior 
life savers, and senior life savers. 

Mrs. Arlene Wirsig was in charge of the summer 
playground and was assisted by Jane Butler, Joan Og- 
den and Nancy Out ten. Mrs. Flo Caras organized the 
swimming schedule; Mr s . Na ncy Butler supervised 
transportation and instruction. 



( 128 ) children 
sponsored by the 
s program was 
fifth t hr ough 
given the Leigh- 
in 1963 and were 
intermed iates , 
ganized for Junior 
Junior Tennis 



TENNIS 

One hundred and twenty-eight 
participated in the tennis program 
Lincoln Recreation Committee. Thi 
made available to Lincoln children, 
twelfth grades. The children were 
ton Tennis Test as previously done 
placed in three groups: beginners, 
and advanced. Teams were again or 
and Senior boys for the New England 
League and Senior girls for the 
Junior Wightman Cup League. The 
very successful Parent -Chi Id Round 
Robin contest was also repeated 
this year. Due to an untimely 
auto accident in the latter part 
of July, our tennis instructor, 
Miss Chloe Buscaren, was unable 
to return to the program. With 
the help of Bert Kessel and other 
members of the tennis committee, 
James Miser ably carried the pro- 
gram through its final two weeks. 

Mrs. Virginia Niles and Mrs. 
Isabel Farley were responsible for 
the organization and conduct of the 
children's tennis activities. 

The tennis courts were more intensively used 
this year than ever before, and if the interest and 
growth continue, the town may wish to consider add- 
ing two more courts in a few years. 

The adult fall tournament had nearly 150 en- 
trants. Winners were: Men's Singles - Duncan Nelson; 
Men's Doubles - James Miser and Frederick Walkey; 




185 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY & RECREATION 



Mixed Doubles - Tolly Lundquist and Frederick Walkey; 
Ladies* Singles - Marcia Roehr; Ladies 1 Doubles - 
Judith Emmons and Sally Jackson. 

The Clinic and Demonstration on July 4th 
featured four nationally ranked junior players from 
various parts of the U . S. The arrangements for 
this event were made by Mr. and Mrs. Harold Soule. 

The Committee wishes to thank all the towns- 
people who worked diligently maintaining the courts. 
These courts are as good as any in Massachusetts and 
are kept that way through the voluntary labor of the 
user s . 

BASKETBALL 

The basketball program for fifth through 
twelfth grade boys began on December 12th and contin- 
ues throughout the winter on Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 1 
p.m. George Saia, physical educator in the Lincoln 
school system, is in charge, and is assisted by John 
Fisher, James Miser, Robert Nelson and David Palmer. 

The men*s basketball program meets Monday 
evenings at 7:30. 

Walter I. Keyes and Albert E. Nelson are res- 
ponsible for organizing both programs. 

ICE SKATING 

The skating pond in Pierce Park has been com- 
pleted and is in use by children and adults. 

The project was engineered by the Federal Soil 
Conservation Service which met with Recreation Com- 
mittee members Charles E. Jennings and Walter I. 
Keyes in the planning stages and also supervised the 
construction of the pond. A large share of the 
credit for this project belongs to Warren Flint, who 
coordinated the complete project and wisely guided 
it throughout. 

A committee composed of Ann Bastress, John 
Garrison, Charles E. Jennings, Robert Niles, and Mary 
Lou Wollmar have been working on the organization of 
activities and maintenance for the skating facility. 

186 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



SKIING 

Two hundred and twenty-five (225) children 
registered on January 6th for the four-week ski 
school to be conducted on successive Wednesdays, 
1:45 to 3 p.m., on DeNormandie's Hill, Trapelo Road. 

Mrs. Christopher VanCuran directs the ski 
school and is assisted by Briar Roberts and 32 moth- 
ers who receive their instruction on Wednesday morn- 
ings . 

Coordinating the ski program is Mrs. William 
B. Butler, assisted by Mrs. Stanley S. Wirsig. 

RECREATION SURVEY 

A questionnaire to determine the recreation 
interests, needs and skills of children and adults 
in Lincoln was developed and distributed by the Rec- 
reation Committee. 320 forms have been returned 
and are in the process of being tabulated. 

The results of the tabulation will be dis- 
cussed with the Selectmen and the Land Use Committee 
followed by a series of public hearings. 

WALDEN DISTRICT WATER SAFETY COUNCIL 

Lincoln maintains a membership in the Council 
along with Hanscom Field and the towns of Acton, Bed- 
ford, Boxboro, Carlisle, Concord and Sudbury. Organ- 
ized in 1962 the Council has as its purpose the pro- 
motion, regulation and supervision of water safety 
programs for the member towns at Walden Pond. 

Formerly subsidized and administered by the 
American Red Cross, Concord Chapter, the Water Safety 
Program at Walden Pond is now conducted by the Coun- 
cil which receives its authority from the Middlesex 
County Commissioners. Beginning with the summer of 
1965, each town will be responsible for a portion of 
the cost of program including instructors 1 salaries, 
equipment and supplies, according to its population. 
Lincoln has a tentative allotment of 325 children for 
the first session scheduled for June 28 through July 
23 . 

Mrs. William H. Butler, Jr. and J. Bertram Kes- 
sel are Lincoln's representatives to the Council. - 

187 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Annette E. Gras 
Charles W. Calkins, Jr. 
Robert L. Filbin, ex-officio 
John D. Crawford, Chairman 



"How does the Scholarship Committee operate?" 
is a question often asked of Committee members. 
Basically, the Committee administers the Scholar- 
ship Fund, a Town Trust Fund established in 1954 
"to aid deserving Lincoln children to continue their 
formal education beyond high school". In practice, 
this involves many questions of policy. Who ar*e 
"deserving"? How many should be aided? How 
much aid should be given? 

It is the Committee's belief that every 
student with the ability and desire to continue 
his education should have the opportunity to do so. 
For many, there is no difficulty. For some, dif- 
ficulties are eased because of outstanding academ- 
ic achievement. For others, however, higher edu- 
cation requires a real sacrifice, on the part of 
the family, the student, or both. It is to the 
latter group that the Committee feels the greater 
responsibility. 

Lincoln scholarships are awarded only to 
those who apply. Finding that many students were 
unaware of this opportunity, the Committee in 1964 
distributed application forms to all Lincoln seniors 
at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School. As in 
the past, forms were also available at the school 
offices. Eight students, a record number, applied, 
one of whom was already in his freshman year at 
c ol le ge . 

The application forms themselves were de- 
signed to provide both the Committee and the stu- 
dent with a realistic picture of the student's 
total needs and available resources as well -as his 
academic preparation. Personal interviews, per- 
haps the pleasantest of the Committee's duties, and 
contacts with friends and teachers suggested by the 



188 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY L RI TION 



student, help form a. I of that 

ness of purpose" whic I Committee looks for 

every applicar. - . 

Actual gra * g of awards, of course, is ~ - 
pendent on the CoBiittee' Le re 

whic! depend upor the g * of 

e townspeople. 

- Scholar - grown e a. 

with the help of individual gifts, org 
benefits such as the 4 -H Club Horse Show, 
ments put on by 1 LSA, the dc ul p] 
presente * e spring of 1964 - e 8th gra: 
Another source o: oie is the 4th of July r 
fees, collected olunteer - . LI] anol - 

er is the interest from thel - ralreser 
begun and augmente al gifts careful 

managed by the Town Commissioners of I 

So far, the steady growth of * 9 

Fund has kept pace wit * e grow . T 

C omm lttee and sure] I 5 -~ "-are 

most grateful for all who made I possibl 

The Committee also wis -tot -- 

pher Hurd , who served two years th< Committ- 
with great under-- _ and en1 tm m '. ' Lr . 

resigned in May because of ill heal- . Be 
succeeded ^ Lttier C ap- 

pointed by the Town Moderator. 



: S: 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Paul Brooks 

Elizabeth Harney 

Thomas Winship, Chairman 



The 71st year of the Bemis Lecture Series pro- 
vided, as usual, a most varied fare of entertainment 
and information for Lincoln residents. 

On October 23, 1964, Mr. William C. Powell, 
Public Information Chief at the United Nations, pre- 
sented a vivid picture of the United Nations* activ- 
ities and problems. 

On December 4, at Smith School, many dedicated 
sports enthusiasts braved the elements in order to 
hear Bud Collins, the Boston Globe sports columnist, 
describe this year's Olympics held in Japan. Slides 
were shown and a good deal of amusing commentary given 
on the events, participants, and surroundings. The 
question and answer period which followed was partic- 
ularly lively and amusing. 

The following month, on January 15, Isaac 
Asimov, science fiction writer and Professor of Bio- 
Chemistry, regaled us with delightful anecdotes of 
how, why and what he writes. The young people in 
the audience, and there were many, were most atten- 
tive and responsible. 

The final program will be a first in several 
respects. A dramatic reading of "Dear Liar", an 
adaptation of the letters of George Bernard Shaw and 
Mrs. Patrick Campbell, written and performed by a 
well known actor and director of the Boston Arts 
Festival, Jerome Kilty, and his wife, Cavada Humphrey, 
will be presented in the new Brooks School auditorium 
on Apr il 2 , 1965 . 

The Trustees welcome suggestions from the towns- 
people on possible guests for future programs and 
would also like to thank the town for its continued 
interest . 



190 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Victor A. Lutnicki, President 



In its fifteenth year the DeCordova and Dana 
Museum and Park added approximately 5.74 acres to 
its land area by purchase from the Weston Estate. 
This protracted transaction involved two of the 
Museum's neighbors and other townsmen. Without 
their patience, persistence, and generous inter- 
est in the Museum, the acquisition of this much 
needed additional land area might not have been 
possible. 

The additional acreage did come rather un- 
expectedly and required a reassessment of the 
Museum's expansion plans. The addition of build- 
ing facilities that embraced the use of the en- 
larged site was thought more appropriate than the 
design first decided upon. This change, together 
with the 1 es s -t han-hoped-f or balance in the Devel- 
opment Fund, has unfortunately delayed the building 
program for as much as a year. It is, however, 
being vigorously pursued. 

The Board lost a talented and loyal member 
when John Lincoln moved his residency to Provi- 
dence. It heartily endorsed the Selectmen's 
choice of Francis S. Andrews as John Lincoln's 
successor. Mr. Andrews has been an active and 
generous supporter of the Museum's program and will 
strengthen the Museum's policy-making body. 

There is no test of a Museum's program more 
revealing than the attendance and participation of 
the community it endeavors to serve. By this ex- 
acting standard, DeCordova in 1964 continued to im- 
prove upon its established success as a unique and 
valued part of the lives of an increasing number of 
people. In design and execution this program 
stands to the credit of the Museum's Executive 
Director, Frederick P. Walkey, and his staff. In 
this much deserved acknowledgment, specific men- 
tion must also be made of the Assistant Director, 
Foster H. Nystrom, and the Assistant to the Direct- 
or, Miriam Jagger . 

191 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY & RECREATION 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
Frederick P. Walkey 



My report will be briefer and more personal 
this year than in previous years. Instead of 
carefully detailing the past year's events, it 
seems appropriate to make an assessment of over- 
all growth and development now that the Museum 
has been open for more than fourteen years. 

From the early and recent history of the 
Museum I want to single out two men for special 
recognition. In honoring these two, I believe 
that I honor all the citizens of the Town and 
every board member with whom I have served, be- 
cause these men epitomize the character and 
spirit of Lincoln as I have known it. 

Dr. Robert DeNormandie was the President of 
the Board of Directors when I became Executive 
Director in 1949, and he served the Museum with 
dedication until his death in 1952. I have 
never known a more forthright, direct and warmly 
human person. I remember him with the greatest 
affection, for he saw the Museum through the ini- 
tial years, a time when every action taken was a 
trail blazer and every action was subjected to 
careful scrutiny by the Town. A quality which 
Dr. DeNormandie shared with his successor and one 
which distinguished his medical career was a de- 
votion to professional standards, and every de- 
cision on Museum policy was governed by his in- 
sistence on excellence. Considering both the 
geography and the time, the policy of the new 
Museum was courageously progressive. To estab- 
lish a new institution which fostered the cause 
of modern art in a small New England town in 1949 
reflected a community and a citizenry unique in 
their time. Now that modern art has become so 
universally and popularly accepted, it is hard 
to realize that only fifteen years ago the situa- 
tion was completely reversed. 

In 1951 the mantle of Board leadership 
passed from the remarkable Doctor to J. Quincy 

192 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



Adams. Quincy, who had been an original member 
of the Board, was to give twelve more devoted 
years to the Museum as President. I know that 
its success and welfare were supremely important 
to him. Through all that time he was unwavering 
in his devotion to the ideals set forth in the be- 
ginning; many times I relied on his unfailing 
support to push the Museum program forward. 

In citing the outstanding contributions of 
Dr. DeNormandie and Mr. Adams, I hope to point up 
an attitude which has been present in Lincoln 
throughout the Mu seum's history. The Mu s e u m was 
conceived to have a central role in Lincoln* s cul- 
tural life and to give leadership to the whole 
area. To succeed, it needed the active support 
of the people in this community and others. The 
success, measured by any standard, which the 
Mu seum has achieved, is the result of the direct 
participation of hundreds upon hundreds of people 
from Lincoln and beyond. The membership of more 
than 1800 families from 88 communities in Massa- 
chusetts and from eleven states demonstrates the 
esteem in which it is held and the role it plays 
in the r eg i on . 

Circumstances have combined to give Lincoln 
a good museum and arts center. They have also 
imposed a responsibility on the Town to assure 
that the progress made to date continues. Lin- 
coln is a small town, and a good museum is a po- 
tentially large burden. Imaginative planning, 
continued cooperation from the townspeople, and 
a community-held sense of mission will be re- 
quired to expand this unique institution. A few 
small university towns can boast of a similar 
community advantage, but in general, such in- 
stitutions are found only in large cities. 
Julian DeCordova made a remarkable gift to the 
Town. The Museum has not yet, however, received 
any significant additional capital bequests. I 
do not think it inappropriate to suggest that any 
citizen who wishes to further enrich his com- 
munity might think about enlarging the DeCordova 
endowment, establishing a named fund for the pur- 
chase of art works, or endowing the music program. 
There are other ideas worth exploring, and members 



193 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY & RECREATION 



of the Board of Directors are always available 
to discuss them. 

This year, for the first time, I feel that 
we have really turned a corner. For six years 
we have been talking and planning expansion, but 
now the prospect of building a modest addition 
is actually a reality. The need for expansion 
has been spelled out in every DeCordova report 
for the past half-dozen years, but it may be 
helpful to restate it. We need to expand two 
aspects of the Museum simultaneously - work space 

The office, storage and ser- 
vice space in the present 
building is inadequate. The 
existing classrooms are too 
small and two few to offer 
even the minimum program to 
be expected of an "art cen- 
ter". Transferring classes 
from their present locations 
to new rooms will immeasura- 
bly improve the internal 
Museum operation. Those who 
contribute to the building of 
the new studios are not merely 
supporting the art instruction 
program, but helping us to ex- 
pand the whole physical plant 
and thereby improve the ef- 
ficiency of the Museum opera- 
tion. Money has come from 
hundreds of people in many 
communities, but in the final analysis the great- 
est proportion must come from Lincoln. The Museum 
is owned by the Town and governed by its citizens, 
and it will be an outstanding arts center if the 
Town is determined to make it so,.- 




194 



SCHOOLS. LIBRARY L RECREATION 



DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Board of Directors, December 1964 

Victor A. Lutnicki, President 

Eliot Hubbard, III, Vice President 

Janet Daniels, Clerk 

Stanley Heck, Treasurer 

Paul W. Cook, Jr., Assistant Treasurer 

Dana W. Atchley, Jr. 

Francis S. Andrews 

Ad ministrative Staff, December 1964 

Frederick P. Walkey, Director 

Foster H. Nystrom, Assistant Director 

Miriam Jagger , Assistant to the Director 

Ann Alcott Lummus , Associate Secretary 

Carol B. Allen, Registrar 

Barbara Adolph Gold, Curatorial Assistant 

Cordelia Molloy, Bookkeeper 

Arthur Mazmanian, Graphic Designer 

Karl Lahnstein, Building Superintendent 

Floriy Camp obas s o , Caretaker 

Hugh Parsons, Custodian 

Associate Council, December 1964 



Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Mrs . 


Mrs. 



Everett A. Black, Chairman 

John P. Stevenson, Secretary 

Albert England, Jr., Music Chairman 

Henry Hoover, Garden Club Representative 

Hay den Mason, A. I. M. Representative 

Max M. Mason, Auction Chairman 

Robert L. Moore, Lincoln Area Chairman 

Robert L. Niles 

Leopold Peavy, Ar t is t s-at-Wor k Day 

Chairman 
C. DeWitt Smith, Membership Chairman 
Theodore Tucker 

Raymond Tunnell, Assistant Lincoln Chair- 
man 
Charles Wadsworth, Hospitality Chairman 
John W. White, Film Chairman 
Robert Booth, Flower Arrangements Chairman 



195 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY &, RECREATION 



Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 

Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 



Charles Crumm 
Robert Grady 

John R. Ehrenfeld, Acton Chairman 
Ascher Shapiro, Arlington Chairman 
Herbert C. Lee, Belmont Chairman 
Edwin Campbell, Carlisle Chairman 
Richard Adler , Concord Co-Chairman 
James Skinner, Concord Co-Chairman 
Richard I. Miller, Lexington Chairman 
Robert Bunshaft, Newton Chairman 
William Stenzel , Sudbury Co-Chairman 
Clarence G. Fauntleroy, Sudbury Co- 
Chairman 
John Beard, Wayland Co-Chairman 
Hugh Leney, Wayland Co-Chairman 
G. Lane Johnson, Wellesley Chairman 
Joseph Gardella, Weston Co-Chairman 
Radcliffe Edmonds, Weston Co-Chairman 
Haig Tatosian, Bedford Co-Chairman 
Robert King, Bedford Co-Chairman 
Arthur Vershbow, Print Club Chairman 



196 



SCHOOLS, LIBRARY L RECREATION 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Operating Statement for 1964 



Operating Income: 
Tr us t s 

Associate Contributions 
Tuition from Classes 
Receipts from Films, 
Concerts, Benefits 
Other Income (Sales, 

Services, Misc.) 
Interest on Savings 

Total Operating Income 

Operating Expense: 

Administrative Staff 

(Salaries, Benefits) 
School 

(Expense, Salaries) 
Operating Expense of 
Museum and Park 
Total Operating Expense 

Net Gain for 1964 



$75,093.0 2 
27 , 514 .00 
38 , 492.58 

19 , 501 .65 

17 , 466 . 24 
4.167.73 



68 , 669 .21 
29 , 506.45 
81 .922.91 



$182, 235 .22 



180 . 098 .57 



2.136.65 



Balance Sheet. December 31. 



As se t s : 

Savings Bank Accounts 
Checking Account 
Imprest Accounts (Payroll, 
Petty Cash, Post Office) 

Total Assets 



1964 



$108 , 365 .44 
505 .39 



4 . 313 .15 



$113 . 183.98 



Liabilities : 

Corporate Reserve Fund 

Building Fund (Receipts 
from Benefits) 

2nd Decade Fund (Receipts 
from Campaign) 

Depreciation Funds (Reserves 
for capital expenditures to 
replace equipment and repair 
buildings, roads, parking) 

Imprest Funds 

Working Capital 

Total Liabilities 



10 ,000 .00 
12, 718.08 
66,905 .65 



13,417.79 
4,185 .00 
5 .957 .46 



$ 113 . 183.98 



Total Allocations to Funds in 1964 
Total Expenditures from Funds in 1964 



$ 17 , 851 . 36 
$ 23,500.44 



197 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
REPORT 
to the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 19 63 - 1964 



September 1 

September 2 

September 3 

September 6 

September 7 

September 8 

September 9 

September 10 

October 12 

November 11 

November 24 



November 


29 


December 


22 


January 


3 


Februar y 


21 


February 


28 


April 


18 


April 


25 


May 


30 


June 


22 



SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 19 6 5-66 



Wedne sday 
Thursday 
Fr iday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thur sday 
Fr iday 
Tuesday 
Thur sday 
Wednesd ay 

Monday 
Wednesday 

Mo n d a y 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Wednesday 



Teacher Workshop 

Teacher Workshop 

Teacher Workshop 

Labor Day 

Teacher Orientation 

Teacher Orientation 

Teacher Orientation 

Students Report for Classes 

Holiday - Columbus Day 

Holiday - Veterans' Day 

Vacat ion 

(Begins at Noontime) 

Classes Resume 

Vac a t i on 

(Begins at Noontime) 

Classes Resume 

Vacation Week 

Classes Resume 

Vacat ion Week 

Classes Resume 

Holiday - Memorial Day 

Classes end at Noontime 



N.B.: Within the regular school year, classes end noontime 
on Wednesdays with the exception of the weeks in 
which there are holidays: in those instances, Wed- 
nesdays are full days of school. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will 
reverse on Monday, January 31, 1966. 

SUMMER SCHOOL - 19 66 



June 
July 



29 
27 



Wednesday 
Wednesday 



Summer School Opens 
Summer School Ends 



* + a|e * * * * 



Local signals will be given 
7:15 a.m. 
7:30 a.m. 



on our fire alarm system - 
3-3-3, repeated at 
3-3-3 



Radio announcements will be read between the period of 6:30 a.m 
and 7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up local phone lines 
to school officials and bus operators. (WCOP. . . . 1150K ; 
WBZ. . . .1030K; WEEI. . . .590K; WNAC . . . . 680K ; WHDH. . . . 8 50K ; 
WEZE 1260K; WMEX 1510K) 

Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL" are made by the Lincoln 
Superintendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary Schools 
(grades K-8 ) only. Announcements for the Regional High School 
are made by the Regional Superintendent of Schools and will be 
designated "Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School". 



199 



SCHOOLS 
LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 



Term Expires 



School Committee 



Perry J, Culver, M. D., Chairman 1967 

(Mrs.) Helen Gilfoy 1966 

C. DeWitt Smith 1965 

Meetings: Regular: First Monday of each month, 

7:30 p.m. Office of the 
Superintendent. 259-9400 

Called: Third Monday of each month 
usually, and other meetings 
as stated. Time and place 
to be designated. 

All regular meetings open. 
Items for the agenda must be 
in the Office of the Superin- 
tendent by 3:00 p.m. on the 
Thursday prior to the Monday 
meeting , 

Superintendent of Schools 

Robert L. Filbin Center School 259-9400 

Superintendent's Office Staff 

(Mrs.) Mary Ann Wilson Secretary 

(Mrs.) Harriett Parks Financial Secretary 

(Mrs.) Mary Bufton Clerk-Typist 

Hours: Office of the Superintendent - 
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Monday - 
Friday; Saturdays and evenings 
by appointment. 

Principal, Smith School 

Stefan Vogel 259-9402 

Office Staff 

(Mrs.) Solveig Parsons Secretary, Smith School 
(Mrs.) Ruth Gaynor 

Principal, Hanscom School 

Robert A. Leach 274-7720 

Office Staff 

(Mrs.) Lucille Needham Secretary, Hanscom School 
(Mrs.) Lorraine Wells 



200 



SCHOOLS 

Principal. Hartwell School 

(Mrs.) Joan B. Warren 259-9404 

Office Staff 

(Mrs.) Doris Bardsley Secretary, Hartwell School 
(Mrs.) Kathryne Palmer 

Resigned in 1964: (Mrs.) Mary Bach, Hanscom School 

(Miss) Frances R. Gardella, 
Superintendent's Office 

Hours - School Offices 

8:15 a.m. - 4:15 p.m., Monday through Friday 

Administrative Assistant 

George Drake Center School 259-9401 

School Nu r s e s 

(Mrs.) Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 259-9407 

Lincoln Schools 
(Mrs.) Gladys Crumb, R. N. 274-7723 

Hanscom School 

Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 

John J. Carroll Center School 259-9401 

Cus t od ians 

John Biondo Brooks School 

Nelson Palumbo Brooks School 

Ralph Weatherbee Center and Smith Schools 

Festus Armstrong Hartwell School 

Harold Cuttell Hartwell School 

Atwell Williams Hartwell School 

John Florio Hanscom School 

Daniel O'Leary Hanscom School 

Harold Swift Hanscom School 

Oscar De Conto Smith School 

Resigned in 1964: Frank Cole 

Telephone Numbers 

Office of the Superintendent 259-9400 

Offices of the Principals: 

Hartwell School 259-9404 

Hanscom School 274-7720 

Smith School 259-9402 

Brooks School 259-9408 

Administrative Assistant 259-9401 

Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 259-9401 

Nu r s e s : 

Lincoln (Mrs. Garrison) 259-9407 

Hanscom (Mrs. Crumb) 274-7723 



201 



SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Perry J. Culver, M. D., Chairman 

Helen Gilfoy 

C. DeWitt Smith 



In this era of national concern with im- 
proving education, the townspeople of Lincoln 
should inquire into the quality of education in 
the Lincoln Public Schools. There are no ob- 
jective standards by which a school system may 
be measured; but there are many indications that 
professional educators and other informed critics 
have a high regard for the Lincoln Schools, 

Visitors from many near and distant places 
are directed here by the State Board of Education 
and the neighboring university Schools of Educa- 
tion, Graduate students of school administration 
at the Harvard School of Education have made a 
thorough study of the Lincoln Schools and report 
that our school system is one of the best in New 
England. The quality of educational environment 
in Lincoln is well known to prospective teachers. 
In 1964 there were more than three hundred appli- 
cations for teaching positions in Lincoln from the 
best students of the schools of education; only 
thirty places were available. 

Perhaps the most concise description of the 
Lincoln Schools can be quoted from the Chicago 
Tribune Sunday Magazine of July 26, 1964. "Evo- 
lution + Innovation = Excellence. This kind of 
school system had to happen. Educators for years 
have been moving toward new methods which both 
serve the slow and challenge the quick, at no sacri- 
fice to the progress of the average learner. But 
it required a unique combination of community en- 
thusiasm and teacher enlightenment to finally bring 
it," Neither the faculty, the administration nor 
the school committee are complacent about our pres- 
ent status, but are working more diligently than 
ever for better and better education for each pupil. 



202 



SCHOOLS 



Opening of the new Brooks School with its 
core of invaluable central facilities such as 
auditorium, flexible large class teaching spaces, 
art, music and science areas has added an im- 
measurable impetus to our striving for excellence. 
Both the faculty and students radiate an enthusiasm 
for learning which has permeated the whole system. 
The campus plans of a lower primary school at Hart- 
well, a middle school at Smith and an upper school 
at Brooks is about to be realized. 

Beauty in the environment has not been over- 
looked. The architect planned for flexibility, 
economy, durability and beauty. A lovely setting 
for our schools is being achieved through the ef- 
forts of Mr. Max Mason, the Landscape Committee, 
and generous help from the services (Park and High- 
way) of the Town. 

Improvement in quality of physical facilities 
is being more than matched by advancement in curri- 
culum and faculty. Fourteen senior members of the 
faculty are now on full calendar year contracts. 
This makes it possible for them to devote all of 
their energies and skills to guiding the profession 
al growth of the younger faculty and in shaping an 
even better curriculum. Innovation of multi- 
discipline classes which will d ec ompar tment al ize 
education, the institution of periods for indepen- 
dent study that will lead to habits of lifelong 
education and possibly planning for the year round 
utilization of the school plant are all products 
of a faculty which looks beyond the immediacy of 
the next day's classes. The library, which is the 
foundation for learning, will continue to be one of 
the prime projects in our long-range planning. 

Quality education costs money; and generally 
people get about what they pay for. Your school 
committee submits that the Town of Lincoln is re- 
ceiving full value for what it spends. 

The following table shows that over the last 
five years almost all of the increase in the per 
pupil cost of education has gone into salaries. 



203 



SCHOOLS 



BUDGET PER PUPIL COST DATA. 1961 - 1965 

1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 

Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget 

10/60- 10/61- 10/62- 10/63- 10/64- 

Categor ies 894 920 971 973 1006 

Instruct ion 

Salaries $333.73 $373.22 $412.15 $437.37 $472.65 

All other 

Salaries 58.39 52.34 49.69 56.45 . 67.86 

Total 

Salaries 392.12 425.56 461.84 493.82 540.51 

All other 

Costs 133.05 134.52 131.59 143.82 143.34 

Total Town 

Budgets $525.17 $560.08 $593,43 $637.64 $683.85 



This is as it should be. Wise administration 
by the Superintendent and staff have improved the 
custodianship over non-salary expenditures so that we 
are able to increase the material support of our edu- 
cational program without significant increases in the 
per pupil cost. 

The Hanscom school is growing apace in size and 
quality. This continues to please both the families 
and staff of L. G, Hanscom Field and the citizens of 
Lincoln; moreover, the presence of the Hanscom school 
in the Lincoln System helps to bear the cost of school 
wide administration. 




204 



SCHOOLS 

buted countless hours to the Schools. Thanks to 
all who have given much time and thought to our 
joint goal. We are moving closer to it in our 
quest for greatness in education. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Robert L. F ilbin 

The year 1964 has seen a number of signifi- 
cant changes in the Lincoln Schools. For the 
first time in the history of the town the student 
enrollment has exceeded a thousand pupils. The 
October 1st enrollment count showed 1006 children. 
A similar kind of trend has been taking place at 
Hanscom School which is operated by the Lincoln 
Schools. The student enrollment there was 646 
pupils on October 1st. It is anticipated that 
there will be approximately 1033 pupils at Hans- 
com School by December of 1965 due to new housing 
which is being constructed for personnel stationed 
at Hanscom Field. This will bring the total 
school population to a number well over 2000. 

With the completion of the new Brooks School 
in the fall of this year the concept of a campus 
school system with a Primary School, a Middle 
School and an Upper School became a reality. This 
substantial building with its specialized teaching 
spaces for Science, Art and Music, its adequate 
general classroom wing and a large auditorium 
lecture hall makes it possible to carry on the edu- 
cational program of the schools more effectively. 
The present buildings, including Center School, will 
accommodate up to 1300 children at which point addi- 
tional buildings will be necessary. 

The increase in the number of students at 
Hanscom School calls for a new building to be com- 
pleted by the school year 1965-66. This building, 
which will be erected at the present Hanscom site, 
will be paid for by the federal government. At 
present it is in the design stage and construction 
is not expected to begin until July of 1965. 

The number of school personnel has increased 
significantly. The total number on the profession- 



205 



SCHOOLS 



al staff is 108 and on the non-teaching staff 27; 
a total of 135. It is expected the staff will 
increase in proportion to the student enrollment. 

Important additions to the faculty this year 
were Mr. Joseph Fallo, formerly Assistant Science 
Co-ordinator of the Lexington Public Schools, as 
Elementary Science Co-ordinator for the Town and 
Hanscom Schools, and Miss Carol Williams, elemen- 
tary music teacher for the Town and Hanscom Schools. 
Other staff changes within the schools are reported 
by the school principals in their reports which 
appear in another part of this report. 

The schools were recognized nationally in 
July of this year by the publication of two arti- 
cles in the Chicago Tribune. Written by Ruth 
Moss, Feature Writer for the Tribune, they were 
entitled "The Lincoln Schools - Evolution + Inno- 
vation = Excellence" and "The Battle to Make Words 
Behave", The former was reprinted by special per- 
mission from the Tribune as an edition of the 
"Weathervane" and mailed to residents of the Town 
late in the fall. This article dealt with the 
over-all school program and organization. The 
latter article dealt with Lincoln's reading program. 

The schools were once more recognized for 
their work in the teaching of modern mathematics 
through a grant from the Madison Project to con- 
tinue the work in the Hartwell School, Mrs, 
Elizabeth Bjork has been employed as teacher-con- 
sultant in mathematics and has contributed greatly 
to the over-all mathematics program. Through the 
cooperation of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School Committee and Superintendent, Mr, Alexander 
Marshall, Head of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School Mathematics Department, is acting as con- 
sultant to the Lincoln Elementary School Mathe- 
matics Committee, This committee, which is made 
up of representative mathematics teachers from the 
Lincoln Schools, has been at work up-dating, the 
over-all mathematics curriculum and co-ordinating 
it at the upper levels with that of the Regional 
High School and Bedford High School, Hanscom stu- 
dents attend the latter. Continued use of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 
Curriculum materials is being made at the Hartwell 



206 



SCHOOLS 



and Hanscom Schools under the direction of Mr, 
Joseph Fallo, Science C o-or d inat or . In addition, 
the schools through Mr. Fallo have been invited to 
participate in the School Science Curriculum Pro- 
ject of the University of Illinois. This is to 
be used with children ages 9 to 11 in Hartwell, 
Smith and Hanscom Schools. 

School wide study committees have been organ- 
ized, in addition, in the areas of Social Science 
and English to review current practices. Con- 
sultants from outside the school system will work 
with staff members to help develop understandings 
of some of the basic instructional problems in 
these subjects and to offer concrete suggestions 
for improvement. 

Vital to any school system is the quality of 
its teaching staff and the ideas and enthusiasm 
they bring to their work. Ma ny of the improve- 
ments which have come about in the schools stem 
directly from the professional inquiry and inter- 
est of the staff. As Mrs. Moss commented in her 

article on the schools "teachers must throw 

away their clocks. In Lincoln the teachers are 
at work before 8, and planning and appraisal keep 
them there long after the late bus has taken the 
children home. Although classes are dismissed 
at noon each Wednesday, there is no time off for 
teachers. They reevaluate, regroup, review films 
or new curriculum materials. In fact, the time 
when the children are not in school can be the 
most important hours of their week". 

Some problems which continually confront us 
are those of effectively providing instruction to 
meet the wide range of individual differences, of 
providing instructional materials to meet these 
needs, in identifying special abilities and talents 
in children, and helping them to develop these 
abilities and talents with all of the resources at 
our d isposal . 

The staff, through the use of a variety of 
materials and teaching techniques, continues to 
meet these needs. Large group instruction, small 
group instruction, the use of teaching devices such 



207 



SCHOOLS 

as taped materials, programmed texts, individual 
study, the use of films, filmstrips, television, 
manipulative devices, kinescopes, the school 
libraries and the use of resources in the general 
community have been some of the means used. 

The use of programmed instruction in the 
areas of Reading, Social Studies, Math, English 
and other subjects designed to permit individuals 
to learn and move at their own learning rate will 
be used on an experimental basis in 1965 with se- 
lected groups of children. In preparation for 
this, the staff with over-all responsibilities for 
curriculum, visited schools in Connecticut and New 
York where this kind of material has been used for 
two years to observe its use and to consult with 
staffs there concerning it. 

Another major effort in 1965 will be that of 
providing supplementary instruction by specialists 
on the staff for those children who have particular 
abilities in the various subject matter areas. 
This was done during the summer school this year 
when Dr. Bennett, Director of Music, worked with 
children with a special aptitude in music. It is 
hoped this kind of instruction can be developed 
more fully in other areas as well, 

Constant re-appraisal and adaptability are 
necessary to maintain an educational program of 
quality. As brought out in the report of the 
Massachusetts Education Study Commission, technol- 
ogy, mobility and urbanization are effecting and 
will continue to effect modern education. It 
points out that Route 128 circles Boston like "the 
perimeter of a plate". (It also borders Lincoln.) 
As it absorbs more and more business and industry 
requiring higher and higher levels of skill, more 
education for all people becomes an imperative. 

It is the view of the commission that "needed 
improvement and required investment in education 
must be set against the backdrop of technology, 
mobility and urbanization if public education is 
to fulfill its public trust". 

These problems have implications for the Lin- 
coln Schools as well as other schools in the Com- 



208 



SCHOOLS 



monwealth and the nation. As we move ahead into 
the second half of the 1960's, this must be kept 
in m ind . 

In going about improvement and necessary 
change, the words of Sterling McMurrin, former 
U. S. Commissioner of Education, in his report to 
the Massachusetts Education Study Commission, will 
be a source of help. He writes: "So when the 
question is asked, what is the purpose of educa- 
tion, what are its ends, to what are the commit- 
ment and energies of our schools properly directed, 
the answer must be sought across the total spectrum 
of human interest, experience and value. It con- 
cerns first the well being of the individual and 

student But it concerns as well the 

strength of the Nation And it concerns the 

quality of the culture The question of edu- 
cation is nothing less than the question of how we 
are to achieve and preserve a genuinely free society 
in which men are authentic persons who are masters 
rather than slaves of the forces that shape the 
world and where there is culture in which the spirit 
of man can flourish freely and whose vitality is 
not a threat of decline and disintegration but 
promises a future of even greater achievement". 



PRINCIPALS, HARTWELL, SMITH AND BROOKS SCHOOLS 

(Mrs.) Joan B, Warren, Principal, Hartwell School 
Stefan Vogel, Principal, Smith and Brooks Schools 

STAFF 

The teaching staff of Hartwell School consists 
of thirty teachers, twenty-six of which are full- 
time with four teaching part-time. Of the full- 
time staff twenty-three are assigned to teams with 
one specialist each in library, art and physical 
education. Of the four part-time teachers, two 
are assigned to the teams with one specialist each 
in reading and math. 

The total teaching staff of Smith and Brooks 
Schools is thirty, twenty-eight of which are full- 
time teachers with two teaching part-time, one as 
reading consultant and the other as lay reader in 
the English Department. 

209 



SCHOOLS 



In addition to the above stated totals, seven 
full-time teachers are shared with the Smith, 
Brooks, Hartwell and Hanscom Schools, as is a part- 
time speech therapist. 

Of the sixty-eight full and part-time members 
of the teaching staff, eighteen represent replace- 
ments in faculty, and three represent the creation 
of new positions: an elementary science co-ordina- 
tor for Teams R-N, a physical education teacher 
for Hartwell and Smith, and a part-time math 
specialist co-ordinating Teams R-N, 

Members of the faculty at Hartwell, Smith and 
Brooks Schools continue to distinguish themselves 
through educational contributions within as well 
as outside the Lincoln School System. As of this 
writing, the following teachers: Mr. Richard Cowell, 
Mrs. Phyllis McKenney, Mrs. Jean Shub and Mrs. 
Catherine Mitchell are acting as consultants and/or 
try-out teachers for The Children's Museum of Bos- 
ton, which is conducting curriculum materials 
studies under a federal grant. Mr. Cowell is also 
associated with the Harvard Social Studies Curricu- 
lum Center . 

The following teachers: Mrs. Marguerite New- 
berg, Mr. Neil Jorgensen and Mr. Christopher Hale 
are contributing to curriculum improvement in sci- 
ence and Mrs. Carol Nassab and Mr. David Conrad in 
the social studies in conjunction with Educational 
Services, Inc. of Watertown, Mass, 

An article by Mrs. Helen Horn on new art mater- 
ials was published in the School Arts magazine last 
year, and an article on the teaching of history by 
Miss Betsy Thompson is soon to be published in The 
Independent School Bu 1 1 e t i n . 



BUILDING UTILIZATION 

The new unit for Hartwell School was made 
available by the opening of school in September 
and Team R (98 five year olds) took up residence 
in this new facility. The two middle rooms known 
as "the Common Room" are used not only by Team R, 
but daily by a reading group (Team 0) and physical 



210 



SCHOOLS 

education classes. Other activities (particularly 
involving large groups) are scheduled as the need 
arises. Having this multi-purpose space available 
alleviates our most pressing problem of the past 
few years. Team (125 pupils) is housed in Unit 
A and Team G (116 pupils) in Unit B. The main 
building houses Teams Y (104 pupils) and Team B 
(113 pupils). The library has moved from the 
lobby to a classroom and for the first time chairs 
and tables are part of this set-up, thus insuring 
a more effective program particularly for the two 
older teams. The multi-purpose room is no longer 
used for reading groups, and therefore is available 
for large group activities as well as physical edu- 
cation classes. 

Smith School now houses Team N and grade 6. 
Team N is located in the south wing of the school 
and consists of 118 students. Grade 6, with 117 
students, is housed in the main wing of the build- 
ing. Seventh and eighth graders are based in 
Brooks School with 118 seventh graders and 98 
eighth graders. A total of 451 students are en- 
rolled in Smith and Brooks Schools, representing 
an increase of 39 students over last year's enroll- 
ment . 

Certain facilities are shared between the 
two schools. Team N and grade 6 pupils make use 
of the lecture hall, auditorium, music and art 
areas in Brooks School, while 7th and 8th graders 
have Physical Education, Home Economics, Shop and 
French in Smith School. Both groups make exten- 
sive use of the central library. The recently 
completed covered walkway has been a welcome addi- 
tion for those travelling between schools. 

Students and staff are very appreciative of 
the excellent facilities provided by Brooks School. 
The smaller wing at Brooks School is used pri- 
marily for English and History classes. The 
faculty offices and conference area provide an ex- 
cellent climate for staff work, and the students 
are making worthwhile use of the study cubicles. 
The larger Brooks building houses mathematics, two 
fine science laboratories, an excellent double art 
suite, and a music room with its own rehearsal 
stage and practice rooms. Also located here are 



211 



SCHOOLS 

the auditorium and lecture hall and a number of 
study carrels in which students may work inde- 
pendently . 

The additional space offered by Brooks School 
has enabled us to make good use of space now avail' 
able at Smith School. One room is now devoted to 
remedial work; another to care for the overflow of 
Home Economics projects; one is an activity room 
for the 6th grade (large group projects, small 
group work, meetings, and recently, a student 
museum exhibit); and another room is now used pri- 
marily for French classes, in which the language 
laboratory is housed. A major improvement in 
space allocation has been the elimination of the 
need for using science and art rooms as homerooms. 



ORGANIZATION 

Hartwell School continues in its fourth year 
of organization as a non-graded team teaching 
school. For this current school year, the size 
of teams ranges from 98 to 125 pupils with from 
three to six teachers assigned per team. Mrs. 
Jane Stewart continues as Team Leader for Team R, 
Mrs. Julia Cole has the responsibility for both 
Teams Y and B, with Mrs. Peggy Turner, Senior 
Teacher for Team Y, and Miss Phyllis Johnson, 
Senior Teacher for Team B. Miss Patsy Lamb re- 
places Mrs. Betty Bjork as Team Leader for Team G 
and Mrs. Joan Bennert serves as Senior Teacher. 
Mrs. Marguerite Newberg continues in Team with 
Miss Diane Furber as Senior Teacher. Team Leaders 
meet at least weekly with teachers in their res- 
pective teams and weekly with the principal to in- 
sure improved communication in all phases of school 
life. 

Team N continues as a full teaching team under 
the guidance of Mr. Joseph Lessard , Team Leader, 
and Mrs. Phyllis McKenney, Senior Teacher. The 
housing of this group in Smith School has increased 
effectiveness in the following programs: library, 
physical education, music and art, which in the 
past have had to contend with difficulties incurred 
by the physical separation of Team N (once in Cen- 
ter School) from the rest of the school. 



212 



SCHOOLS 

Gr ade 6 continues as a departmentalized 
teaching team under the direction of Air. David 
Conrad as Team Leader and Mr, Christopher Hale 
as Senior Teacher. With the exception of two 
teachers (one teaches one math group in Team N, 
and another teaches two 7th grade classes), the 
others instruct only in the 6th grade. 



on 



Grades 7 and 8 are organized academically 
a departmental basis, and may be viewed as 
overlapping teams. Teachers in grades 7 and 8 
instruct only in these grades, although depart- 
ment heads have responsibilities in grades 6-8. 
Co-ordination and improvement of curriculum is 
handled in departmental meetings, inter-depart- 
mental meetings, special study groups, and in bi- 
weekly meetings of the Faculty Council, - which 
includes representatives from all instructional 
areas. Co-ordination of student activities and 
problems (guidance) are handled in weekly meetings 
of the teams, and in bi-weekly meetings of the team 
leaders with the principal. 



SUMMER SESSION 



INSTRUCTIONAL 



The summer session of July, 1964, with 90 
students receiving extra help, also produced im- 
portant advances in curriculum and teaching method. 
To cite some of these: 

1. Study group in Social Studies (Hartwell) in- 
vestigated current programs and met with an 
outside consultant, Dr. Gil Wilson of Boston 
University, coming up with a proposal for ex- 
perimental program to be used in Team Y. 
This study group will continue to meet during 
the school year to work on improvement of 
curriculum in this area. 

2. Curriculum in the Social Studies (N-8) re- 
vised and published. 

3. Correlation of F lglish and History for the 
8th grade this year. 



213 



SCHOOLS 

4. Language Arts curriculum revised and pub- 
lished (Teams R-0). This will be used 
during the current year and evaluated be- 
fore official adoption. 

5. Standardization of doing research reports 
for Teams through Grade 8. 

6. Experimental use of the language laboratory 
resulting in a special project for this year 
in the English Department (grades 6-8). 

7. Inclusion of new science co-ordinator on 
summer school staff who worked along with 
several team members rewriting science units 
for use in Teams B, G and 0, 

8. Attendance of several staff members at the 
NASA Workshop in Framingham, Mass, 

9. Adoption of SRA Greater Cleveland Mathematics 
Program in Teams R-N. 

10. A semi-programmed unit in mathematics devel- 
oped by a math study group (grades 7 and 8). 

11. Preparation of transparencies for use in 
overhead projectors. 

12. Study guides, taped materials and various 
units developed. 

13. The development of a philosophy of approach 
based on research about si ower -learn ing chil- 
dren in science; 6 units worked out for these 
classes. (Grades 7 and 8). 

14. An improved art curriculum; certain pro- 
cesses specified and explained; continuity 
and sequence strengthened, 

15. Music curriculum revised; experimental work- 
shop with a select group of students con- 
ducted; continued work on the cataloging of 
record s . 

16. Physical Education curriculum further de- 
veloped with specific plans for the coming 
year . 

214 



SCHOOLS 



ACADEMIC SCHOOL YEAR 1964-1965 

A Spalding Workshop for all new teachers, 
Teams R through grade 7, was held September 1-4 
at Hartwell School with Mrs. Adrienne Rubin con- 
ducting the in-service workshop course which proved 
to be invaluable to all concerned. 

In addition to the instructional changes and 
improvements resulting from the summer session, 
the following warrant mention: 

Hartwell and Smith School: Teams R-N 

1. Use of SRA Math Program and continuation 
of the Madison Enrichment Program. All 
math in Teams R-N is co-ordinated by Mrs. 
Betty Bjork who not only teaches and super- 
vises, but also holds periodic in-service 
meet ings . 

2. Use of SRA Social Studies Program, Our 
Working World , on trial basis on Team Y. 
This is an economic-based program extremely 
well organized. 

3. Co-ordination of the Science curriculum by 
Mr. Joseph Fallo who is available to con- 
sult and teach in Teams R-N. 

4. Increased use of the large group method of 
instruction in English, Social Studies and 
Science (Team N). 

5. Employment of an additional physical educa- 
tion teacher resulting in an improved physi- 
cal education for Teams and N, and in a 
more effective after-school sports program. 

Smith and Brooks School: Grades 6. 7 and 8 

Reorganization of three si ower -mov ing classes, 
two in the 6th and one in the 7th grade which re- 
sults in the teaching of both English and Social 
Studies by the same teacher. This approach is de- 
signed to provide an improved program for helping 
students to better develop their English skills as 



215 



SCHOOLS 



the teacher can effectively include such skills 
in the Social Studies program. 

English and Social Studies 

1. Increased use of large group instruction, 
use of tape recorders in English classes 

for oral reading improvement and more atten- 
tion to small group needs when desirable. 

2. In social studies, active work with The 
Children's Museum in helping to develop 
specific materials relating to studies of 
Indians and Greece. 

3. A try-out of an American Revolution unit 
developed last summer at ESI in Watertown 
in which two staff members participated. 

Mathemat ics 

1. The mathematics study group is continuing 

to evaluate and to further develop materials 
based on the SMSG math program which will 
increasingly provide students with opportun- 
ities to move at their own rate, and for 
teachers to work with small groups when de- 
s irable . 

Sc ience 

1. Work with ESI in Watertown in the develop- 
ment of experimental units. Mr, Donald 
Ford, now employed by ESI, taught two of 
these units last fall, - one in the 8th 
grade and one in the 6th grade. 

2. Mr. Neil Jorgensen and Mr. Christopher Hale 
will be using some of the ESI. Sampler Units 
on a trial basis this year. Sampler units 
are those being given their final classroom 
test prior to marketing for sale to schools. 

Schedul e 

1. Certain changes made last year have been in- 
corporated into this year's schedule: 



216 



SCHOOLS 



a. Double periods continue to be provided 
where the need exists: Art, Science, 
Home Economics and Shop, and some in 
English, History and Math. 

b. Excepting Social Studies, all staff 
members have planning time co-ordinated 
such that departmental meetings may be 
held once a week during the school day. 

c. The study periods have been consolidated 
into three activity periods at the end 
of the day for grades 7 and 8, and one 
for 6th grade. During these periods, 
the following are now possible during 

sc hool hour s : 

Stud y 

Orchestra - Chorus (Boy's and Girl's) 

Library use - (individual basis) 

Student Council and Committee meetings 

Lincoln Leger 

Extra help in certain areas 

Boys*. Cooking and Girls' Shop (Grades 

7 and 8) 
Grade level student meetings 



PRINCIPAL, HANSCOM SCHOOL 

Robert A. Leach 

Following a continued pattern of growth and 
expansion, Hanscom School has operated this year 
at full building capacity. In addition, it has 
been necessary to rent two rooms at the Center 
School in Lincoln to accommodate our kindergarten 
cl as se s . 

STAFF 

Our present staff consists of 40 full and 
part time teachers. In addition our staff has 
worked with Boston University and Lowell State 
College in their respective teacher training pro- 
grams. These highly-qualified young profession- 
als are meeting the educational needs of approxi- 

217 



SCHOOLS 

mately 650 students. This enrollment figure repre 
sents a gain of 75 students over the last year's 
opening figure. 



ENROLLMENT AND BUILDING PLANS 

Construction of 200 additional units in the 
base housing area, now well underway, will cause a 
projected enrollment increase of approximately 300 
students starting next September. Under construc- 
tion at this time is a building which will contain 
the equivalent of 12 classroom spaces, a health room 
and administrative office space. This building 
will be sited adjacent to our present kindergarten 
wing and will house a greater part of our primary 
unit. In addition, facilities for a gymnasium, or 
all-purpose room, will be built near the wing of the 
building presently housing our upper levels, grades 
6 through 8. Cafeteria expansion and additional 
storage areas are also a part of the current phase 
of construction. 



INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM 

Several innovations in our instructional pro- 
gram have taken place this year. In conjunction 
with Hartwell and Smith Schools, Hanscom School con 
ducted a pre-school reading workshop for new teach- 
ers and substitutes, under the direction of Mr s . 
Charlotte Rothstein, our reading supervisor. This 
endeavor has proved to be a very successful one and 
we plan to continue this approach next year. An- 
other successful reading workshop, this one for our 
parents, was completed last fall. A ten week work 
shop in modern math for parents, an adult evening 
art class, and a woodworking class for parents have 
rounded out an interesting program of adult educa- 
tion . 



SUMMER WORKSHOP 

Our summer school workshop this past year pro- 
vided an opportunity for introducing several re- 
visions to our instructional program and the sched- 
uling format at the upper levels. A major revision 



218 



SCHOOLS 

in scheduling of our academic subjects at grades 
6 through 8 has resulted in a greater flexibility 
for varied project work by subject-area teams. 
By scheduling a larger time block of 90 minutes once 
each week in major subject areas, daily meetings of 
classes have been reduced from 5 to 4 times a week. 
In turn, this has allowed our special subject teach- 
ers to meet with upper level classes more frequent- 
ly in morning sessions, thus freeing them for more 
afternoon class meetings with elementary or primary 
groups. The use of so called "prime" morning time 
for music and art at the expense of reading and 
arithmetic is now avoided, to a large extent. 
Varied groupings, individual and group project work 
characterize classes meeting in these large time 
blocks. 



a 



Another significant change this year in our 
upper level math program has included the use of 
laboratory approach, based upon programmed SMSG Math 
materials. A joint committee of math instructors 
from Smith, Hartwell and Hanscom developed this in- 
dividualized approach with one unit of SMSG material 
during the summer workshop. This individualized 
method of teaching some rather new and difficult 
material is of great value to our Hanscom students, 
particularly those who are transferred to us during 
the school year. The work may be covered by each 
individual student at his own pace, rather than at- 
tempting to "catch up" with a given class upon en- 
rolling in our school. 

Our individualized reading program for all 
levels, utilizing the facilities of our library, 
has been expanded this year following work in our 
summer school session. Also new units in our so- 
cial studies program were completed at the inter- 
mediate levels. 



PARENT SUPPORT AND HSA ACTIVITIES 

One of the rewarding aspects, from the stand- 
point of our staff and administration, has been the 
active interest of our parents in our school program. 

Our room mothers have rendered invaluable aid 
in scheduling conferences and assisting staff members 



219 



SCHOOLS 

in planning various room activities. In addi- 
tion to helping our librarian and nurse with 
their programs this year, our parents have given 
generously of their time serving as bus mothers 
for our kindergarten classes at Center School. 

Our Hanscom School Association, patterned 
after the LSA, has been most active and helpful 
in supporting many school activities during the 
year. Because of the large influx of new families 
in base housing last summer, an orientation meeting 
for parents enrolling their children for the first 
time at Hanscom was held last September prior to 
the opening of school. This affair was very well 
attended and was followed by an orientation tea for 
kindergarten parents, held in the basement rooms at 
Center School. These initial meetings are being 
followed by four general membership meetings held 
on alternate months during the school year. 



FUTURE PLANS 

The limits of the future growth and expansion 
of Hanscom School are yet to be defined. We ex- 
pect to have nearly 1000 students enrolling at Hans- 
com next fall as a result of the additional new 
housing units. This increased enrollment will be 
reflected by the fall of 1966 with a junior high 
student body of approximately 300 students. This 
in turn, would seem to indicate the necessity for 
the planning of additional junior high school facil- 
ities, perhaps planned in connection with the build- 
ing of the gymnasium wing included in the present 
phase of construction. Thus we may expect to see 
a sizeable complex of school buildings at Hanscom 
which will house at least one half of the school 
population of the Lincoln School system in the near 
future. We look forward to these developments with 
great interest. 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Alice E. Garrison, R. N. 

In September all children, kindergarten through 
8th grade, were weighed and measured with the assist 



220 



SCHOOLS 

ance of Mrs. Torode, Miss Butz, and Mr. Reed, our 
physical education instructors. There are no 
children suffering from malnutrition in the Lincoln 
schools, but we encounter a number of cases of obes- 
ity in both boys and girls, especially in the upper 
grades. These cases are followed up and parents 
are advised to seek medical direction. 

Children entering kindergarten had the state 
required physical examination including smallpox 
vaccination. The majority were seen by their own 
family doctors. 18 kindergarten examinations were 
done by Dr. John Davies at the Well Child Conference. 

During October and November school wide dental 
screening was done by Dr. William Tingey. 332 chil- 
dren were referred to their own family dentists for 
treatment or orthodontia. 

In October and November, with the help of 
trained volunteers, the annual hearing testing pro- 
gram was completed. All initial failures are re- 
tested by Mrs. Garrison. There were 30 final fail- 
ures. Of these, 16 were children with known hear- 
ing loss who were already under a doctor's super- 
vision. The new cases were discussed with their 
parents and further testing by an ear specialist 
advised. These children are now under medical 
supervision and have preferential seating in the 
classroom when this is necessary. 

In January and February the annual vision 
screening was done, also by the same group of vol- 
unteers trained by the Department of Public Health. 
There were 49 final failures. 29 children were 
already under the care of eye specialists and most 
of these wear glasses. There were 20 new cases re- 
ferred for care and observation. 

In April the annual tuberculin testing at the 
six year old level was done by Dr. John Sisson, our 
school doctor. This year the Tine test was used 
instead of the Mantoux test which had been used in 
former years. The Tine test unit is disposable 
and eliminates the need for syringes and needles. 
This testing program is entirely voluntary and it 
is gratifying to be able to report that we get al- 
most 100% return on our permission slips to parents. 
This year 88 children were tested. There were no 



221 



SCHOOLS 



positive reactors. 

The Mental Health program continues under the 
supervision of Mrs. Rogers from the Walden Clinic 
in Concord. She is at the Lincoln schools every 
Thursday and sees teachers by appointment, has 
group meetings with teachers, observes children in 
the classroom, and has conferences with parents 
when requested. Principals and teachers feel that 
this professional direction is extremely valuable 
in helping with behavior problems or difficulties 
encountered in teaching emotionally disturbed chil- 
dr en . 

Mrs. Torode, Miss Butz , Mr. Reed and Mr. Saia 
have an excellent after school sports program which 
is open to any boy or girl who wishes to play. This 
is not just for the selected teams that compete with 
other schools, and it is a tribute to our enthusias- 
tic coaches that about 70% turn out for after school 
sports. At Smith and Brooks schools the girls play 
hockey in the fall, basket-ball in the winter, and 
soft ball in the spring. The boys have soccer, 
basket-ball and baseball. 

Again, as always, I wish to thank my splendid 
volunteers for the services they give to the school 
health program. Mrs, Tead is at the Hartwell 
school Monday, Tuesday and Thursday mornings, and 
is known and loved by the children to whom she ad- 
ministers first aid with tender, loving care. Mrs, 
David Ammen, Mrs. Stuart Avery, Mrs. Gordon Donald- 
son and Mrs. Ralph Ruocco have helped with the 
vision, hearing and dental screening, and because 
of their help these programs have run smoothly and 
efficiently . 



222 



SCHOOLS 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 19 6 4 



Joseph Dennis Algeo 

Mark Canfield Allen 

Robert Jordan Andrews 

Virginia Ashworth 

Peter Stephen Aveni 

Margaret Ann Avery 

Phyllis Ann Bel anger 

David Philip Braun 

Dorothy Catherine Bronson 

James C. Bryant 

Patricia Anne Buerger 

Frederick Vincent Campbell 

Stanley A. Cibel, Jr. 

David S. Clark 

Bettina Conley 

Lissa Coolidge 

Rebecca Parker Crawford 

Candyce Crockett 

Perry J. Culver, Jr. 

Louise Denese 

Charles Curtis Day 

Susan Margaret Delling 

Stephen Richard deMont 

Mary Louise Denehy 

Carl S. Dennis, Jr. 

Helen Perkins Dewey 

Paula Ann Delores Durnan 

Michael Richard England 

Lorraine Robin Farrell 

Ellen Ward Fisher 

Linda Gagne 

John Thomas Gary 

Teresa Rose Grande 

John Christopher Haartz 

Russell Landram Haden, III 

Ronald R. Hagopian 

Seth M. Hall 

Paul T. Hannemann 

George Bunson Henderson, II 

Gregory John Hendrick 

Emily McNear Herman 

Nancy Sherry Hoyt 

Richard C. Humphreys 

Carolee Johnson 



Dana Marie F. Kelley 

Wayne John Korhonen 

David Langton 

Nancy Lankhorst 

Kathleen F. Larson 

Nancy Hamilton Lawson 

Steven Daniel Lennon 

Winifred I. Li 

William H. Lutnicki 

Brian Joseph Lyons 

John Cummings MacLean 

James Denis Malloy 

Donald William Martini 

Candace Elissa Maxwell 

William Joseph Mayo 

Andrew Lehmann Miser 

Wendel Lee Miser 

Karen Frances Morey 

Louise Merriam Morgan 

Paul Richard Morse 

Carol Sheilah Moss 

Paul V. Moynihan 

Christopher G. Mu r p h y 

Robert L. Niles, Jr. 

Paul Alan Nystrom 

John Henry O'Brien, III 

Mark Sumner Olsen 

John F. Paino 

Linda Marie Panetta 

D i a n n e Ma r i e Pa r k 

Ellen Powell 

Thomas Edward Rawson 

Martha Knox Rosenwald 

Christine Curtis Schroeder 

Helen M. Seeley 

Catherine Tlumacki 

David Travers 

William Maitland Weiss 

Winston Wilson 

William Fryer Winchell 

Joanna Winship 

Elizabeth Wood 

Walter Gordon Woodington 

Charlene Lorraine Worsham 



223 



SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1965 



Classification 

ADMINISTRATION 
School Committee Ex. 
Salaries, Sup * t . & 

Seer etar ies 
Office &, Sup't »s Ex. 



OUT OF STATE TRAVEL 

INSTRUCTION 
Salar ies 
Summer Workshop 
Textbooks 
Library 
Supplies &. Other Ex. 



*Le 



ss 



P. L. 874 



OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES 
Health 
Tr anspor tat ion 



OPERATION & MAI NT. 

OF PLANT 
Custodial Salaries 
Fuel &, Utilities 
Supplies &, Drayage 
Ma intenance 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

ACQUISITION OF 

FIXED ASSETS 
New equipment 

PROGRAMS WITH OTHER 
SYSTEMS 

Tuition Special 

Class 

TOWN TOTALS 
Per Pupil Cost 



1964 Budget 1964 Expenses 



1 , 349 .00 



1965 Budget 
Requested 



$ 



1 ,252.97 



1 ,400.00 



19 ,129.00 




18, 646.05 


18 , 897.00 


2.0 20.00 




1 , 203.45 


2.020.00 


$ 22,490.00 


$ 


21 ,102.47 


$ 22,317.00 


$ 1,160.00 


$ 


1,017.12 


$ 1,930.00 


$426 ,000 .00 


$ 


420 , 430.10 


$475 ,487.00 


5 ,560.00* 




7, 267.12* 


2, 400.00 


1 , 688.00 




3,034.76 


2,836.00 


6, 320.00 




7, 357.98 


3 , 833.00 


18 .107.00 




16. 357.49 


27.076.00 


$457,675 .00 


$ 


454, 447.45 


$511,632.00 


5 .560.00 




7, 267.12 


10 .000.00 


$452,115.00 


$ 


447 , 180 .33 


$501 ,632.00 


$ 100.00 


$ 


50.63 


$ 1,100.00 


43.662.00 




42.785.10 


45 .941.00 


$ 43,762.00 


$ 


42,835.73 


$ 47,041.00 



$ 


35 , 852.00 


$ 


34,966.24 




28, 610.00 




27,808.70 




6 ,905.00 




5 ,034.33 




22,044.00 




24. 254.33 


$ 


93 ,411 .00 


$ 


92,063. 60 


$ 


200.00 


$ 


102.00 



$ 6 , 713.00 



$ 1,200.00 
$621 ,059 .00 
$ 637.64 



$ 45,970.00 

38 ,730.00 

5 , 250.00 

17.048 .00 

$106 ,998.00 



$ 



25J3.00 



5 ,549 .61 $ 5 ,983.00 



$ 1,040.00 $ 1,800.00 
$ 610,890.86 $687,951.00 
$ 627.20 $ 683.85 



224 



SCHOOLS 



STAFF ROSTER, JANUARY 1, 19 65 



Name 



Position 



Robert L. Filbin Superintendent of Schools 

(Principal, Hartwell School: 1958, 1959, 1960, ) 

( 1961, 1962; Principal, Smith School and ) 

( Co-ordinator of Instruction, 1962, 1963 ) 



Appointed 
1963 



Robert A. Leach 
Stefan Vogel 

Joan B. Warren 



Principal, Hanscom School 
(Teacher: 1954-1959) 

Principal, Smith/Brooks 
School s 

(Teacher: 1959-1963) 

Principal, Hartwell School 
(Teacher: 1951-1962) 
(Acting Principal: 1962, 1963) 



1959 



1963 



Josephine Alward 

♦Olive Barr 
Barbara Bennett 
Joan Bennert 
Lance Berger 

♦Elizabeth Bjork 
Rita Blackburn 
Pauline Borselli 
Eleanor Bowden 
Barbara Brackett 
Mary S. Butterfield 
Harriet Butz 
Alfred Callahan 
Roger Cederlund 
Francis Churchill 
Jul ia Cole 
David Conrad 

Priscilla Cowell 
Richard Cowell 
Allyson Crawford 
Caryl Culp 
Robert Cummings 
Frances Doughty 
George Drake 

Joseph Fallo 
Eleanor Feinberg 
Diane Furber 
Sarah Gallagher 
Donna Giberti 
Nancy Goff 
Kenneth Greenblatt 
Ronald Hadge 



Grade 3, C Cluster 1964 

Home Economics 1963 

Director of Music 1958 

Team G, Senior Teacher 1961 

Grade 6, History 1964 

Math Specialist 1958 

Team R 1962 

Physical Education 1964 

K Cluster, Chairman 1961 

Team 1964 

Ar t 19 6 3 

Physical Education 1963 

Manual Arts 1959 

Science, Mathematics 1962 

Manual Arts, Science 1963 

Leader, Team B 1955 
English, Senior Teacher, 

Grade 6 1962 

Grade 1, D Cluster Chairman 1962 

History, Department Head 1962 

Team R , 1964 

Grade 3, C Cluster 1964 

Team 1962 

Librarian 1959 

Administrative Assistant 1962 

(Teacher: 1954-1962) 

Science Co-ordinator K-5 1964 

Grade 2, E Cluster Chairman 1963 

Team 0, Senior Teacher 1956 

Grade 4, B Cluster 1964 

Mathematics 1963 

Sc ience 19 64 

Science, Mathematics 1959 

Mathematics 1959 



225 



SCHOOLS 



Name 



Pos it i on 



Christopher Hale 
Susan Hall 
Ela ine Heller 
Jill Holter 
Helen Horn 
Patricia Hurley 
*Lucia Hutchins 
Fred Iosue 
Judith Iversen 
Susan Jacobson 
Phyllis Johnson 
Catherine Jones 
Neil Jorgensen 
Linda Kahn 
Jean Kunze 
Patsy Lamb 
Ann Lessard 
Joseph Lessard 
Alan Lokensgard 
Ruth Mahoney 

Barbara Marley 
Phyllis McKenney 
Nancy Mead 
Cynthia Mendelson 
Wendy Miller 
Katherine Mitchell 
Barbara Morris 

Jean Morrison 
Margaret McWade 
Carole Nassab 
Marguerite Newberg 
William Nockles 
♦Marianne Palmer 
Ann Paranya 
Wanda Pearle 

Albert Reed 

Sheila Robbins Reid 
David Rivers 
Judith Rollins 
Charlotte Rothstein 
*Adrienne Rubin 
George Saia 
Doris Salak 
Mary Salvucci 
Marcia Schaab 
Myrna Schreibman 
Mina Shub 
Loretta Silvestri 
Michael Sims 
Augusta Sisk 
Mary Small 



Sc ience 

Grade 2, E Cluster 

Grade 3, C Cluster 

Kindergarten 

Director of Ar t 

Grade 2, E Cluster 

Remedial Reading 

Physical Education 

Gr ade 3, C Cluster 

Team 

Senior Teacher, Team B 

Libr ar ian 

Sc ience 

Team B 

Team Y 

Team G, Leader 

Team G 

Grade 5, Team Leader 

Mathemat ics 

English, Grade 7 Level , 

Chairman 
Team B 

Senior Teacher, Grade 5 
Grade 1, D Cluster 
Team Y 
Team B 
Gr ade 5 
Grade 5, B Cluster, 

Chairman 
Team Y 
Team G 
History 
Team 0, Leader 
Grade 4 
Team B 

English, Department Head 
English, History; F Cluster 

Chairman 
Director of Physical 

Educat ion 
Mus ic 
Grade 5 

Grade 2, E Cluster 
Remedial Reading 
Remedial Reading 
Physical Education 
Supernumerary 
Home Economics 
Grade 1 , D Cluster 
Team G 
Gr ade 5 
Team Y 
French 

Director of Testing 
Kindergarten 



Appointed 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1963 


1959 


1964 


1964 


1959 


1963 


1963 


1946 


1959 


1961 


1963 


1964 


1960 


1959 


1960 


1963 


1958 


1962 


1957 


1964 


1964 


1963 


1964 


1959 


1964 


1964 


1963 


1959 


1963 


1964 


1949 



1959 

1953 
1961 
1964 
1964 
1960 
19 59 
1964 
1959 
1955 
1964 
1963 
1964 
1964 
1962 
1946 
1964 



226 



Name 



SCHOOLS 



Pos i t i on 



Nancy Soscia 
Kathleen Spofford 

*Jane Stewart 
Florence Sullivan 
Ruth Sundberg 
Ann Sutherland 
Elizabeth Thompson 
Phebe Tonseth 
Lorraine Torode 
Robert Treanor 
Ronald Trudeau 
Suzanne Turner 
Pamela Tuttle 
Joan Walker 
Eugenie Wallas 

*Julia Wheelden 
Carol Williams 
Marilyn Woodall 
Ann Zanghi 



Art 

Grade 4, K Cluster 

Team R, Leader 

Grade 5, B Cluster 

English, History; K Cluster 

Fr ench 

English, History 

Libr ar ian 

Physical Education 

Art 

Mus ic 

Team Y, Senior Teacher 

Fr ench 

Ma thematics 

Grade 5, B Cluster 

Speech Therapist 

Mus ic 

Grade 1, D Cluster 

Team 



* Pa rt-time teachers 

On Leave of Absence for School Year 
1964-1965: Geneva Torrey 
Marian Hume 



Appointed 

1963 
1963 
1960 
1963 
1959 
1961 
1964 
1961 
1960 
1964 
1961 
1964 
1963 
1964 
1963 
1964 
1964 
1963 
1964- 



STAFF MEMBERS TERMINATED JUNE, 19 6 4 



Mary Carr 

Jo Ellen Crawford 

Helen Davidson 

Sheila Deitchman 

Ellen Dwinell 

Donald Ford 

Sally Stephenson Glass 

Mary Griffing 

Susan Clark Jorgenson 

Elizabeth Kellogg 

Elaine Messias 
Cecelia Miles 

Joan Hulme Perera 

Marion Remer 

Janet Saks 

Richard Salinger 

Elizabeth Sampson 

Anthony Sharkey 

Sarah Ott Shoemaker 
*Julie Steckel 

Evelyn Stevenson 

Gretchen Stubbins 

Adelaide Sugarman 

Sally Todd 
*Robert Weinberg 

Helen Wiser 

Ruth Zollinger 



D Cluster 

C Cluster 

of Sc ience 

E Cluster Chairman 

E Cluster 



Mathemat ics 
Team N 
Team Y 
Grade 1 , 
Gr ad e 3 , 
Director 
Grade 3 , 
Gr a d e 2 , 
Team G 
Team G 
Team N 
Music 
History 
Team 

Senior Teacher, Team R 
Team N 
Team 
Art 

Team Y 
Music 

Kindergarten 
Team Y 

Team Y, Senior Teacher 
Grade 1, D Cluster Chairman 
Speech Therapist 
Physical Education 
English, French; Grade 6 
Team Leader 



1963 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1961 
1959 
1961 
1962 
1961 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1960 
1962 
1959 
1963 
1963 
1962 
1963 
1961 
1962 
1961 
1961 
1962 
1963 

1959 



227 



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228 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
REPORT 
to the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1963 - 1964 



SCHOOLS 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Howard W. Emmons, Chairman 
James M. Jagger , Vice Chairman 
Joseph E. Brown 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Virginia K. Kirshner 
Henry M. Morgan 



Planning for the proposed second addition to 
the high school and the maintaining of high quality 
education have been the chief concerns of your Com- 
mittee during the past year. 

The architectural firm of Rich and Tucker 
Associates, Inc, of Boston was chosen for the pres- 
ent building phase. It was voted to develop a 
master plan for a complete school plant for 3,000 
students to be administered under the present centra 
lized system. The immediate addition will be de- 
signed for 1,800 students. The two towns at their 
respective special town meetings in October accepted 
the September 25th vote of the Regional School Com- 
mittee to borrow $2,460,000 "for the purpose of con- 
structing and equipping additions to the existing 
regional school building", making a total appropria- 
tion of $2,500,000, which includes the $40,000 plan- 
ning money approved in 1963. 

The new addition will include classrooms, a 
900 seat auditorium, a gymnasium, outdoor athletic^ 
facilities, library, new facilities for art and 
music, and added guidance and administrative space. 
It is planned for construction to start in the 
spring as the building must be ready for occupancy 
by September, 1966. 

We would once again like to thank the members 
of the building committee for the many hours of 
planning which they have so generously given to 
this project. Members of the committee are: Mrs. 
John M. Barnaby, Mr. Richard C. B. Clark and Mr. 
Edward G. Kaelber of Lincoln, and Mrs. Z. Stanley 
Taub, Mr. Burleigh Cruikshank, Jr. and Mr. Richard 
A. Schmalz of Sudbury. Mr. Kaelber resigned in 
September and Mr. E. Karl Bastress of Lincoln was 

230 



SCHOOLS 

appointed to replace him. Mr. Stephen E. Grande, 
Jr. of the Sudbury Permanent Building Committee 
has served as consultant. 

The new library planned for this building phase 
is being carefully considered by a committee of 
faculty and administration in cooperation with the 
architects and their library consultant. New tech- 
niques in library methods and use, number of vol- 
umes and their content in relation to the school 
curriculum, and needed library personnel are all 
being studied. The entire physical education and 
sports program has been given careful reevaluation 
during the planning for this building phase. 

The Leagues of Women Voters in both towns are 
currently making a study of the school 's future in 
all its ramifications. This study is enthusiasti- 
cally welcomed by the School Committee. 

Copies of the "Agreement between the Towns of 
Lincoln and Sudbury" are available at the Superin- 
tendent's office. It was also included in the 1963 
Town Reports. 

The administration of the Regional School Dis- 
trict and the Sudbury Elementary School system was 
separated last spring following the resignation of 
Superintendent C. Newton Heath from the Sudbury sys- 
tem. Mr . Heath was appointed full time Superinten- 
dent of the Regional District. 

This year saw a reclassification of all school 
budgets throughout the state in accordance with the 
accounting system now required by the Department of 
Education. This change will make future budget 
preparation and comparison more efficient and effect' 
ive . 

The educational policy of the high school was 
reevaluated and a revised Educational Policy Bulle- 
tin was sent to the citizens of both towns. 

The Committee continues its policy of annual 
meetings with as many of the school departments as 
possible. We also met with the Student Exchange 
Committee and with the officers of the P. T. S. A. 



231 



SCHOOLS 

Both programs, as presently constituted, have the 
continuing support of the Committee. A financial 
statement from the Student Exchange Committee fol- 
lows this report. 

The Driver Education program was evaluated this 
year, and in an effort to hold costs, it was voted, 
beginning in September 1964, to charge $24.00 for 
the on-the-road training aspect of the program if 
completed under the auspices of the school. This 
divides the burden equally between taxpayer and 
parents of driver education students. 

The series of tours of the building was con- 
tinued with one given for the League of Women 
Voters of both towns, and one for the officials of 
both towns. Our school, like all schools, is grow- 
ing rapidly and inevitably is losing some of the more 
intimate aspects of its early years. Every effort 
is being made, through guidance and small group 
activities, to keep the feeling of bigness in check, 

A high percentage of our graduating students 
continues to go on to further education. Eighty- 
four per cent of the class of 1964 entered two and 
four year colleges and other specialized schools. 

We would like once again to express our appre- 
ciation to the Administration and Faculty who con- 
tinue to maintain high standards and good spirit in 
our school . 



STUDENT EXCHANGE COMMITTEE OF THE P.T.S.A, 
Barbara Cryer, Chairman 



In this the seventh year of the student Ex- 
change Program, four students were sent abroad: 
William Clark to Japan, Christine DeBye to Germany, 
Margaret Weiss to Holland, and Electa Kane to 
Cevenol School in France. Two foreign students, 
Shirou Haraguchi from Japan and Margaret Barclay 
from Peru, attended Regional High School and, lived 
with families in both towns. In accordance with 



232 



SCHOOLS 



our policy these foreign students paid their own 
transportation costs, and living expenses were 
absorbed by the host families. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Balance on hand, September 1963 

Income : 

Benefits held by students 
Contributions : 
Parents of student 

ambas sad or s 
Local townspeople 



Expenditures : 

Two visiting foreign 
stud ent s : 
Towel fees, school lunches, 

insurance, miscellaneous 
Fee to International 
Student Placement Service 



$1 ,446.09 



$2, 241 .61 



540 .00 
2 . 703.00 5 .484. 61 



168 .55 



200 .00 
368 .55 



$6 , 930. 70 



Students to foreign countries: 
Experiment in International 

Living (three summer 

students ) 
One semester of school in 

France (transportation, 

tuition, board and room 

for one student) 



Printing and mailing of 
appeal letter 

Balance on hand, September 1964 



2,975 .00 



1.000.00 
3 , 975 .00 



90. 85 4 . 434. 40 



$2,496. 30 



233 



SCHOOLS 



THE LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Treasurer's Report 
December 31, 1964 



Total cash balance, January 1, 1964 

District Fund 
Cash balance, January 1, 1964 



Receipts : 

Lincoln Assessment 
Sudbury Assessment 
State reimbursement 

Building construction 
Transportation 
*Miscellaneous income 
U. S. Treasury Bills 
Temporary note 



Disbursements : 

Operating expense 

Debt Service - interest 

pr inc ipal 
U. S. Treasury bills 
Building Construction No. 3 

Cash balance, December 31, 1964 



196, 306 .45 
578, 329 .40 

63 , 265 .95 

66 , 830. 78 

7,892.61 

158, 748.98 

40.000 .00 



746, 


,876 


.65 


' 51, 


, 756 


.00 


130, 


,000 


.00 


158, 


,748 


.98 


36 , 


,080 


.95 



$ 193 , 856 .00 



$ 169,829.33 



1 . Ill , 374.17 
$1 , 281 , 203.50 



1 ,123,462.58 
$ 157.740.92 



* Miscellaneous Income 

Books $ 

Massachusetts Withholding 

Tax - Employer's re- 

imbur sement 
Driver education 
Interest on U. S. Treasury 

bills 
Library fines 
Telephone commissions 
Towels 
Tui t i on 

Vending machines 
Industrial arts 
Miscellaneous 



147.11 





64.11 




552.00 


1 


, 251 .02 




69 .00 




136.24 


2 


, 779 .50 


1 


,551 .68 




101.56 


1 


,009 .98 




230.41 



$7 , 892.61 



234 



SCHOOLS 

Cafeteria Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1964 $ 1,341.38 

Receipts $41,876.27 

Disbursements 3 7. 360.80 

Cash balance, December 31, 1964 5.856.85 

Athletic Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1964 $ 1.75 

Receipts $ 1,054.00 

Disbursements 825 . 00 



Cash balance, December 31, 1964 230.75 



Federal Reimbursement Funci, P. L. 864 

Cash balance, January 1, 1964 $ 10,638.58 

Receipts $5,846.23 

Disbursements none 

Cash balance, December 31, 1964 16.484.81 

Federal Reimbursement Fund. P. L. 874 

Cash balance, January 1, 1964 $ 11,257.77 

Receipts $23,750.00 

Disbursements 17.475.03 

Cash balance, December 31, 1964 17.532.74 



Adult Education Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1964 $ 366.99 

Receipts $ 1,312.32 

Disbursements 1.305.18 

Cash balance, December 31, 1964 374 . 13 



Music Scholarship Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1964 $ 420.20 

Receipts $ 325.00 

Disbursements 300 .00 
Cash balance, December 31, 1964 445 . 20 

Total cash balance, December 31, 1964 $ 198,665.40 



235 



SCHOOLS 

BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1964 

Assets 

Cash 

First National Bank $198,220.20 
Waltham Savings Bank 445 . 20 

Total Assets $ 198 , 665 . 40 

Liabilities and Reserves 

Appropriation balances: 
Non-revenue 

Building Construction No. 2 $ 1,891.13 

Building Construction No. 3 3,919.05 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Construction cost 63,265.95 

Transportation 66,830.78 

Federal Reimbursement, P. L. 864 16,484.81 

Federal Reimbursement, P. L. 874 17,532.74 

Surplus Revenue 21,834.01 
Revolving Funds: 

Cafeteria 5,856.85 

Athletic 230.75 

Adult Education 374.13 

Scholarship 445 . 20 

Total Liabilities and Reserves $ 198.665.40 

Outstanding Debt 

2.2% School Bonds payable $ 5,000 May 1, 1965- 

1975 inclusive $ 55,000.00 

2.4% School Bonds payable $20,000 November 1, 

1965-1974 inclusive 200,000.00 

2.4% School Bonds payable $50,000 November 1, 

1965-1975 inclusive 550,000.00 

3.7% School Bonds payable $50,000 May 1, 1965- 

1980 inclusive 800,000.00 

» 

2.2% Certified Notes payable $5,000 Nov. 15, 1965 

3,000 Nov. 15, 1966 8,000.00 

1.75% Certified Note payable $40,000 April 1, 1965 40,000.00 



$1 ,653, 000 .00 
George B. Flint, Treasurer 



236 



SCHOOLS 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
C. Newton Heath 

To the School Committee: 

This is the ninth Annual Report of the Admin- 
istration and reflects the continuance of Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School as a comprehensive 
secondary school dedicated to providing our youth 
with maximum educational opportunities to prepare 
them for their post-secondary objectives. Changes 
made in the administrative organization are ex- 
pected to enhance the effectiveness of the area of 
supervision. The position of business manager was 
changed from a fifty per cent to a full time res- 
ponsibility. The reorganization of the adminis- 
tration provided for a revision of job classifica- 
tions at administrative, supervisory, and secre- 
tarial levels of our school system. 

At the opening of school in September, 1964, 
ten of our previous staff members did not return: 
four left for further study, two left for profes- 
sional reasons, two left the teaching field, one 
left because of family responsibility, and one was 
not reappointed. Leave of absence was granted to 
three of our teachers to pursue a year of academic 
study . 

To an excellent staff we added the following 
members: Mr. Robert J. Andrews, art; Miss Barbara 
M. Athy and Mr. Kenneth Burt, physical education; 
Mrs. Barbara Brannen, home economics (part time); 
Mrs. Ouida L. Bailey, biology; Miss Lucille C. 
Brady, Spanish; Miss Peggy S. Cohen, French; Miss 
Mary S. Jemail and Mrs. H. Patricia Punchard, Eng- 
lish; Mr. Thomas J, Puchalsky, English and Latin; 
Mr. Albert Trottier, French; Mrs. Amy A. Kass and 
Mr. Richard E. Markham, history; Mr. Albert S. 
Palmer and Mr, Elmer F. Leonard, mathematics. Mr, 
William B. Galvin returned to our staff from an 
Academic Year Program in Mathematics at Harvard. 

In the area of the curricula offerings of the 
school, we have continued participation in the most 



237 



SCHOOLS 



recent studies and pilot programs in mathematics, 
physics, chemistry and biology. This past year 
we were invited to become one of three pilot 
schools in the teaching of earth science. During 
the past summer, members of our staff attended 
various institutes, while others accepted assign- 
ments in curriculum revision at our own high school. 
Certain teachers of English began work in the iden- 
tification of specific concepts in literature and 
composition. Once identified, it is planned to 
organize them into a handbook which will relate 
them to specific speeds by students of varying 
abilities and backgrounds. The completion of this 
project will require two more years. Routine re- 
vision of the history curriculum continued and new 
student syllabi were prepared. Gregg notehand and 
consumer economics have expanded our training of 
students in the business education area. 

Under the leadership of Principal, Dr. Leslie 
Tourville, Dr. Norman Cohen of the Framingham Men- 
tal Health Clinic, Dr. Gordon Winchell, our School 
Physician, members of the teaching staff, guidance 
personnel, and the school nurse, case studies have 
been instituted to better acquaint staff members in 
the area of mental health of students. It is ex- 
pected that a more effective program in mental 
health will evolve from this beginning. 

A major factor affecting the quality of in- 
struction is staff involvement in curriculum im- 
provement during the summer season. A school poli- 
cy which stresses such a high degree of individual 
student guidance and programming does not allow 
time during the regular school year for staff work 
in curriculum revision. Daily preparation, in- 
struction, and evaluation of results makes a full 
time assignment for staff members especially when 
teachers are carrying five teaching periods plus 
study hall, cafeteria supervision and other so- 
called extra-curricular duties. 

Currently, faculty study committees are re- 
viewing the following phases of our program: (1) 
A Library Committee is reviewing all phases of our 
present services and will propose a course of 
action whereby our future library services may be 



238 



SCHOOLS 

expanded and improved. (2) Students capable of 
pursuing advanced placement courses have been 
allowed to do so by arrangement with the subject- 
matter teacher. The present size of our enroll- 
ment, coupled with our anticipated growth, may re- 
quire us to formalize an advanced placement program. 
A staff committee is studying such a program. (3) 
In a comprehensive high school the curriculum offer- 
ings for the slower learner are vital. With about 
twenty per cent of our enrollment non-college bound, 
the study of a sound and profitable program for 
this student-segment of our school is required. 
Therefore, a faculty group is reviewing our present 
courses for the purpose of implementing and expand- 
ing the present offerings to more adequately pro- 
vide for the needs of our terminal students. (4) 
A committee is exploring the need for and feasi- 
bility of providing a summer session for those of 
our students who would elect to attend. (5) Pro- 
grams in the humanities are increasing throughout 
the secondary schools of the country. These pro- 
grams are taking many forms of organization but all 
of them place a greater emphasis on the correlation 
of all phases of the non-scientific courses and 
stress the importance of man's heritage from the 
arts, music, history, language , philosophy and an- 
thropology. As a phase of its professional under- 
takings, the Teachers* Association has assigned a 
committee to study this topic and recommend a 
course of action to the administration. (6) Many 
aspects of our present operation are being reviewed 
by a "Sounding" Committee working under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Tourville. This group is organized to 
explore problems arising from our operational rout- 
ines. The foregoing faculty study groups are 
assisting in matters vital to educational policy 
for the future development of our school. This 
type of professional activity is praiseworthy and 
reflects the excellent calibre of our staff and its 
dedication to the educational development of our 
youth. 

Under the able direction of Mr, Henry Zabierek, 
an effective self-supporting program of adult edu- 
cation has been in operation. Offerings in wood- 
working, ceramics, modern mathematics, investments, 
Russian history, developmental reading, geology, 



239 



SCHOOLS 

sewing, tailoring and French have been well sub- 
scribed. We look forward to an expansion of 
this phase of our educational program. 

The proposed addition to our school plant has 
required a major block of time to be devoted by 
administration and staff. However, such time has 
contributed in no small way to the end that we be- 
lieve our proposed new teaching facilities will re- 
flect the most modern of adaptations in terms of 
our instructional objectives. The new additions 
are being designed to accommodate team-teaching, 
large and small group instruction, tutorial work, 
and many provisions to emphasize self -learning 
and independent study as well as the traditional 
classroom teacher-directed activities. 

As noted in the annual report of Dr. Tourville: 
"A summary of the year's activities would 
not be complete without noting the growth of the 
school library. Over fourteen hundred new books 
were added to the existing collection, while cir- 
culation of books averages over three hundred per 
week. The library has been open to students from 
7:45 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. and a trial period of 
summer openings was made during the month of July, 

"In the area of Languages, student interest 
remains strong with over seventy per cent of all 
students in the school pursuing studies in French, 
Spanish, German or Latin, 

"In examining the overall operation of the 
high school during 1963-64 we find that our school 
drop-out rate has shifted from a high of 4,8 per 
cent in 1957-58 to a low of 1,1 per cent in the 
present year. An analysis of the work load of 
our students reveals that over sixty-five per cent 
of them carry five major subjects meeting twenty- 
five periods per week. About forty per cent of 
all students in the school carry a load of five 
academic major subjects in the areas of English, 
History, Science, Mathematics and Foreign Language. 
In addition all carry a minor of Physical Education 
classes twice per week." 



240 



SCHOOLS 



The statistics which follow are provided by 
Mr. Paul Vernon, Director of Guidance: 

"The data acts as one check by which we 
may quickly measure growth and progress. How- 
ever, the future success of the school will con- 
tinue to be a function of the efforts of our dedi- 
cated staff of professional teachers and counsel- 
lors. They have kept the school on the edge of 
the very latest in educational trends and develop- 
ments, modified and adapted to the specific needs 
of our students. In the midst of an educational 
revolution and a population explosion they have 
kept our school on the crest of each wave of 
change and improvement while striving to be con- 
cerned and involved with our students as individual 
human beings with varying needs. 



241 



SCHOOLS 



PLACEMENT OF 
THE LAST FIVE GRADUATING CLASSES 

Class of Class of Class of Class of Class of 
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 



4-year 

colleges 45 47.8% 63 53.4% 73 57.5% 90 60.81% 116 60.73% 



2-year 




















colleges 8 


8.5% 


10 


8.5% 


16 


12.5% 


13 


8.78% 


20 


10.4 7% 


Nursing 4 


4.3% 


7 


5.9% 


4 


3.1% 


3 


2.0 3% 


6 


3.14% 


Other 




















post- 




















secondary 




















schools 18 


19.1% 


12 


10.1% 


7 


5.5% 


10 


6.7 6% 


18 


9.4 3% 


Post- 




















graduate 




















work 2 


2.1% 


1 


. 8 5 % 


1 


.7 5% 


4 


2.70% 


3 


1.57% 


Married 


0.0% 


1 


.8 5% 


2 


1.5 0% 





0.0 0% 





0.0% 


Working 13 


13.9% 


19 


16.2% 


17 


13.10% 


25 


16.89% 


25 


13.09% 


Military 4 


4.3% 


5 


4.2% 


8 


6.0 5% 


3 


2.0 3% 


3 


1.57% 



94 100.0% 118 100.0% 128 100.0% 148 100.0% 191 100.0% 



PLACEMENT OF 
THE CLASS OF 19 6 4 

Admitted to Degree-Granting Institutions 
(116 students placed in 76 colleges) 

University of Massachusetts 13 

Northeastern University 7 

Boston Un iversity 5 

University of Chicago 5 

Boston College 3 

Skidmore College 3 

Bridgewater State College 2 

Fr amingham State College 2 

George Washington University 2 

Lycoming College 2 

Nebraska State College (Kearney) 2 

University of New Hampshire 2 

Salem State College 2 

Syracuse Un iversity 2 

Virginia Intermont College 2 

Worcester State College 2 

Assumption College 1 

Bates College 1 

Bentley College of Accounting &, Finance 1 



242 



SCHOOLS 

Boston Conservatory of Music 1 

Brigham Young University 1 

Colby College 1 

Colorado State College 1 

Colorado State University 1 

Colorado Women's College 1 

Columbia University 1 

Dakota Wesleyan University 1 

Dartmouth College 1 

Earlham College 1 

Fitchburg State College 1 

Gordon College 1 

Hamline University 1 

Hartwick College 1 

Harvard University 1 

Hobart College 1 

University of Illinois 1 

Lake Forest College 1 

Lowell State College 1 

MacMurray College 1 

University of Maine 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 

Me rriraack College 1 

Michigan College of Mining and Technology 1 

Michigan State University 1 

Morris Harvey College 1 

Mount Holyoke College 1 

Ne braska State College (Chadron) 1 

North Adams State College 1 

Norwich University 1 

Notre Dame College, Maryland 1 

Ohio Wesleyan University 1 

University of Oklahoma 1 

Parsons College 1 

Pembroke College 1 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

Un iversity of Pittsburgh 1 

Pratt Institute 1 

Randolph-Macon College 1 

University of Rochester 1 

Rockford College 1 

Simmons College 1 

Smith College 1 

University of Southern Mississippi 1 

St. Leo College 1 

Suffolk University 1 

Tufts University 1 

Union College 1 

Ur sinus College 1 

Wesleyan University 1 

West Virginia Wesleyan College 1 

University of Western Ontario 1 

Westfield State College 1 

Wheaton College 1 

Wheelock College 1 

Whitman College 1 

Wisconsin State College 1 



243 



SCHOOLS 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF 
COLLEGE PLACEMENT 



Class of 
1961 

Colleges in 
Massachusetts 29 - 46.1% 



Colleges in 
New England - 
outs ide of 
Massachusetts 

Colleges out- 
side of New 
England 



12 - 19.0% 



2 2 - 3 4.9% 



34 



Class of 
1962 



Class of 
1963 



Class of 
1964 



4 6.5 4% 3 - 3 3.3% 5 3 - 45.69% 



11 - 15.10% 18 - 20.0% 



8 - 6.9' 



28-3 8.36% 42-46.7% 55 - 4 7.41% 



ADMITTED TO JUNIOR, COLLEGES 



Wentworth Institute 
Vermont College 
Worcester Junior 

College 
Green Mountain 

College 
Colby Junior College 



5 

4 



Stockbridge School, 

Un i v . of Ma s s . 
Dean Junior College 
Paul Smith's College 
Sullins College 



2 
1 

1 

1 






ADMITTED TO NURSING SCHOOLS 



Framingham Union 

Hospital 
Children's Hospital 

School of Nursing 
North Shore Babies 1 

and Childr en * s 

Hospital 



Shepard Gill School of 
Practical Nursing 

St, Luke's Hospital, 
Pittsf ield 



ADMITTED TO OTHER POST -SECONDARY SCHOOLS 



Chandler 5 

East Coast Aero Tech 2 
Aquinas Secretarial 

School 1 

Bryant & Stratton 1 

Burdett College 1 

Floral school 1 
Greenfield Community 

College 1 



Katharine Gibbs 
Mansfield Academy 
Mount Ida Junior College 
Museum School, Boston 
Northeast Institute of 
Industrial Technology 
Stenotype Institute 






244 



SCHOOLS 

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 
QUALIFYING TEST 



"During their Junior year, one hundred and thirty- 
five members of the Class of 1965 took the National Merit 
Test. Seven of our students scored high enough to qualify 
as semi f inal is t s . These seven will compete for the honor 
of a coveted Merit Scholarship. Fifteen other students 
were runners-up and each will receive the next award, a 
Letter of Commendation. 

"Although no conclusions can be drawn from the follow- 
ing statistics, it is interesting to note the excellent 
quality of student performance in successive years." 



No. of Total % of total 
No. of winners of of class re- 
Class No. of semi- letters of award ceiving 
of Students finalists Commendation winners awards 



1959 


64 





1 


1 


1 .6% 


1960 


94 


2 


4 


6 


6 .2% 


1961 


118 


1 


6 


7 


6 .0% 


1962 


132 


4 


9 


13 


9 .8% 


1963 


152 


5 


19 


24 


15.1% 


1964 


186 


5 


16 


21 


11.3% 


1965 


191 


7 


15 


22 


11.5% 



. The successes we have attained this past year have 
been the result of a cooperative effort by all school per- 
sonnel: custodians, cafeteria workers, secretarial staff, 
professional staff, and citizen groups connected with the 
welfare of our school. I am grateful for their assist- 
ance and dedication. 



245 



SCHOOLS 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 19 64 
June 7, 1964 



Nancy Lee Adams 
Sarah Marlyn Adamson 
John Edward Algeo 
Nancy June Allen 
Linda Sweetlove Alley 
Jane Mills Anderson 
Patricia Mary Anderson 
Scott Francis Andrews 
William H. Aptt 
John William Austin 
Richard J. Av e n i 
Roger Coates Baldwin 
Charles Spencer Barnaby 
Kenneth F. Barr 
Frances Lea Beattie 
James Roy Bell 
Richard Wayne Bemis 
Judith Parmenter Bennett 
Paula Catherine Black 
John Mark Blanchette, Jr. 
William Purinton Bockoven 
Douglas Clifford Bowles 
Kathryn Bowry 

William Thomas Brewer, III 
Maria Anne Brigandi 
Donna Denison Briggs 
Richard Taylor Budden 
Janet Elizabeth Buerger 
Rebecca Anastasia Caras 
Susan Bayne Carey 
Daniel Reeves Carter 
Catherine Marie Casella 
Terrence A. Cassidy 
Susan Barbara Cavanaugh 
Celia Marie Cavicchio 
Paul Francis Cavicchio 
Pamela Louise Chase 
Richard Parker Chase 
Joanna Child 
Barbara Chipman 
George Hsien-Chung Chu 
Elizabeth Ann Clark 
Stephen Earle Clark 
Michael Moore Corcoran 
Amy Marine 11 Correll 
Linda Lee Corrigan 
Robin Sommer Culver 
Carolyn June Cutter 
Cynthia Lothrop Davis 
Karolyn Virginia D'Elia 
Barbara Jean Devoe 
Charles Edward Dietrich 
Patricia Jane Donnelly 
Leslie Ann Dowling 
Robert Leonard Doyon 



Georgine Frances Dugan 
George Thomas Enos 
Judith Susan Farrell 
Suzanne Jean Fedock 
Robert Kenneth Ferguson 
John Paul FitzPatrick 
Ronald J. Floridia 
Joan Patricia Floyd 
Joan Flynn 
Harold Walter Foley 
Robert Walker Forbes 
Joanna Susan Foster 
Stephen Ross Fowler 
James H. Fry, Jr. 
Jill Elaine Frye 
Carl Dennis Gainer 
Cynthia Pray Gallagher 
David Peter Garavano 
Christopher Lloyd Garrison 
Lynette Claire Gedrim 
Donald Franklin Gerson 
Richard B. Goddard, Jr. 
Pamela Dale Graham 
Stephen Joseph Grande 
Janice L. Guethlen 
Paul E. Haagensen 
Richard D. Hagerty 
Robert Richard Hamill 
Paul Thomas Hammar 
Janet Ellen Hankey 
Charles Robert Harris 
Beverly Marie Haskell 
Peter Long Hathaway 
Melvin Arnold Herlin, Jr. 
Laurence Degory Herthel 
Robert Walter Hickler 
Michael David Howe 
Alison Christine Hoyle 
Peter Harrison Hoyt 
Janet G. Huff 

Christopher M. Ireland, Jr 
Herbert Oscar James, Jr. 
Richard Lee Jenkins 
Craig A. Johnson 
Elizabeth Carter Johnson 
Marshal Eric Johnson 
David L. Jones 
Barr Alan Jozwicki 
Royce Carlton Kahler, Jr. 
James Francis Kelly, Jr. 
Christine Frances King 
John Richard Kirshner 
Claudia Lynne Lapsley 
Jane Ellen Lawson 
Harold George Lee 



246 



SCHOOLS 



Joanne Lehr 

Clarence Dewey Lester 

Anne-Marie L'Hermitte 

Karen Li ttlef ield 

Janet Marie Long 

Susan Fay Lukesh 

Veronica Anne Lyons 

Sandra Louise MacFarland 

Edward MacLeod, III 

Peter Barberie MacRae 

Lloyd R. Marshman 

Deborah Joy Martin 

Deborah Paulette Maxwell 

Leonard Joseph McCarthy, Jr. 

Kent Benson Medowski 

Jeanne Agnes Mercury 

Linda Louise Mertz 

Ralph Allen Mirse 

Robert David Moulton 

Kevin Steven Moynihan 

Francis Eaton Mundo 

Marian E. Myers 

Jeanne Priscilla Nesto 

Richard Leonard Neumeier 

Elizabeth L. Nolley 

Richard W. Nurczynski 

James J. Olivieri 

Joyce Verne Parsons 

Jean Carol Pirrello 

Richard A. Plank, Jr. 

Allan William Powers 

Albert John Putney 

Doris Jean Putney 

Laurence Field Radford 

Nancy Elizabeth Richmond 

Rosalind Mae Riordan 

John Ashby Rogers 

Joseph Hartwell Rogers 

Caroline Anne Ruocco 

Maria Jane Ruocco 

Francis A. Russell, III 



Sandra Eleanor St. Croix 

Jane Norma Sampson 

Linda Louise Saul 

Gail Sawyer 

Jacqueline Sawyer 

He id i Scholz 

Douglas Richard Schultze 

Constance Louise Schwartz 

Richard Eugene Scogland 

Donald Elliott Shay, Jr. 

Margaret Joy Shea 

Lawrence Michael Sherman 

Cheryl Ann Sicard 

Ma rgaret Wilcox Siegars 

Ma rtha Ellen Sjostedt 

Susan M. Smith 

Jane-Ann Spiller 

Carolyn Louise Stacey 

Charles Harold Stacy 

Channing W. Stone 

Merritt Adams Stone 

Elizabeth Jean Stover 

Jeanne Mar jorie Sullivan 

Martha Fuller Tarbell 

Elizabeth Anne Taylor 

Peter Lawrence Temple 

Elaine Mary Thompson 

Carol Ann Tonseth 

Ma ry Lee Tonseth 

Laurie Trees 

Marcia Victoria Troisi 

Kenneth Arnold Trussell 

Sandra Jean Vanaria 

William Michael Waldsmith.Jr 

David Rigler Walker 

Carl William M. Wallman 

John F. Wilfert 

Nancy Jane Wohlrab 

Elizabeth Worthington 

Joseph George Yered 



247 



SCHOOLS 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
Regional District Operating Expenses 



1964 1965 

Budget 



Funds Available 



Appropriation, salaries & expense $ 756 . 220 . 00 $ 833.268.00 

Expend itures 

Admin is tr at ion 

School Committee $ 980.99 $ 1,050.00 

Superintendent's Office 29,645.62 34,450.00 

Instruction 

Principals 39,509.50 40,781.00 

Teaching 429,898.46 491,190.00 

Textbooks 10,933.86 10,072.00 

Library service 13,036.37 15,552.00 

Audio visual -2,233.23 3,994.00 

Guidance services 35,644.88 38,184.00 

Other School Services 

Attendance 350.00 550.00 

Health services 4,469.18 5,759.00 

Pupil transportation 68,216.97 71,835.00 

Food service 3,570.00 3,767.00 

Student body activities 5,816.66 7,920.00 

Operation and Maintenance of Plant 

Operation of plant 71,506,89 74,140.00 

Maintenance of plant 15,854,27 13,865.00 

Fixed Charges 

Employees' retirement program 4,317.05 4,915.00 

Insurance program 8,425.91 12,284.00 

Programs with Other Systems 

Vocational tuition and transportation 2,466.81 2.960.00 

Total Expenditures $746, .876. 65 $833,268.00 

Voted from Federal Aid Accounts (20 .000.00 ) 

Net Total Expenditures $ 746.876.65 $ 813. 268.00 

Appor t ionments 

Total Budget $756,220.00 $813,268.00 
Less: Available funds in District 

Treasury 100.472.97 85 . 828.05 

Balance to be apportioned $655,747.03 $727,439.95 

Lincoln apportionment $167,358.84 $192,566.68 

Sudbury apportionment $488,388,19 $534,873.27 



248 



SCHOOLS 



LINCOLN -SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



School Organization and Staff 
January 1 , 1965 



School Committee 



Howard W. Emmons, Chairman 
James M. Jagger , Vice-Chairman 
Joseph E. Brown 
Ellen DeN. Cannon 
Virginia K. Kirshner 
Henry M. Morgan 



Term expires 1967 

Term expires 1965 

Term expires 1965 

Term expires 1966 

Term expires 1966 

Term expires 1967 



Superintendent of Schools 



C. Newton Heath 

Business Manager and Secretary to School Committee 



Office: 420 Lincoln Road, 
Sudbur y 



443-9961 
259-9527 



Lily T. Spooner 



George B. Flint 



Leslie M. Tourville 
Roger T. Thurston 
Paul J, Vernon 
Betty J. Adrian 
Robert J. Andrews 
Bramwell B. Arnold 
Barbara M. Athy 
Ouida L. Bailey 
Lewis K. Baldwin 
Katherine D. Barton 
John B. Bowdoin 
Lucille C. Brady 
Barbara S. Brannen 
Derek F. Brown 
Eleanor M. Burgess 
Kenneth N. Burt 
Ruth M. Buxton 
Peggy S. Cohen 
Miriam S. Coombs 
Vicki A. Edelman 
Marion F. Edwards 
Marjorie J, Flanagan 
William B. Galvin 
Sherry M. Glass 
Mark G. Gulesian 



District Treasurer 



Teaching Personnel 



443-9961 



259-8611 



Appointed 



1956 
1956 
1958 
1961 
1964 
1956 
1964 
1964 
1961 
1956 
1958 
1964 
1964 
1963 
1963 
1964 
1956 
1964 
1956 
1963 
1956 
1962 
1959 
1962 
1961 



Principal 

Assistant-Principal 

Director of Gu i d a n c e 

English - Counselor 

Art - Mechanical Drawing 

Phys ics 

Physical Education 

Biology 

Physical Education 

Home Economics 

History 

Spanish 

Home Economics 

Counselor 

Mathemat ics 

Physical Education 

Latin 

French 

Engl ish 

Physical Education 

Biology 

Mathemat ics 

Ma thematics 

History 

Engl ish 



249 



SCHOOLS 



Appointed 



Frank Heys, Jr. 

Mary S. Jemail 

Richard W. Jeter 

Richard J. Johnson 

Am y A . Kass 

Joseph D. Krol 

Edward F. Leary 

Elmer F. Leonard 

Deborah N. Lewis 

Philip G. Lewis 

John A. Mace in i 

Richard E. Markham 

Alexander G. Marshall, Jr 

Raymond S. Martin 

Marisa G. McCoy 

Robert E. Millett 

Paul B. Mitchell 

Albert S. Palmer 

Martha R. Pappas 

Carl G. Perkins 

Frances M. Perron 

Laura S. Pollock 

Thomas J. Puchalsky 

H. Patricia Punchard 

George F. Ronan 

Bradford H. Sargent 

Frederic A. Scott 

David J. Spang 

Sherman P. Spaulding 

Norman R. Swicker 

Albert A. Trot tier 

Irene R. Tutuny 

Paul J. Walsh 
Robert G. Wentworth 
Lynn Werner 
Susan Wheatley 
Henry C. Zabierek 



1957 


Engl ish 


1964 


Engl ish 


1963 


Engl ish 


1958 


Bus iness 


1964 


History 


1961 


German 


1960 


Art - Counselor 


1964 


Mathemat ics 


1962 


French 


1962 


Mathemat ics 


1958 


Earth Science - Counselor 


1964 


His tor y 


1956 


Mathematics 


1960 


Chemistry 


1963 


English 


1960 


Biology 


1957 


History 


1964 


Mathemat ics 


1961 


Engl ish 


1960 


Read ing 


1960 


Bus ine ss 


1957 


Counselor 


1964 


Engl ish 


1964 


English 


1962 


Driver Education 


1962 


History - Government 


1961 


Chemistry - Physics 


1962 


Earth Science 


1963 


Mathemat ics 


1961 


Industrial Ar t s 


1964 


French - Spanish 


1956 


Business Education - 




Counsel or 


1958 


Industrial Arts 


1960 


Mus ic 


1964 


English - Speech 


1963 


Libr ar ian 


1958 


History 



Health Personnel 



Gordon D. Winchell, M.D., School Physician 
Lois M. Natoli, R. N. , School Nurse 
Mary E. O'Connor, School Nurse 



259-8618 
443-2545 
443-2545 



School Secretaries 



Regional High School 
Hope Baldwin 
Ellen D. Berg 
Dor is M, C ook 



Garcia Kimball 
Virginia A, Maenpas 
Gertrude I. Patterson 



Superintendent's Office 
Ruth T. Cathcart 



250 



SCHOOLS 

Custodians and Maintenance 

William L. Long, Supervisor George Fales 

Donald Burgess William F. McNeil 

James M. Horan, Jr. Frances B. Long, Matron 

Ellsworth Oulton Eleanor E. Macdonald, 
Oliver Wainio Matron 

Cafeteria Personnel 

Isabel L. Taylor, Manager Josephine R. Mastrototaro 

Anna E. Boyd Dorothy M. Taffe 

Mildred A. Fales John E. Valentine 

Mary C, Grover Rose C. Wright 

Bus Contractors 

Myer Goodwin 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Wellesley Motor Coach Company 



NO-SCHOOL SIGNAL 

In the event of exceptionally severe weather conditions 
or when the transportation system is disrupted, WBZ , WCOP, 
WEEI, WHDH, WKOX, WNAC, and WSRO will broadcast the no-school 
announcement between 7:00 and 8:00 a. m. 

Since weather reports are not always reliable, and since 
the School District desires to render maximum educational ser 
vice, the schools will remain open except in very severe 
weather . 



251 



SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1965-1966 

Staff Workshop September 1-3, 7, 1965 

Labor Day September 6 

Freshman Orientation Day September 8 

School Opens September 9 

Columbus Day October 12 

Veterans* Day November 11 

Thanksgiving Recess November 25, 26 
(one half day on November 24) 

Christmas Vacation December 23-31, inclusive 
(one half day on December 22) 

Winter Vacation February 21-25, inclusive 

Spring Recess April 18, 19 

Memorial Day May 30 

School Closes June 22 

Staff Post-School Workshop June 23-30 



252 



SCHOOLS 

LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Membership by Age and Grade 
October 1, 1964 



BOYS 

Age 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ Totals 

Grade 

9 29 97 15 141 

10 18 78 10 3 1 110 

11 27 72 12 1 1 113 

12 26 71 8 3 108 
PG 3 3_ 

Total 29 115 120 108 86 12 4 1 475 

GIRLS 

Age 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ Totals 



29 88 3 1 121 

29 88 5 122 

25 95 4 124 

23 80 5 111 111 



Total 29 117 116 124 84 5 111 478 

Grand Total 953 

TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING OTHER SCHOOLS 
October 1, 1964 

Framingham Vocational High School 2 

Newton Technical High School 1 

Waltham Vocational High School 1_ 

Total Other Schools 4 

a|c j|c ^c ^e j|e :|c 

Distribution of Students Between Lincoln and Sudbury 

Lincoln Sudbury Tuition Totals 

Regional High 263 688 2 953 

Vocational 4 4 

Total 263 692 2 957 

253 



Grad 
9 


e 


10 




11 




12 




PG 





VITAL STATISTICS 



Sixty-three births, twenty-nine marriages, and twenty- 
five deaths have been recorded during the year 1965, as fol- 
lows : 

BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



1959 



July 



6 Heidi Anne Myles 



Theresa & J. Richard Myles 



1963 



June 


17 


Nov . 


10 


1964 


Jan . 


2 


Jan . 


4 


Jan . 


11 


Jan . 


11 


Jan . 


14 


Jan . 


27 


Jan . 


29 


Jan . 


30 


Feb. 


11 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


27 


Feb. 


29 


March 


8 


March 


11 


March 


12 


March 


15 


March 


16 


March 


17 


March 


19 


April 


1 


April 


20 


April 


28 


May 


14 


May 


18 


May 


23 


May 


31 


June 


10 


June 


12 


June 


24 


June 


25 


June 


25 


June 


30 



Claire Ellen Louise 
O'Shea 
10 Sara Guthrie Grim 



Elizabeth Tarky 
Charles Louis Poulos, Jr. 
James Moore Yos 
Richard August Gallun, Jr 
Ruel Davenport Little 
Jonathan Gregory Keevil 
Adam Moore Rugo 
Juliette Lorraine Wang 
Diane Barbara Barker 
Kelly Mae Davidson 
Kelly Marie Troisi 
Scott Huntley Flanigan 
Rebecca Elaine Tingey 
Susan Marie Boyer 
Timothy Paul Algeo 
Barbara Jean Maling 
Heather Kathleen Dickey 
Caroline Sidney Lockwood 
Kurt Albin Douty 
Bane Christian Beshears 
Susan Frances Cutler 
Thomas Weston Hankey 
Phyllis Ann Elliott 
Christine Theresa Cook 
Kimberly Ann Malloy 
Melissa Anne Summers 
Lucia Dina Rossoni 
Sharon Mahoney 
Elise Virginia Lemire 
Kathlene Susan Patria 
Eric Stark Willmann 
Heidi Margaret Willmann 
Mara K. Felegian 



Claire M. & Bernard G. 

O'Shea 
Barbara & William Grim, Jr. 



Pauline L. &, Vincent Tarky 
Sophie J. & Charles Poulos 
Ann L. & Jerrold M. Yos 

Katherine &, Richard Gallun 
Elizabeth D. & John Little 
Hannah M. & Charles Keevil 
Faith W. & Henry J. Rugo 
Lorraine C. &, An Wang 
Barbara E. & William Barker 
Cynthia & Robert Davidson 
Mary G. & Ferdinand Troisi 
Constance & Charles Flanigan 
Ruth V. & William Tingey, Jr. 
Elaine T. & Louis L. Boyer 
Elaine T. & Leo J. Algeo 
Norah J. & George Maling 
Emy P. & Dana H. Dickey 
Irene P. & Dunbar Lockwood 
Svea V. & Lloyd A. Douty 
Revel W. & John Beshears 
Judith A. & Theodore Cutler 
Edna J. & Francis W. Hankey 
Ethel M. & Robert H. Elliott 
Kathleen G. & Harry Cook 
Carol S.. & Robert Malloy, Jr. 
Winifred & Richard Summers 
Paola M. &, John Rossoni 
Anne M. &, George Mahoney 
Virginia &, Robert Lemire 
Karen A. & Louis Patria, Jr , 
Margaret & Werner Willmann 
Margaret & Werner Willmann 
Marion 0. &, Peter Felegian 



254 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



July 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept , 

Sept , 

Sept , 

Oct. 

Oct . 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov . 

Nov . 

Nov . 

Nov . 

Nov . 

Dec . 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



8 

13 

29 

1 

1 

3 

8 

8 

19 

21 

31 

8 

19 

28 

14 

15 

17 

19 

1 

4 

10 

18 

29 

8 

20 

26 

31 



Peter Joseph Linstrom 
Thomas Nathaniel Wood 
David Sherwin Hill 
Peter Phillips Taschioglou 
William Grover Brown 
Kristine Barrett Hoyt 
Mary Prise ilia Stevens 
Nina Sophia Braude 
Karen Tamar Haessler 
Frank Eleazer Squibb 
Adam Way Stubbins 
William Osier McLean 
Timothy Neal Teabo 
Elizabeth Anne Tracey 
Rebecca Marie Ashe 
Anne Tinsley Herrick 
Stuart Anderson Dwyer 
James Harrington Hall 
Tracy Helen Terrell 
John Michael Carew, Jr. 
Matthew Dearborn Rand 
Peter Anthony Dwyer 
Karl Howard Kornfeld 
Rosemary O'Brien 
Christine Gerard Doyle 
Stephen Emerson Woodward 
Jocelyn Grace Webster 



Maybelle &. Peter Linstrom 
Nancy S. & George Wood, Jr. 
Helen S. & Jacques Hill 
Rhoda & Kemon Taschioglou 
Lee G. &, Robert W. Brown 
Shirley E. &, Harrison Hoyt 
Ellen R. & Samuel Stevens 
Bettie L. &, Stephen Braude 
Diane F. &, Herbert Haessler 
Mildred & Eleazer Squibb 
Gretchen & Hugh Stubbins, III 
Ann G. &, John L. McLean 
Elizabeth F. & Prince Teabo 
Caroline J. &. Robert Tracey 
Mary F. & Hilary Ashe 
Maureen & Arthur Herrick, Jr. 
Marilyn & Warren R. Dwyer 
Barbara J. &, Henry P. Hall 
Mary H. & John Terrell 
Alice M. & John M. Carew 
Priscilla & William Rand , Jr . 
Carol M. & James Dwyer 
Hulen & George R. Kornfeld 
Barbara &. John H. O'Brien 
Evelyn M. & Albert Doyle 
Eva U. & Jasper Woodward 
Winifred W. & David Webster 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Mar r iage 

1964 



Names 



Feb. 1 Salvatore Caruso 
Judith A. Rego 

Feb. 2 Joseph J. Bisson, Jr. 
Josephine Willemin 

Feb. 20 Stephen J. Grande 
Elaine H. Kelly 

March 7 Michael Wortis 
Ruth Emerson 

April 3 Rodney J. Johnson 

Anne Codman Sturgis 

April 18 Ernest Fiorelli 
Jo Ann Sessoms 



Residence 



Somerville, Ma s s . 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Framingham, Mass. 

Berkeley, California 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Salem, Oregon 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Waltham, Mass. 



255 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Date of 
Ma r r i a g e 



Name s 



Re s idence 



April 25 Warren E. Meade 
Mary E. Deane 

May 16 David B. Shibles 
Linda Ruth Woods 

May 31 Robert H. Bradford 
Judith R. Sadler 

June 6 William H. Morse, Jr. 
Joyce C. Boyden 

June 13 M. Gerald Quinn, Jr. 
Sheila Maclaurin 



June 20 

June 27 

July 1 

July 6 

July 10 

July 22 

July 24 

August 1 

August 8 

Au gust 8 

August 16 

Sept. 4 

Sept. 5 



Jan R. Schueler 
Mary C. Rogers 

Arthur E. Norton 
Shelley H. Swift 

Raymond E. Burke 
Alice E. Marshall 

Leland A. Gardner, Jr. 
Margaret D. Gottschalk 

David J. Campbell 
Louise B. Healey 

Peter Schofield 
Judith Rodimon 

Richard A. Bomengen 
Judith E. Johnson 

Steven W. Ziegler 
Cynthia C. Smith 

John W. Archabal 
Nina M. Marchetti 

Frank A. Tupper , III 
Judith Preston 

Bernard J. Eitapence 
Frances Cibel 

Ernest H. Osgood, Jr. 
Cornelia W, C. Smith 

William H. Barry 
Ann Endicott Monks 



Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Watertown, Mass. 

Brewer , Maine 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Walpole, Mass. 

Irving, New York 
Westwood, Mass. 

New York, New York 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Belmont , Ma s s . 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Beverly Farms, Mass 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Canton, New York 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Wayland, Mass. 

Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Westhampton, L. I. 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Rutland, Vermont 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln , Mass . 
Sudbury , Mas s . 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Lincoln, Mass. 



256 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Date of 
Mar r iage 

Sept . 5 

Sept. 6 

Sept. 15 

Sept. 19 

Sept. 26 



Names 



Res idence 



Francis J. Dalli 
Mary E. C. Denese 

Christopher H. Venier 
Kathleen G. Etz 

Courtenay Crocker, Jr 
Helen C. Everett 

Bruce S. Fowle 
Marcia R. Taylor 

Richard F. Hanson 
Sandra M. MacLeod 



Lincoln, Ma s s . 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 

Lincoln , Mass . 
Bedford , Mass . 

Marblehead , Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Alandome, New York 
Lincoln , Mas s . 

Concord , Mass . 
Lincoln, Ma s s . 



DEATHS 



Date of 
Death 



1963 



July 



1964 



15 



Jan . 


11 


Feb. 


22 


March 


13 


April 


2 


April 


3 


April 


8 


April 


15 


May 


1 


May 


8 


May 


17 


June 


5 


June 


27 


July 


13 


July 


18 


Aug. 


15 


Aug. 


30 


Aug. 


31 


Sept . 


29 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


24 


Nov . 


15 


Nov . 


22 


Dec. 


28 



Na 



me 



Lillian H. Hunter 



Robert D. Donaldson, Sr . 

Harold T. Canavan 

Thalia (Smith) Bolton 

May L. Jacobs 

Arthur C. Dodge 

Joseph J. Manning 

Anna Shaheen 

Edith B. Long 

Alice M. (Coburn) Teabo 

Mary H. (Landry) Clark 

Grace (Dorr) Pierce 

Emerson G. Gaylord 

Baby Boy Wood 

Virginia (Everett) Evans 

Sarah W. Kane 

John Adams 

Winifred (Flaherty) Lyons 

Norman W. Fradd 

Joseph R. Tracey 

Ida (Walker) Henley 

William Montgomery S. Wilson 

Charles Poulos, Jr. 

Rachel Washburn 



81 



Afte 



Years Months Days 



13 



93 


2 


20 


67 


8 


4 


68 


2 





82 


7 


29 


75 


11 


6 


65 


- 


- 


69 


11 


16 


19 


- 


- 


77 


7 


9 


81 


3 


29 


96 


9 


19 


56 


5 


28 




1 Hr. - 


3 6 Min 


47 


2 


27 


92 


11 


3 


89 


1 


13 


75 








75 


2 


28 


63 


3 


2 


77 


1 


17 


55 


2 


25 


- 


10 


18 


88 


8 


21 



257 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Es t at e 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Adler , 
Adler , 
Algeo , 
Algeo , 



Abbott, John A. & Diana B. $ 

Adams, John Quincy 

Adams, John Quincy & Lucy D. 

Adams, Ramelle C. 

Adams, Thomas B. 

Adamson, William M. & Barbara M. 

Adkins, Archibald W. & Dorothea 

Adler , Harold 

Ivy Ruth 

Walter, Jr. & Geraldine A. 
John T. & Catherine R. 
Leo J. & Elaine T. 
Algeo, Margaret M. &, Neville, 

Agnes M. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 
Allen, Robert L. & Carol E. 
Allison, William S. & Caroline P. 
Ammen, David L. & Judith B. 
Anderson, Carl L. & Dorothy A. 
Anderson, Lawrence B. & Rosina 
Andrews, Francis S. & Dorothy W. 
Andrews, Paul R. & Catherine L. 
Angell , Craig W. & Carolyn G. 
Angelo, Gaspar & Eda Polcari 
Aptekar , Herbert H. & Florence T. 
Aptt, Harry S. & Etta E. 
Armstrong, Virginia 
Armstrong, William A., Jr. & 

Mary H. 
Aschenbr enner , Bert C. & Ann E. 
Ashworth, Harold T. & Irma D. 
Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. & Barbara 
Austin, Richard C. & Marcia W. 
Avery, Abigail D. 

Badger, Sherwin C., Jr. &, 

Mary Elizabeth 
Baggs , Arthur, Jr. & Marion S. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Bailey, Richard B. &, Rebecca B. 
Ba ir d-Atomic , Inc. 
Baker, John C. & Elizabeth E. 
Baldwin, Herbert L. & Beatrice A. 
Baldwin, Robert H. & Stirapson', 

Edward S., Ill (Lincoln 

Assoc iates ) 
Baldwin, William H. & Agnes D; 
Ballou, Clyde D. & Mildred A. S. 
Balser, Martin & Arienne S. 
Baltrush, William C. & Sarah M. 



$ 12, 570 



300 



150 



15,100 



70 



52 
25 

12 
15 
28 



6 
17 
16 

9 
19 
21 

3 
18 
26 
11 

6 
13 

16 
19 
10 
19 
10 
12 



16 
11 

22 

1 

3 

17 



47 

7 

12 

4 



900 
040 

370 
380 
950 
150 
370 
250 
170 

200 

080 
410 
570 
830 
570 
900 
750 
000 
550 
550 
000 
800 

800 
120 
880 
650 
800 
900 



720 
320 
300 
800 
200 
750 
250 



180 
750 
120 
000 
950 



$ 967 

23 

4 ,073 

1 ,928 

11 

952 

1 , 184 

2 , 229 

11 
721 
635 
398 



55 
1 ,16 

46 
1 , 34 
1 , 27 

75 
1 , 50 
1 , 68 

28 

1 , 38 

2 ,04 

88 

46 

1 ,06 



1 ,293 

1 ,472 

837 

1 , 5 1"3 

831 

993 



1 , 287 

871 

28 

1 , 755 

92 

288 



89 
10 
30 
08 
55 
49 
26 
15 
55 
49 
25 
09 

40 
70 
16 
57 
89 
91 
89 
30 
75 
00 
35 
35 
00 
60 

60 
24 
76 
05 
60 
30 



44 
64 
49 
60 
40 
75 



1 , 328. 25 



3 , 632.86 

57.75 

548.24 

924.00 

381.15 



258 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Shirley G. 

& Mary F. 

& Mary H. 



Bannan, William J., Jr. & $ 
Quigg, Charles L., Jr., Tr s . 
Lincolnsf ield Realty Trust 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Barber, John W., Jr. & Mary E. 

Barbera, Anthony A. &, Eleanor E. 

Bardsley, Theodore J. & Doris A. 

Barker, William R. & Barbara S. 

Barnaby, John M. &, Charlotte B. 

Barnard, Helen Ogden 

Barnecut, Leo J., Jr. &, Alysse M. 

Barr, Edgar E. &, Olive H. 

Barrett, Emerson P. & Margaret K. 

Barthel, Walter 

Barthel, Walter & Emma C. 

Bartlett, Nancy W. 

Bastress, E. Karl & Anne W. 

Beal , Thomas P., Jr. & Barbara B. 

Beaton, Daniel R. & 

Belanger, Walter E. 

Beldock, George J. 

Bellizia, Francis E 

Bennett, Richard K. & Doris S. 

Benton, Carl R. & Barbara A. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. 

Ber nson , Bob 

Bernson, Bob & Edith J. 

Bertolami, Leo 

Billings, Bruce H. & Sarah W. 

Bingham, Elizabeth A. 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B. 

Bingham, George C. 

Bisbee, Marie E. 

Bishop , Fern W. 

Black, Everett A. & Anne E. 

Blais, George A. & Annette C. 

Blakeley, Gerald W., Jr. 

Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 

Bockoven, John S. 

Bockoven, John Sanbourne & 
Dorothy Ruth 

Boersner, Wolfram A. & Doris M. 
Bogner, Walter F. & Edith 
Boisvert, Henry A. & Blanche T. 
Bolt, Richard H. & Katherine L. 
Bolton, Stanwood K. & Thalia H. 
Bomengen, Allen & Ethel A. 
Bonaceto, Anthony & Grace 
Bonia, Walter J. 
Booth, Alice Burrage 



$ 



$ 



70 



150 



3 


, 820 




294. 


4 


, 500 




346 . 


7 


, 200 




554. 


15 


, 000 


1 


,155. 


4 


, 600 




354. 


7 


, 800 




600 . 


9 


, 600 




739 . 


11 


, 780 




907. 


19 


, 880 


1 


, 530 . 


10 


, 500 




808. 


12 


750 




981 . 




100 




7 . 


8 


,180 




629 . 


13 


800 


1 


, 062. 


21 


000 


1 


,617. 


17 


550 


1 


, 351 . 


10 


800 




831 . 


11 


550 




889 . 


6 


520 




502. 


9 


300 




716 . 


7 


200 




554 . 




150 




11 . 


24 


600 


1 


, 899 . 


2 


770 




213. 




450 




34. 


9 


000 




693. 


1 


500 




115 . 


14 


850 


1 


, 143. 


1 


800 




138 . 




380 




29 . 


7 , 


800 




600 . 


7 , 


050 




542. 


44, 


850 


3 


,453. 


8 


620 




663. 


51 


150 


3 


,938. 




450 




34. 
11 . 


7, 


720 




594. 


2, 


480 




190. 


14, 


800 


1 


,139. 


7, 


200 




554. 


18, 


150 


1 


, 397. 


12, 


300 




947. 


8, 


620 




663. 


9, 


070 




698 . 


10, 


500 




808. 




900 




69. 



259 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Es tat e 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Estate of 
, &, Dor een W . 
& Alice M. 



Booth, Robert H. $ 

Boston Consolidated Gas 

Boston Edison Company 

Boston & Ma ine Railroad 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, William, 

Bowman, Edward F 

Boyce , Manley B. 

Boyce, Mary M. 

Boy er , Ed war d 

Boyer, Edward &, An g e 1 a V . 

Boyer, Louis L. &, Elaine T. 

Bradford, Robert L. & Martha A. 

Bradley, Clifford & Jeanette E. 

Bradley, Junia T. 

Brannen, Robert C. & Barbara A. 

Braude, Stephen E. &, Bettie J. 

Braun, Morton B. &, Esther K. 

Brennan, William L. &, Eleanor A. 

Brewster, Ellen Beebe 

Briggs, Susan L. 

Brisson, Norman F. & Evelyn W. 

Bronson, Franklin C. & Catherine 

Brooks , Paul 

Brown, Deborah Trull, David 

Trull, Alan Trull 
Brown, Elizabeth G. 
Brown, Joan Nickerson 
Brown, John B. & Ann P. 
Brown, Robert W. & Lee G. 
Browne, Secor D. &, Mary D. 
Brownell, Robert G. & Ruth M. 
Browning, Edgar C. & Katherine 
Browning, George U. 
Brown's Wood, Inc. 
Buerger, Maria 
Buerger, Martin J. & Lila 
Builders Club of Lincoln, Inc. 
Bulkley, Joel B. &, Doris L. 
Burckett, Douglas M. 
Burckett, Douglas M. & Phillippa 
Burgess, William A. 
Burk, George W. & Ruth M. 
Burke, James E. &, Margaret M. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burns , Melvin P. 

Burroughs, Eugene L. &, June M. 
Burt, William F. & Donna G. 
Burton, William d eK . & Priscilla 
Butcher, Alfred G. & Helen M. 



$ 



22 .960 



244, 000 
513, 440 



150 



40 



40 



10 
6 
8 

18 
9 

18 

11 
9 
8 
4 

14 
4 

14 

15 



2 
10 
10 
17 



23 
8 
7 
3 
11 
22 
4 
7 
1 

15 
19 
15 

12 

2 

8 

20 

20 

6 

17 

10 

16 

6 



900 
900 
580 
830 
620 
170 
830 
750 
620 
000 
550 
810 
320 
280 
700 
070 
370 
8 
400 
050 
600 
020 

10 
230 
630 
650 
670 
250 
650 
650 
050 
720 

900 
580 
900 

370 
260 
700 
920 
120 
150 
500 
900 
130 
970 



$1 , 7 
18 , 7 
39 , 8 

8 
5 
6 

1,3 
7 

1,4 
8 
6 
6 
3 

1,1 



1,1 

1,1 

7 



1 

7 

8 

1,3 



67 
88 
35 
69 
14 
25 
63 
99 
56 
43 
94 
93 
58 
70 
02 
29 
31 
60 
21 
6 
84 
73 
16 
10 



1 , 788 
664 
589 
282 
866 

I7744 

358 

542 

132 

3 

1 , 224 

1 .507 



224 



3 
952 
174 
669 

1 ,610 

1 ,549 
473 

1 , 347 
839 

1 , 242 
536 



260 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY l, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Es tat e 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Butcher, Henry A., Jr. & $ 

Margaret V. 
Butler, Hector &. Audrey Edith 
Butler, William B. & Mary Jane 
Butler, William H. & Nancy G. 
Butts, Louise M. 

Calkins, Charles W. &, Thelma E. 
Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. 
Calkins, Charles W. , Jr. & 

Martha A. 
Calkins, Ramona T. 
Callahan, Thomas R. 
Campobasso, Anthony B. & 

Dorothy M. 
Campobasso, Joseph R. 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. &, Bradford 
Caras, Byron &, Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair & Florence L. 
Carew, John M. & Alice M. 
Carley, John A. &, Joan Keir 
Carney, James J. & Agnes M. 
Carney, Florence T. 
Carstensen, Warren &. Evelyn G. 
Caskey, Walter H. & Anna H. 
Cassidy, Henry J. &, Verna E. 
Cassidy, Robert E. &, Isabelle 
Cassis, Anthony 
Caswell, John R. & Carol B. 
Cate, Philip T. , Jr. & Marjorie 
Causer, William 0. &, Mary E. 
Chadwick, William & Jessie T. 
Champeny, John C. &, Leona G. 
Chapin, Louise B. & Bertha L. 
Chapin, Margaret E. 
Chapman, James S. & Emily M. 
Chellis, Herbert N. & Eleanor M. 
Chiotelis, Charles L. &, Iasme J. 
Chipman, Robert H. &, Mary F. 
Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret F. 
Chittick, Mary Gertrude & 

Suesens, Eleanor G. 
Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 
Church, Robert T. & Priscilla S. 
Ciampi, Emilio & Mary P. 
Cibel, Stanley A. 
Cibel, Stanley A. & Thelma W. 
C i r a s o , Am e 1 i a 
Clare , Mary E . 
Clark, Clifford A. & Patricia D. 



$ 



$ 



1 , 500 



3 , 300 

6 , 600 

9 , 520 

10 ,570 

21 , 220 

8 , 850 



70 



16 

4 

13 

5 

3 

46 

12 

9 

6 

14 

7 

5 

27 

11 

6 

7 

11 

9 

17 

5 

9 

12 

17 

5 

6 

7 

8 

7 

7 

11 
10 
17 
10 

10 
5 

10 
9 



720 
050 
350 

170 
150 
580 
450 
370 
750 
700 
800 
260 
530 
340 
760 
500 
550 
900 
150 
180 
060 
600 
180 
330 
900 
880 
250 
800 
720 

550 
050 
480 
870 

950 
920 
580 
600 



254 
508 
733 
813 
1 , 633 

681 

115 

1 , 287 

311 

1 ,027 

398 
242 
3 , 586 
958 
721 
519 

1 ,131 

600 
405 

2 , 119 

873 
520 
577 
889 
762 

1 , 320 
398 
697 
970 

1 , 322 
410 
531 
606 
635 
600 
594 

889 
773 
1 , 345 
836 
5 
843 
455 
814 
739 



10 
20 
04 
89 
94 

45 
50 

44 
85 
95 

09 
55 
66 
65 
49 
75 
90 
60 
02 
81 
18 
52 
50 
35 
30 
55 
86 
62 
20 
86 
41 
30 
76 
25 
60 
44 

35 
85 
96 
99 
39 
15 
84 
66 
20 



261 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Es tat e 



Clark, Richard C. B. & 

Josephine F. 
Clark, Vern & Velma M. 
Clark, William T. &, Catharine T. 
Coan, Thomas & Catherine M. 
Coane, John H. , Jr. 
Coburn, Edward S. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. M. 
Codman, Dorothy S. F. M. , Tyler, 

Roger B. & Fawcett, Benjamin, 

Trus tees 
Coffey, John B. & Wilma L. 
Cole, Edwin M. &, Lucy F. 
Com jean, Marc G. & Judith K. 
Comstock, Joan B. 
Comstock, Joan M. 
Conant, Lily R. 

Condit, Robert P. & Phyllis C. 
Conley, Barclay 

Conlin, James J. &, Winifred I. 
Connair, John J. &, Ferro, 

Jacqueline 
Connolly, Donald W. &, Joyce Y. 
Connolly, J. Irving & Evelyn 
Connolly, John Irving, Jr. 
Connors, Thomas H. &, Alice P. 
Conrad, Walter C. & Margaret M. 
Conroy, John L. & Grace W. 
Constantine, Philip J. 
Cook , Cel ia M. 
Cook , Harry 

Cook, Harry &, Kathleen G. 
Cook, John F. & Ethel A. 
Cook, Paul &. Jacqueline H. 
Cook, Paul W. , Jr. & Marian M. 
Coolidge, Henry P. &, Alice C. 
Coons, Richard D. & Nancy J. 
Cope, Oliver & Alice DeN. 



$ 



$ 



$ 



300 



Cope, Thomas Pym & 
Cormack, Allan M. 
Corr igan , An n a G . , 



Elizabeth W. 
Admx . 



Corr igan , 
Corr igan , 
Corr igan , 
C os tell o , 
Costello , 



Leo W. 
Mary 
Mary K. 
John D. 
William H. 



& Ellen E. 
Lucy M. A. 



Cotoia, Anthony J. & 
Cotoni, Carolana M. 
Coughlin, Francis B. &, Mary T. 
Courtney, Joseph Donald 



70 



600 



7 ,050 

8 , 250 
18 , 750 

5 , 320 

4, 510 

8 , 250 

10 , 350 



66 

7 

17 

14 

11 

7 

16 

7 



6 
6 
3 

2 

1 

7 

10 

13 

11 

3 

9 

13 

12 

26 

13 

11 

1 

6 

4 

11 

2 

3 

10 
7 
2 
5 



230 
800 
250 
320 
420 
870 
480 
730 

830 

380 
980 
450 
380 
470 
350 
570 
640 
570 

700 
900 
370 
650 
220 
550 
500 
100 
500 
000 
950 
400 
400 
450 
000 
050 
050 
550 
020 



542 
635 
443 
409 
347 
658 
796 



5 ,099 

600 

1 . 328 



102 



85 
25 
75 
64 
27 
35 
95 



71 
60 
25 
64 
34 
99 
96 



879 

605 

1 , 268 

595.21 

5.39 

525.91 



491 
537 
265 
29 
190 
103 
582 
819 
044 



26 
46 
65 
26 
19 
95 
89 
28 
89 



46.20 
900.90 



300 

721 

1 ,051 

940 

2,044 

1 ,039 



30 
49 
05 
94 
35 
50 
854.70 



115 
462 
381 
877 
184 
34 
231 
773 
542 
196 
386 



50 
00 
15 
80 
80 
65 
00 
85 
85 
35 
54 



262 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Es t at e 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Cousins, Ashley B. $ 

Cousins, Bessie M. 

Cousins, Estate of Lawrence B. 

& Jeanne B. 
Cowen, Rodney P. &, Eleinor 
Cowles, Addison & Alexandra C. 
Crandall, Stephen H. &, Patricia 
Crawford, John D. 
Crawford, John D. &, Joanna W. 
Creonte, Anthony J., Trustee 
Crook, Constance S. 
Crowson, Leslie W. & Madeline W. 
Culver, Perry J. 
Culver, Perry J. &, Kate S. 
Cummings, William R. & Palma M. 
Cunningham, J. Lewis &. Ruth P. 
Cunningham, Robert Allen &. 

Mar gar et 
Cunningham, Robert M. 
Curran, Robert J. 
Cutcliffe, John L. &, Elaine E. 

Dadmun, Harrie H. &, Helen 

Dahl , Thyr a 

Dalrymple, Chester & Jean 

Dalrymple, Sidney C. &, Dorothy C. 

Damico, Louise 

Daniels, Bruce G. & Janet B. 

Danosky, Edward A. 

Danosky, Edward A. & Mary C. 

Danosky, Stefania 

D*Arrigo Brothers Co. of Mass. 

d 'Autremont, Chester C. & Ruth W. 

David Buttrick Company 

Davidson, Robert W. & Cynthia A. 

Davis, Alfred M. 

Davis, D. Bradford & Barbara G. 

Davis, John R. & Jacqueline C. 

Davis, Prescott L. 

Davis, Ronald C. & Barbara C. 

Davis, Saville R. & Anita V. 

Davis, Sherman P. & Phyllis M. 

Davis , William H. 

Davison, Alice P. 

Dawes, Donald L. & Ruth K. 

Day, Mildred 

Dean , Emma W. 

Dean, William M. 

Dean, William M. & Lorraine C. 

DeCilio, Frank W. & Josephine R. 



$ 



3 , 520 
7,130 



80 



150 



1 , 500 



12 

7 

9 

16 

8 

5 
10 

27 
10 

7 

13 

10 

8 

2 

18 
8 

24 

19 
8 

20 
2 
8 

14 
4 

30 

22 
4 
7 

15 
7 

17 
9 

13 
6 
7 

22 
6 
2 
4 
2 
6 
9 



080 
580 
070 
120 

920 
300 
250 
120 

600 
210 
130 

800 
420 
020 
400 

750 
400 
520 
120 
930 
850 
620 
480 
850 
870 
670 
200 
950 
130 
600 
800 
850 
370 
880 
300 
130 
050 
530 
630 
810 
620 
150 
750 



$ 271 
549 

930 
583 
698 

1 , 241 

6 
686 

23 
404 
779 

11 

2 , 125 

786 
549 

1 ,062 
802 
617 
184 

1 , 443 
646 

1 , 888 

1 , 472 
687 

1 , 605 
201 
652 

1 , 258 

374 

2 , 361 
1 , 709 

381 
549 

1 , 201 
600 

1 , 374 
721 

1 ,068 
485 
549 

1 , 697 
502 
202 
370 
201 
473 
750 



263 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
E s t at e 





Tax on 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 


1 


istate 




508, 


, 20 




865, 


,48 




750, 


.75 


2 


,564, 


,10 


1 


, 328 


, 25 




993 


. 30 




455 


.84 


1 


,044 


,89 


2 


, 367 


.75 


3 


, 263 


.26 




906 


.29 


2 


, 858 


.24 




433 


.51 


1 


, 600 


.06 


2 


,032 


.03 


1 


,992 


.76 




508 


.20 




696 


.08 




797 


.72 


1 


,559 


.25 




306, 


.46 




57 


.75 




554, 


.40 




635, 


. 25 




277, 


,20 


1 


,062, 


, 60 


1 


, 293 


, 60 




80 


,85 


1 


, 258, 


,18 


1 


,068 


.76 




993, 


, 30 




981, 


.75 


6 


, 883, 


,03 




549 , 


,01 



Dee, Helena A. $ 

DeFord, William & Elinor S. 
De Jesus, John & Geneva Ann 
Demone, Harold W. & Elsie R. 
Denehy, Edward J. & Bernadette J. 
Denese, Mary E. 
Denio, F. Winchester 
Denisevich, Helen 
DeNormandie, James, Executor 
DeNormandie, James 
DeNormandie, James, Cannon, 

Ellen DeN. & Cope, Alice DeN. 
DeNormandie, James & Martha 
Derderian, Edith H, 
desCognets, Archer B. &, 

Gwendolyn G. 
Dewey, Davis R. , II 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Dickey, Dana H. & Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. & Julia G. 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. & Teresa E. 
Diminico, Louis & Antonetta 
DiPerna, John F # , Nicola, 

Anthony J., Fannie & Ferrante, 

Charles J. 
Dixon, George M. & Anna R. 
Dixon, Russell J. & Theresa J. 
Dodge, Arthur C. & Dorothea S. 
Doherty, Mary E., Margaret A., 

Mar j or ie 
Doherty, Matthew H. & Elizabeth H. 
Doherty 's Garage, Inc. 
Domenichella , Dominic 
Domenichella , Mattie M. 
Donaldson, Estate of Charlotte H. 
Gordon A. & Elizabeth 
Malcolm L. 
Robert D. 
Robert D . , Jr . 
Robert D . , Jr . , 

Malcolm L., Donald P., 

Gordon A. , Charlotte L. &. 

Peck , Jean E . 
Donnell, Samuel H. & Marion L. 
Donovan, Leo A. & Elinor C. 
Dorian, Newart 

Dorrington, Richard W. & Phyllis 
Doughty, Joseph M. & Martha L. 
Downing, Grace L. 



$ 



70 



1 , 650 
900 



Donaldson , 
Donaldson , 
Donald son , 
Donaldson , 
Donaldson , 



6 
11 

9 
33 
17 
12 

5 
13 
30 
42 

11 

37 

5 

20 
26 
25 
6 
9 
10 
20 



600 
240 
750 
300 
250 
900 
920 
570 
750 
380 

770 
120 
630 

780 
320 
880 
600 
040 
360 
250 



3 ,980 

750 

7 . 200 



8 

3 
13 
15 

1 
15 
13 
12 
12 
89 

7 



250 

600 
800 
150 
050 
440 
880 
900 
750 
390 
130 



11 ,400 




877.80 


15 , 680 


1 


, 207.36 


23 , 850 - 


1 


, 836.45 


6 , 300 




485.10 


1 , 580 




121.66 


7 , 570 




582.89 


7 , 500 




577.50 



264 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY 1. 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Drake, Lillian W. & Garmory, $ 

Bertha V. 
Drew, Frederic T. & Shirley D. 
Dreyfus, Pierre M. & Dorothy R. 
Dougherty, Denis M. & Marion C. 
Dougherty, Mary Grace, Adm. 
Dow, Sterling, III &. Eleonore P. 
Duane , Jerome J. & Rosalind Gail 
DuBois, Anson M. & Olive S. 
DuBois, Eliot &, Barbara 
Duffy, James E., Ill & Barbara G. 
Durnan, John P. &, Leona E. 
Dustin, Daniel E. & Rachel S. 
Dwyer , James L. &, Carol 
Dwyer, Warren R. & Ma r i 1 y n H . 

Eas t , Edla A. 

Eaton, Gertrude S. 

Eckhardt, Homer D. & Mary G. 

Edgell, Henry W. 

Edmonds, Dean S., Jr. &, Louise W. 

Ehlert, Caroline E. 

Elliott, Robert H. & Ethel M. 

Elliott, William G. & Peggy P. 

Emerson, Claire G. 

Emmons, A. Bradlee & Judith R. 

England, Albert E. & Priscilla S. 

Eppling, Frederic J. &, Sarah J. 

Erickson, Leonard V. & Martha F. 

Ericson, Herbert E. & Erlyne R. 

Ernst, Martin L. & Lois 0. 

Evangelista, Florenzo T. & 

Dorothy L. 
Evans, Lucius W. & Virginia C. 

Faddoul , George P. & Natalie A. 
Faran, James J. &, Ellen G. 
Farley, Louis C., Jr. & Isabel K. 
Farrell, Philip J. & Ruth E. 
Faunce, Anthony 
Faunce, Mary Gill & Anthony 
Fedock, Metro & Hazel A. 
Felegian, Peter &, Marion 0. 
Fell, Florence C. & Beverly 
Fenijn, Chris J. & Yvonne 
Fenton, Dean E. & Barbara L. 
Fernald , George H. & Eleanor T. 
Field, Warwick F., Jr. & 

Rosamond R. 
Filbin, Robert & Eva M. 



$ 



70 



7 


880 




606, 


, 76 


4 


730 




364, 


.21 


24, 


680 


1 


,900 


, 36 


5 


700 




438 


,90 


6 


070 




467 


, 39 


8 


550 




658 


. 35 


18 


150 


1 


, 397 


, 55 


7 


510 




578 


.27 


11 


330 




872, 


,41 


14 


700 


1 


, 131 


,90 


9 


,600 




739, 


, 20 


10 


120 




779 


, 24 


7 


700 




592 


,90 


10 


800 




831 


. 60 


8 


250 




635 


,25 


11 


400 




877, 


,80 


12 


630 




972, 


.51 


22 


370 


1 


, 722 


,49 


29 


250 


2 


, 252 


, 25 


8 


820 




679 


.14 


8 


170 




629 


.09 


18 


520 


1 


, 426 


.04 


7 


, 500 




577 


, 50 


14 


020 


1 


,0 79 


.54 


21 


000 


1 


, 617 


.00 


9 


370 




721 


.49 


7 


720 




594 


. 44 


14 


250 


1 


, 097 


. 25 


22, 


130 


1 


, 704 


.01 


6 


830 




525, 


,91 


24 


970 


1 


,922 


,69 


11 


030 




849 


.31 


16 


, 290 


1 


, 254, 


,33 


13 


570 


1 


,044, 


,89 


13, 


800 


1 


,062, 
5 


, 60 
, 39 


18 


230 


1 


,403 


.71 


5 , 


170 




398, 


.09 


10 , 


050 




773, 


,85 


7, 


200 




554, 


.40 


11 , 


180 




860 , 


,86 


8 , 


550 




658, 


, 35 


15, 


150 


1 


,166, 


,55 


6 , 


670 




513, 


.59 


8 , 


550 




658 , 


,35 



265 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Es tate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 

Real and 

Per sonal 

Estate 



Fillmore, Bruce $ 

Fillmore, Bruce R. & Eleanor L. 
Finesinger, Abraham L. 
Finesinger, Abraham L. & Natalie 
Finke, Harry E. J. & Jo-Anne L. 
Finnerty, James J. &, Anna C. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 
First National Bank of Boston, 

Trustee 
Fisher, John W. 
Fitch, Marion A. 
Fitts, Charles K. (Estate of) & 

Gertrude W. 
Fitzgerald, John H. & Thelma C. 
Flaherty, Augusta D. 
Flanagan, James &. Wilhelmina G. 
Flannery, Donald J, & Harriet E. 
Flannery, Ralph & Constance H. 
Flansburgh, Earl R. & Louise H. 
Fleck, James D. &, Margaret E. 
Fleck, Richard C. & Frances R. 
Fleming, Clifford D. & E. Frances 
Flewelling, Roy S. & Thelma G. 
Flint, Edith F. 

Edward F. & Henry R. 

George B. & Lucie S. 

Josephine R. 

Warren F . 



40 



$ 



$ 



Flint, 
Flint, 
Flint, 
Flint, 
Floyd, 
Flynn , 



& Rita E. 



Olive B. 

Helen C . 
Foley, Harold F. 
Foley, Harold W. 
Forbes, Nancy S. 

Forbes, Sherman H. & Annabel Otis 
Forg, Nancy Harrington 
Fottler, Marshall A. & Angie K. 
Fougere, Guy L. & Pamela J. K. 
Foust, James L. &, Dorothy B. 
Fradd, Norman W. & Alberta A. 
Frank, Robert C. & Velma S. 
Fraser, Robert M. & Donna A. 
French, John B. & Deborah C. 
French, Lindol, Executor 
Fryatt, Thomas F. 
Fullerton, Albert L., Jr. & 
Mary S. 

Gagne , Lawrence E. & Dorothy Q. 
Gajewski, Ceslaus A. & Sophie 
Gandolfo, Matthew F. &, Frances L. 



7 
2 

30 
8 
8 

10 

8 
10 
22 

25 

4 
16 

1 

3 

8 
13 

3 
16 
13 
12 

2 
12 

7 

8 
20 

6 
13 

7 
14 

1 
14 

6 
15 

9 
11 

2 
10 
13 

7 

8 



12 

8 

10 



5 80 
700 
450 
850 
170 
870 

500 
870 
280 

120 
950 
420 
280 
150 
250 
120 
520 
050 
130 
450 
850 
010 
720 
250 
550 
970 
430 
200 
700 
420 
400 
380 
670 
600 
380 
020 
480 
350 
280 
350 
990 

950 

900 
250 

800 



3 
583 
207 
2 , 344 
681 
629 
836 



1 ,934 
381 

1 , 264 

98 

242 

635 

1 ,010 
271 

1 , 235 

1 ,011 
958 
219 
924 
594 
635 

1 ,582 
536 

1 ,034 
554 

1 ,131 
109 

1 ,108 

29 

513 

1 , 201 
722 
848 
190 
796 

1 ,022 
565 
692 



08 
66 
90 
65 
45 
09 
99 



654.50 

836.99 

1 , 715.56 



.24 
.15 
.34 
.56 
.55 
.25 
.24 
.04 
.85 
.01 
.65 
.45 
.77 
.44 
.25 
.35 
.69 
.11 
.40 
.90 
.34 
.80 
.26 
.59 
.20 
. 26 
.54 
.96 
.95 
.56 
.95 
.23 



1 , 305.15 

993. 30 
635 .25 
831.60 



266 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Garland, Joseph &. Mira C. $ 
Garrison, David L. &, Alice E. 
Garrison, John B. &. Barbara F. 
Gary, John E. &, Maida F. 
Gatchell, G. Gordon, Jr. &, 

Esther A. 
Gentile, Joseph F. & Kathleen E. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. &, Sareen R. 
Gilbert, George H. & Rebecca A. 
Gilbert, John W. & Josephine L. 
Gilbert, Mary J. 
Gilbert, Peter F. & Zeta M. 
Giles, Thomas F. (Estate of) &, 

Stella A. 
Gilfoy, Donald A. & Helen B. 
Giurleo, James M. &. Mary C. 
Gleason, Nancy W. J. 
Goddard, Richard B. & Alice L. 
Goodwin, Herbert F. & Elizabeth 
Gordon, Marie C. 
Gordon, Robert D. & Nancy M. 
Gounaris, Thomas X. & Jean G. 
Grabill, Elliott V. & Martha L. 
Graf , Mai colm 

Grande, Orlando S. &, Rose P. 
Gras, Ranulf 150 

Gras , Ranulf W. & Annette E. 
Grason, Rufus L. &, Edna B. 
Gray , Rober t W . 

Greaves, Allan W. & Theresa D. 
Greene, Frederick H. , Jr. &. Helen 
Gregg, Earl F. & Doris H. 
Grim, William M. , Jr. & Barbara 
Grinnell, William L. & Virginia 
Gropius, Walter & Ilse 
Gross, T. A. 0. & Judith C. F. 
Grover , C. Stuart &, Gunilda G. 
Gunaris, Theodore & Rheta D. 
Gustafson, Craig S. & Louise M. 
Guy, Donald C. & M. Cynthia 

Haagensen, Duane B. &, Frances J. 
Haartz, John C., Jr. &. Beatrice 
Haden, Russell L., Jr. &, 

Cons tanc e J. 
Hagenian, Joseph C. &, Irene R. 
Hagmann , Otto 
Hagmann , Otto & Katherine 
Hagopian, Richard G. &, Helen 
Hale, Donald G. & Frances 



$ 



2 
10 
12 
19 

8 

9 

15 

7 

4 

4 

13 

3 
18 
13 
17 

4 
25 

6 
15 

7 
19 

3 
21 

11 

9 
12 

5 
16 
14 

8 
13 
21 
10 
11 

7 
11 
17 

10 
16 

20 
6 
5 
7 

10 
6 



280 
200 
270 
050 

770 
000 
300 
350 
500 
880 
950 

080 
790 
950 
630 
650 
650 
470 
980 
500 
500 
530 
750 

400 
920 
670 
700 
430 
890 
850 
650 
530 
430 
850 
500 
850 
570 

950 
500 

170 
450 
880 
800 
050 
150 



S 



175 

785 

944 

1 , 466 

675 
693 

1 , 178 
565 
346 
375 

1 , 074 



23 

1 , 44 

1 , 07 

1 , 35 

35 

1,97 

49 

1 , 23 

57 

1 , 50 

27 

1 , 67 

1 

87 

76 

97 

43 

1 , 26 

1,14 

68 

1 ,05 

1 , 65 

80 

91 

57 

91 

1 . 35 



843 
1 , 270 

1 , 553 
496 
452 
600 
773 
473 



267 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY l. 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Haley, Whitney W. & Barbara $ 
Hall, Cecil E. & Nancy E. 
Hall, Henry P. & Barbara G. 
Hall, Thomas C. & Mary M. 
Halsey, William A. & Leila W. 
Hamilton, Harry A. & Bessie E. 
Hankey, Francis W. & Edna J. 
Hanlon, Catherine L. 
Hanneman, Roger W. & Marion N. 
Hannon, William H. , Jr. &, Louise 
Hanson, Adler M. & Madeline A. 
Hapgood, Norman, Jr. & Ruth K. 
Hardy, Harriet L. 
Harney, Gregory G. , Jr. & 

Elizabeth E. 
Hartwell Farm 2,250 

Haroian, Henry & Jessie S. 
Harrington, Clifford F., Jr. & 

Winthrop W. , Jr . 
Harrington, Winthrop W. & 

Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harris, John N. & Naomi A. 
Harris, Roger W. & Evelyn B. 
Hart, Joseph S. 
Hartman, Henry F. 
Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood , Reed 

Hatsopoulos, George N. & Daphne 
Hawes, Donald 0. & Lillian B. 
Haworth, George G. & Thelma E. 
Hayes, John R. &, Barbara W. 
Haytayan, Harry M. &, Katherine J. 
H. B. Knowles, Inc. 3,220 

Healey, Harry R. , Jr. &, Jeanne C. 
Healy, Edward M. & Helen T. 
Heart, Frank E. & Jane S. 
Heck, Mary Higbee 
Hedge, Mary A. 

Helburn, Peter & Levin, Alvin 
Helburn, Peter &, Margaret 
Held, Arnold E. & Mary A. 
Hellman, Maurice H. &, Dolores T. 
Hemry, Leslie P. & Mary Jane 
Henderson, Ernest, Henderson, 

Ernest, III, & Roberts, 

Margaret M. , Trustees 
Henderson, Gerard C. &, Edith M. 
Henderson, Robert S. 190 

Henderson, Robert S. & Carolyn H. 
Henley, Merrill J. & Ida H. 



$ 



13 

12 

11 

18 

10 

6 

11 

8 

9 

1 

15 

7 

10 

7 

9 

3 

7 
7 

15 
2 
3 
5 

20 
2 

10 

10 

10 
8 

21 
9 

11 
8 

49 

16 
5 
2 
7 
9 

19 



050 
450 
620 
530 
050 
380 
850 
150 
300 
650 
000 
650 
430 

800 

300 

520 

200 
500 
000 
100 
600 
170 
700 
250 
200 
800 
800 
620 
970 
070 
630 
250 
420 
580 
020 
550 
500 
750 
950 



$1 ,004 
958 
894 

1 ,426 
773 
491 
912 
627 
716 
127 

1 ,155 
589 
803 

600 
173 
716 

271 



55 
57 

1 ,15 
16 
27 
39 

1 ,59 
17 
78 
83 
83 
66 

1 ,93 
69 
89 
63 

3 , 80 

1 , 27 
38 
19 
57 
75 

1 ,53 



85 
65 
74 
81 
85 
26 
45 
55 
10 
05 
00 
05 
11 

60 
25 

10 

04 

40 
50 
00 
70 
20 
09 
90 
25 
40 
60 
60 
74 
63 
39 
51 
25 
34 
66 
54 
35 
50 
75 
15 



8 , 320 
10 ,960 



7, 800 
7 , 420 



640.64 
843.92 
14.63 
600.60 
571.34 



268 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Hennessy, Frank J., Jr. &. $ 

Pauline G. 
Herlin, Melvin Arnold & Eugenia 
Herman, William F. 

Herthel, Stephen W. L Evelyn S. 
Hester, Leon B. &. Mary B. 
Hibben, George C. &, Julia K. 
Hibben, Julia K. 
Hill, Jacques A. F. 
Hill, Walter L. &, Patricia C. 
Hoar, George W. &, Dorothy S. &. 

Hoar, Norman W. &. Shirley E. 
Holbrow, Frederick &, Florence G. 
Holdsworth, Dennis William &. Vega 
Holland, Taffy K. 
Holl ingswor th , Lowell M. &. 

Fl or ence S . 
Hollister, Walter M. & J. Sally 
Home National Bank of Brockton, 

Trustee 
Hoover, Henry B. &. Lucretia J. 
Hosey, John E. & Margaret L. 
Houghton, John J. &. Lillian 
Howard, Elizabeth F. 
Howard, Esther T. 
Hoyt, Harrison &. Shirley J. 
Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 

Humphreys, J. Robert &. M. Lillian 
Hunnewell, Willard P. 
Hunsaker , Jerome C., Jr. 
Hunt, Caroline L. 
Hunt, Merrill T. 

Huntley, George F. & Lottie D. 
Huntley, Medford E. & Blanche L. 
Hurd, Joseph & Nellie M. 
Hurd, Nancy Dabney 
Hurff, Joseph L. &, Elizabeth C. 
Husek, Joseph John &, Helen 
Hyde, Benjamin D. & Mildred B. 

Ingard, K. Uno &, Doris C. 
Irwin, Constance Root & Ayer , 

Harriet Root 
Irwin, Mary M. 

Jackson, Dorothy W. 

Jackson, Gardner, Jr. &, Sallie 

Jackson, Huson &, Polly F. 

Jacob, Fred & Eva 

Jacobs , May L. 



s 



s 



8 
15 
20 
19 
15 
8 
1 
12 
12 

14 

8 

10 

11 

13 
11 

12 

12 

7 

5 

3 

15 

8 

14 

6 

15 

30 

1 

16 

7 

6 

19 

14 

13 

9 

13 

14 



550 
830 
400 
730 
080 
320 
200 
380 
520 

550 
250 
050 
100 

150 
330 

300 
000 
880 
850 
000 
750 
620 
700 
300 
670 
530 
950 
450 
270 
150 
280 
400 
500 
040 
650 

400 



2 


620 


18 


, 300 


19 


870 


10 


730 


20 


180 


10 


050 


21 


300 



658 
1 , 218 
1 , 570 
1 ,519 
1 , 161 

640 
92 

953 

964 

1 , 120 
635 
773 
854 

1,012 
872 



94 
92 
60 
45 
23 
21 
66 
13 
48 
20 
35 
15 
26 
55 
47 
48 
10 
03 
69 
05 



108 

201 

409 

529 
826 
553 
773 
640 



35 
91 
80 
21 
16 
64 
40 
26 
04 

35 
25 
85 
70 

55 
41 

10 
00 
76 
45 
00 
75 
74 
90 
10 
59 
81 
15 
65 
79 
55 
56 
80 
50 
08 
05 

80 

74 
10 

99 
21 
86 
85 
10 



269 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggr egate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 





Tax on 


R 


eal and 


P 


er sonal 




Es tat e 




890 


. 12 


1 


,871 


.10 




867 


.02 




704 


.55 


1 


,027 


.95 


1 


, 155 


.00 




386 


.54 




600 


. 60 




866 


.25 




907 


.06 




411 


.18 


1 


, 426 


.04 




618 


. 31 


1 


, 547 


.70 




277 


.20 




635 


.25 




758 


.45 




421 


.96 


2 


, 113 


.65 




779 


.24 


1 


,161 


.16 


1 


,044 


.89 




525 


.91 




92 


.40 




767 


.69 




658 


,35 




57 


.75 




756 


.14 




5 7 


,75 




542 


.85 




721, 


.49 




866, 


.25 


1 


,033, 


.34 


1 


,414, 


.49 




716, 


.10 




767, 


,69 




750, 


,75 


1 


,968, 


.89 


1 


,178, 


,87 




605, 


,99 




773, 


,85 


1 


,027. 


,95 


1 


, 386, 


,00 




894, 


74 




666, 


05 




693, 


00 


1 


,547, 


70 


1 


, 120, 


35 



Jagge 

Jame s 

Janes 

Jenne 

Jenne 

Jenni 

Jense 

J e n s e 

Jevon 

John , 

Johns 

Johns 

Johns 

John 

Jones 

Jozwi 



r, James M. & Miriam H. 
, Hamilton R. & Waleska E. 
, G. Sargent &, Ann B. 
y, Charles J. & Katrina C. 
y, Phyllis M. 
ngs , Charles E. & Ann V. 
n, Holgar J. & Grace A. 
n, Olin A. & Agnes E. 
, Robert W. & Virginia B. 
DeWitt & Morley M. 
on, Albert D. 
on, Ernest L. &, Gr ace M . 
on, Kenneth A. & Gladys 
Swanson Realty Corporation 
, Ira M. 
cki, Alfons & Adeline C. 



$ 



$ 



Kaelber, Edward G. & Patricia C. 
Kane, Henry B. &, Elizabeth C. 
Kasperian, Karl D. & Carol 0. 
Kaye, Harold & Alice S. 
Keay, Donald P. & Mary Ann L. 
Keevil , Charles S., Jr. & 

Hannah M. 
Keily, Delbar P. & Gertrude E. 
Keizer, Harold 
Kelleigh, Beatrice S. 
Kelley, M. Gertrude 
Kennedy, Albert E. 
Kennedy, Albert E. & John T. 
Kennedy Brothers 

Kennedy, John E. & Katherine J. 
Kent, Harold E. & Muriel B. 
Kessel, Joseph B. & Lesley J. 
Ketchum, Phillips, Jr. & Anne C. 
Keuper , Charles S. & Elinore W. 
Keye s , Janet T. 

Kind leber ger , Charles P. &, Sarah 
King, R. Bruce, Jr. & Eleanor T. 
King, William T. 
Kingsbury, Roy S. & Ann B. 
Kinsler, Louise M. 
Kirby, Gerard L. 

Kirkpatrick, David W. &, Margaret 
Kis t iakowsky , Irma E. 
Kjellander, Joel &, Mary C. 
Kling, John W. & Louise H. 
Knowles, Wilma E. 

Kolligian, Gregory Scott & Zoe 
Kolodny, Myer Z. & M. Lillian 



750 



11 
24 
11 

9 
13 
15 

5 

7 
11 
11 

5 
18 

8 
20 

3 

8 

9 

5 

2 7 

10 

15 

13 

6 
1 
9 
8 



7 

9 

11 

13 

18 

9 

9 

9 

25 

15 

7 

10 

13 

18 

11 

8 

9 

20 

14 



560 
300 
260 
150 
350 
000 
020 
800 
250 
780 
340 
5 20 
030 
100 
600 
250 

850 
480 
450 
120 
080 

570 
830 
200 
9 70 
550 
750 
820 

050 
370 
250 
420 
370 
300 
970 
750 
570 
310 
870 
050 
350 
000 
620 
650 
000 
100 
550 



270 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Es tat e 



Kolyshkin, Lena $ 

Kopp, Jay F. &, Marilyn J. 
Korhonen, Edwin J. &. Miriam 
Kramer, Manuel &, Ruth L. 
Kubik, Charles S. & Emily K. 
Kusleika, Steven & Louise C. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 

Lahnstein, Karl F. 

Landrey, William J. &. Rita M. 

Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 

Langton, William G. &, Jane G. 

Lankhorst, Beverly P. 

Larrabee , Leonard C. &, Peggy S. 

Larson, John B. &, Mafalda M. 

Laverty, Charles &. Lillian L. 

Lavine, Jerome M. & Mary C. 

Lavrakas , Fof o 

Law, John H. &, Nancy 

Lawrence, David B. & 

Lawrence, Lincoln C. 

Lawson, Harold E. 

Lawson, Harold E. 

Leathern, Ernest F 

Leathern, Evelyn K 

Leavitt, Donald P 

Lee, Paul H. & Frances Sue 

Lee, Shih Ying & May C. 

Leger, Mary E., Trustee 

Lemander, William C. &, Emily K. 

LeMann , John 

Lemire, Robert A. &, Virginia Mae 

Lenington, Robert L. & Carolyn J. 

Lennon , James V. & El in 

Leslie, Maurice A. & Annie 

Leslie, Maurice A. & Paul M. 

Lenzi, Nicholas 

Leslie, Paul M. & Elizabeth M. 

Lev in , Alv in 

Levin, Alvin & Betty 

Li, Yao T. & Nancy T. 

Liddick, Harold S. & Virginia D. 

Liepins, Atis A. & Diana 

Light, Galen D., Jr. & Lois M. 

Lightbody, John W., Sr . & Muriel 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Lincoln, John W. &, Clarinda Y. 

Lincoln Plumbing &, Heating Co. 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lindsay, Franklin A. & Margot C. 



$ 



F. 

Priscilla M. 
& Blanche P. 



& Wanda E. 
&, Evelyn K. 

& Chr i st ine P, 



1 , 050 



600 
120 



1 ,500 

300 

450 



4 
16 

7 
10 
12 
12 

2 

5 

15 

7 

10 

10 

8 

7 

16 

14 

2 

8 

12 

7 

11 
44 

13 
1 

18 
8 

19 
7 
6 

12 
6 
6 



580 
650 
870 
880 
900 
000 

620 
550 
680 
500 
500 
050 
850 
500 
050 
320 
630 
545 
080 
580 

550 
630 
900 
880 
050 
380 
550 
500 
060 
450 
750 
820 
280 
150 



S 



7 , 130 



10 , 350 
21 , 380 

10 , 580 

1 , 520 

9 , 300 

15 , 000 



11 ,180 



3 , 380 



1 



352 
1 , 282 
605 
837 
993 
924 

201 

427 

1 , 207 

577 

825 

773 

681 

577 

. 235 

1 , 102 

202 

657 

930 

583 

80 

889 

3 , 436 

69 

1 ,068 

80 

1 , 415 

658 

1 ,501 

543 

496 

981 

525 

483 

11 

46 

549 

9 

796 

1 , 646 

814 

117 

716 

1 ,155 

115 

860 

23 

34 

260 



271 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Es tat e 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Lingos, John G. , Stamatia, $ $ 

Geor ge 
Linstrom, Peter J. &, Maybelle L. 
Li t te , Rudolph 

Little, John D. C. & Elizabeth A. 
Livengood, Eleanor C. H. 
Lo, Steven Shih Ting & Yi-Chao M. 
Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. & Irene P. 
Loesel, Robert A. & Mary be 11 
Loewens tein , Paul & Sophie 
Long, Dorothy S. 
Long, L. Bruce & Mary Louise 
Lorrey, Mildred J. 
Loud, John F. & Mary L. 
Loveys , Harriet E., Adm . 
Lummus , John W. & Ann A. 
Lunt, Heirs of Charles 
Lustwerk, Ferdinand 
Lutnicki, Victor A. & Harriet H. 
Lynch, Edward H. & Madeline M. 
Lyon , Ruth 

Lyons, John J. & Ann V. 
Lyons, Martin & Winifred A. 

MacFarland, Charles C. & Phyllis 
Maclnnis, Daniel A., Jr. & 

Frances M. 
Maclnnis, Isobel A. 
Maclnnis, Shirley A. 
Mackenzie, Roland C. 
Maclaurin, Elfriede 
Maclaurin, Ellen 

Mac Lean, H. Arnold &, Corinne C. 
MacLeod, Edward & Hester M. 
MacLeod, Edward, Jr. & Mary M. 
MacNeil, Phyllis 70 

MacRae , Manning W. (Estate of) 

& Nina W. 
Mahan , Russell P. & Ana stasia 
Maher , Raymond & Gertrude M. 
Maher , Raymond Jay &, Adeline 
Mahoney Brothers, Inc. 450 

Mahoney , Gerald J. &, Jeanne M. 
Maier , Emanuel & Sylvia 
Mallett, Herbert A. & Eva M. 
Malloy, Robert M. 750 

Malloy, Robert M. & Irene C. 
Mai one, Charles 

Mannarino, Joseph & Florence A. 
Manning, Joseph J. &, Catherine L. 



$ 



& Ethel L. 



15 

7 

12 

13 

5 

9 

24 

7 

13 

8 

16 

8 

15 

12 

12 

4 

11 

19 

6 

6 

6 

5 



6 

17 

1 

18 

20 

16 

9 

4 

3 

10 

8 

12 

4 

7 

14 

10 

18 

4 

38 

25 

2 

4 

7 



750 
500 
750 
420 
780 
000 
300 
880 
430 
550 
120 
520 
820 
750 
530 
570 
100 
350 
300 
370 
830 
330 

200 

000 
85 
500 
750 
320 
280 
150 
600 
000 
500 

330 
600 
350 
050 
175 
120 
830 
200 
530 
870 
550 
270 
420 



1 , 21 
57 
98 

1 ,03 
44 
69 

1 ,87 
60 

1 ,03 
65 

1 , 24 
65 

1 , 21 
98 
96 
35 
85 

1 ,48 
48 
49 
52 
41 



554 

462 

1 , 374 

115 

1 ,443 

1,564 

1 , 25 3 

704 

354 

231 

813 

641 
970 
334 
5 42 

1 ,126 
779 

1 ,449 
323 

3,024 

1 ,991 
196 
328 
571 



272 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 19 64 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Value of 


Value of 


Per sonal 


Real 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 8 , 250 




9 , 150 




14 , 630 




26 , 540 




11 , 700 




8 , 620 




7 , 280 




9 , 600 


J. 


12 , 750 




6 , 710 




1 , 650 




12 , 300 




6 ,900 




7 , 730 




6 , 750 




17 , 770 


150 






18 , 080 




450 




6 , 000 




19 ,950 




5 , 330 




17 , 250 




2 , 250 




15 ,000 




1 , 420 




9 ,900 




13 , 640 




6 , 600 




2 ,020 




6 , 680 




5 , 700 




4, 120 




10 ,050 




7 , 500 




2, 780 




5 ,180 




9 , 340 




6 , 300 




12,600 




10 ,800 




15 ,980 




10 , 800 




7 ,950 




7 ,120 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Manzelli, John &, Dorothy 

Mar, James W. & Edith 

Marchetti, John W. &. Sarah G. 

Maroni, Jacques R. 

Marsh, Paul Everhart &. Margaret 

Br eed 
Martin, John 0. & Candida W. 
Martin, Robert T. & Margaret M. 
Martin, Spencer F., Jr. &. 

Carol ine F . 
Martini, William F. & Virginia J. 
Mascari, Grace B. 
Mascari, Leonard E. &, Grace B. 
Maselli, Aldo G. & F. Claire 
Mason, Hayden & Jean C. 
Mason, Max, Jr. & Betty M. 
Mason, Richard K. & Ann E. 
Mayfield, Glover B. & Gale S. 
Maxwell , Ralph E. 
Maxwell, Ralph E. & Phyllis B. 
McCarthy, William F. 
McCausland, Gordon C. & 

Elizabeth C. 
McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 
McConnon, George J. & Esther G. 
McCune, William J. & Elizabeth 
McEnness, Harold F. 
McGrath, James F. & Mary F. 
McHugh, John Edward, Admr . 
McHugh, Mary F. 
McKennan, William & Alice W. 
McKnight, David B. & Eleanor J. 
McKnight, David B. & Ernest T. 
McKnight, Wilmot & Katherine E. 
McLellan, John W. & Julia C. 
McLeod, James & Ethel B. 
McMurtry, George C. & Rose Mary 
McNamee, John F., Ill 
McNulty, Thomas F. & Mary S. 
Meade, Edmund J. & Eleanor H. 
Mead, Varnum R. & Janice H. 
Melanson, Leonard J. & Mary 
Mellish, Eugene D. & Nancy 
Menna, Andrew A. & Frances 
Meriam, Richard S. & Alice G. 
Merrill, Henry M. , Jr. & 

Priscilla 0. 
Merrill, Vincent N. & Anne S. 
Messina, Jaspare & Grazia 
Meyer, James W. 



S 



635 
704 

1 , 126 

2 , 043 

900 
663 
560 

739 
981 
516 
127 
947 
531 
595 
519 

1 , 368 
11 

1 , 392 
34 



46 

1 , 53 
41 

1 , 32 
17 

1 , 15 
10 
76 

1 , 05 
50 
15 
51 
43 
31 
77 
57 
21 
39 
71 
48 
97 
83 

1 ,23 



150 



831 

612 

548 

11 



273 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Meyer, James W. & Carol H. $ 
Meyer, Robert V. &, Eugenie S. 
Meyer s , Saul S . 

Militzer, Raymond E. & Martha B. 
Millar, Philip N. & Winifred M. 
Millard, Donald A. & Jeannette D. 
Miller, Joseph F. G. &, Paula A. L 
Mills, Cecil R. & Lillian M. 
Mintz, Norbett L. & Sophie B. 
Miser, Hugh J. & Josephine L. 
Mix, Thomas R. & Helen 
Mixon, Scott I. & Isabel 
Molloy, Joseph E. & Janet F. 
Monks, John P. (Estate of) & 

Ann S . 
Moody, Charles P. & Josephine G. 
Moor, Edgar J. & Joan R. 
Moore, John E., Trustee, 

Emerson Trust 
Moore, Laurence & Eleanor 
Moore , Paul 

Moore, Robert L. & Dorothy H. 
Morette, Walter J. & Gertrude C. 
Morey, Kenneth & Ruth I. 
Morgan, Henry M. & Gwen G. 
Morgan, Richard S. 
Morgan, Richard S. & Molly H. 
Morris, Milliage E. & Beatrice M. 
Morris, Robert E. F 
Morris, Robert H. & 
Morse, Thomas R. 
Morse, William H. 

Morse, William H. & Marguerite D. 
Moss, Leonard G. & Frances S. 
Moss, Richard William & Barbara B 
Mount, Wayne D. & Claire L. 
Mrakovich, Vincent F. &, Rosemary 
Mukhitarian, Samuel &, Stephanie 
Murphy, Cyrus W. & Per sis S. 
Murphy, Daniel J. &. Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. 
Murphy, Mary B. 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Murphy, William F. &, Ruth M. 
Myles, Theresa Anne &, J. Richard 

Naiman, Mark L. & Adeline L. 
Napoli, Joseph J. 

Natoli, Donald J. & Lois M. 

Navon, David H. &, Roberta 



$ 



& Clara D. 
Irene S. 



80 



70 



12 

10 

25 
4 

26 

10 
5 
1 

18 
9 

12 
4 

66 
11 
18 

38 
25 

14 
8 
6 

15 

11 
3 
5 

7 
16 

5 
9 

13 
9 

10 
6 
7 
7 
9 
7 
5 

16 

16 

7 
16 
10 
16 



980 
800 
980 
800 
350 
620 
720 
620 
500 
150 
530 
820 
120 

380 
100 
100 

800 
890 
80 
100 
630 
750 
010 

470 
950 
850 
200 
800 

250 
150 
800 
380 
500 
380 
720 
050 
050 
050 
400 
270 
580 

800 
420 
570 
650 



$ 



999 
831 
75 

1 ,986 

334 

2 ,049 

825 
432 
115 
1 , 397 
733 
987 
317 

5 , 111 

854 

1 , 393 



2,98 
1 ,99 

1 ,08 
66 
51 

1 ,15 

88 
30 
45 
55 
1 ,29 

40 

70 

1 ,06 

72 

80 

49 

59 

54 

75 

54 

41 

1 , 25 

1 , 27 



7 

3 

6 

5 

4 

9 

5 

6 

3 

4 



4 

3 

5. 

4 

4 

2 

2 

8 

1 

4 

2 

8 

2 

5 

2 

6 



600 
1 , 264 

813 
1 , 282 



46 
60 
46 
60 
95 
74 
44 
74 
50 
55 
81 
14 
24 

26 
70 
70 

60 
53 
16 
70 
51 
75 
77 
16 
19 
15 
45 
40 
60 
39 
25 
55 
60 
26 
50 
26 
44 
85 
45 
85 
80 
79 
66 

60 
34 
89 

05 



274 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

E s tat e 



H . &. Di ana 
&, Mar j or ie 



Neiley, Alexander 

Nelson, Albert E. 

Nelson, Duncan M. 

Nelson, Duncan M. &. Jean R. 

Nelson, Erik J. &, Dorothy G. 

Nelson, W. Newton & Eleanor R. 

Nesto, Bruno Richard &. Eugenia 



$ 



S 



70 



R 



Neumann, Ernest P. &. Sylvia B. 
Neville, James M. &. Mar jorie J. 
Newbold, Thomas 
Newell , Lena M. 
New England Tel. &, Tel. Co. 
Newman, Philip & Elsa L. 
Newton, George C. , Jr. 
Newton, George C. , Jr. &. 

El izabeth E . 
Newton, Harland B. &. Ethel A. 
Newton, Hazel H. 
Nichols, Walter &. Ethel D. 
Niles, John B. &. Muriel L. 
Niles, Robert L. &. Virginia M. 
Norton, Paul L. 
Norton, Paul L. &. Margaret 
Novak, Kalman & Nellie R. 
Nystrom, Foster H. &, Edna C. 

O'Brien, John H. &. Barbara M. 

Ogden , Dav id D. 

Ogden, David D. &. Joan A. 

Old County Realty Trust 

O'Leary, Paul J. &. Alyce M. 

Olivieri, James &. Dorothy M. 

Olmsted, Harriet A. 

Olsen, Kenneth H. &, Elva-Liisa A, 

Olsen, Ralph & Marcia E. 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. & Camilla M. 

Osborne, Gordon 

Osborne, Gordon & Freda W. 

Ouroussoff Builders, Inc. 

Outten, Henry P. &, Nancy K. 

Owen, Carleton W. 

Owen, Charles J. &, Mary Lee 

Paddock, Louis E. & Ann E. 
Page, Elliott F. & Emily R. 
Page, Lot B. & Patricia H. 
Page, Milton S. & Roberta M. 
Page, Stanley W. & Elisabeth H. 
Page, William N. (Estate of) & 
Elizabeth J. 



226 , 500 



70 



70 



1 , 270 



8 , 400 

9 , 750 

13 ,650 

7 , 500 

13 , 730 

11 , 770 

18 ,000 

4 , 130 

18 , 000 

9 . 380 



5 , 780 



12 

10 
8 
8 
6 

11 
3 

10 

12 
9 

15 

21 
5 

15 
6 

24 

21 
7 
5 

32 

16 

10 

4 

9 

10 
9 

15 
8 
7 



300 
130 
480 
480 
830 
470 
070 
570 
750 
750 

820 

680 
020 
750 
750 
980 
980 
510 
650 

900 
650 
800 
650 
600 

500 
000 
820 
620 
650 



$ 646 

750 

5 

1 , 051 

577 

1 ,057 

906 

1 , 386 

318 

1 , 386 

722 

1 7 , 440 

445 

5 

947 
780 
652 
652 
525 
883 
236 
813 
981 
750 



1,21 



1 , 66 
38 

1 , 21 
51 

1 ,92 

1 ,69 

57 

43 

9 

2 , 53 
1 , 28 

83 
35 
73 



808 
693 
1 , 218 
663 
589 



12,000 



924.00 



275 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Paige, Richard B. & Elizabeth $ 

Paine, Albert S. & Noelle W. 

Paino, Dolores M. 

Palmer, Attelio A, &, Kathryne 

Palmer, Eleanor M. 

Palmer, George B. , Jr. & 

Rosemary S . 
Panetta, Frank & Theresa J. 
Panetta, James J. &, Rosemary D. 
Panetta, Pasquale & Mary 
Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 
Paone , Mar y T. 
Paquette, Margaret 

Parish, Edward C., Jr. &, Joan DeF. 
Parker, Jackson B. &, Jacqueline S. 
Parsons, W. Chester &, Claire T. 
Pastoriza, James J. & Ruth B. 
Patterson, Robert F., Jr. &, 

Mary Ann 
Pattinson, Mary I. 
Pavlo, Jessie 
Pearmain, W. Robert 
Peavy, Leopold, Jr. 
Peck, Will V. & Mildred E. 
Peirce, Isabel T. 
Peloquin, Roy J. & Alice M. 
Pertzof f , Constantin 
Pertzoff , Constantin A. & Olga 
Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. & Mary E. 
Pettit, Kathreen N. 

Phillips, Henry B. & Charlotte T. 
Pickman, Anthony P. 
Pickman, Anthony & Alice L. 
Pierce, Charles Eliot & Dora R. 
Pike, John A. &, Mary S. 
Pino, Frank J. & Muriel E. 
Plant, Paul R. & Madeline L. 
Polumbaum, Theodore S. & Nyna 
Porter, Stanley D. &, Josephine 
Sholem 

L 



$ 



10 ,050 

150 

13 , 200 



$ 



& Claire P. 

&, Elizabeth J. 



150 



150 



Post el , 
Poul OS , 
Powell , 
Powell , 
Power s . 



Charles 

Neil H. 

Neil H. 

Clar a E 
Powers, Francis 
Pratt , Nancy A. 
Preston, Jean W. 
Pr imak , Lena 
Primak, John &, Lena 



& Sophie 
& An n i e L . 

Jr . & Hel en 



150 



L 



7 
12 

10 
12 
6 
8 
6 
1 

11 
13 
16 
13 

7 

10 

2 

10 

33 

6 

6 

6 

55 

62 

9 

9 

27 

23 
16 
12 

7 
12 
13 
13 

7 
15 

14 
8 
6 

35 

4 

13 



570 
230 

800 
750 
300 
560 
750 
580 
520 
100 
570 
880 
880 

500 
280 
100 
820 
900 
930 
900 
220 

130 
330 
320 
450 
790 

480 
650 
820 
650 
000 
500 
650 
350 
750 

020 
700 
300 
920 

100 
130 
440 



773 

11 

1 ,016 

582 

941 

831 

981 

485 

659 

519 

121 

40 

854 

1 ,044 

1 ,299 

1 ,068 

577 
791 
161 
833 

2 , 610 

533 

531 

478 

11 

4, 245 

4, 799 

717 

727 

2 , 1^39 

11 

1 , 807 

1 , 282 

987 

589 

924 

1 ,039 

1 ,051 

565 

1 , 212 

11 

1 ,079 

669 

485 

70 

2 , 702 

318 
1 ,034 



276 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Quarton, Gardner &. Frances 



$ 



$ 26,050 



$2 ,005 . 85 



Reservoir Nu rsing Home, Inc. 

Radasch, Donald &, Margaret R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. & Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. 8c Ellen A. 

Ralston, Robert 

Rand, Lucy Kimball 

Rand , William M. , Jr . 

Rand, William M. & Prise ilia W. 

Ran do, Giovanina 

Rando , Thomas 

Rapperport, Eugene John &. Lucy 

He iman 
Rappoli, Arthur E. &. Dorothy H. 
Rawson , Edward B. &. Nancy B. 
Reece, Richard C. &, Susan W. 
Reed, Kenneth C. & Margaret M. 
Rego, Manuel J. & Catherine 
Rhodes, Timothy & Janet 
Ricci, Joseph, Louis, Fred &. 

Char les 
Rice, Arthur W., Jr. & Pauline K. 
Rice, Earl S. &. Naoma F, 
Rice, James F. , Jr. & Barbara A. 
Rich, Howard L., Jr. & Ruth R. 
Richardson, Frederick C. 
Richardson, John A. W. &, Anna H. 
Richardson, Lyle 
Riley, Allston & Marion H. 
Risch, Martin D. &. Joan C. 
Robbins, Roland W. & Geraldine 
Robey, A. Alexander & Harriet S. 
Robichaud, "George U. & Emma 
Robinson, Dora A. 
Rodimon, Mildred M. 
Rodrick, William D. & Alice E. 
Roehr , George L. & Marcia A. 
Rogers, Alfred P. 
Rogers, Alfred P. & George E., 

Trustee s 
Rogers, David F. 
Rogers, David F. 
Rogers, Mabel le, 

E vel yn 
Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 
Rollins, Barbara 
Rollins, J. Leslie & Barbara 
Rollins, Oliver W. & Hala P. 
Rood, Allan & Jane 



40 



& Har r iet J. 
Winifred & 





20 




1 . 


10 , 


050 




773. 


9 


200 




708. 


6 , 


450 




496. 


15 , 


750 


1 


, 212. 


26 


100 


2 


,009 . 
3. 


11 


550 




889 . 


27 


300 


2 


, 102. 


10 


800 




831 . 


11 


620 




894. 


9 


750 




750. 


13 


950 


1 


, 074. 


14 


930 


1 


,149. 


12 


820 




987. 


8 


, 250 




635. 


9 


820 




756. 


4 


950 




381 . 


21 


010 


1 


,617. 


10 


, 200 




785. 


6 


750 




519 . 


22 


, 730 


1 


, 750. 


11 


020 




848. 


14 


, 700 


1 


,131 . 


19 


, 280 


1 


,484. 


16 


, 500 


1 


, 270. 


7 


, 650 




589. 


6 


370 




490. 


24 


000 


1 


, 848. 


8 


400 




646. 


5 


170 




398. 


5 


, 700 




438. 


9 


750 




750. 


3 


,600 




277. 


14 


,850 


1 


,143. 


5 


, 860 




451. 




220 




16. 


7 


, 350 




565. 


11 


,920 




917. 


7 


, 800 




600. 




220 




16. 


13 


, 880 


1 


,068. 


11 


, 850 




912. 


10 


, 200 




785. 



277 



V.-ZL'Z.-ZZZ " 1157 









-a. , 



■llliaa C. L lLar i = - 1*. 
7i::i5 Z L 3:::= f 



-e- r _ . L r = l-- 



: 






i-T =~ 






:■;::;.: 






_ ::-- i 



- : 



~ . ~:: 

2,100 
12,530 

f I " " 

: : if : 



15,900 

is, ::: 

12,600 

: : i : : 



2,400 

i : : : : 

: ::I 
5,1=1 

10,240 

-. : ". 

- 12: 

5,620 

: 2 : 

4,430 
10 , 200 

is, € : : 

e - : : 

2 3 .020 

1 = : ' 



15.9 



: -=: 

=■ 45: 



l~ _ : 



: : 

7, 



721, 
1.790, 

: 

1 , 224, 

~_ : 1 1 
: : : 

: 12: 

_ ~ -. 

~ \z 
~~ 

: r \ 

-. : : 
z : : 

1,772, 
1,437. 

1,224, 

'- — 
"-- '- , 

: : - 

75. 

: 253. 

- - — « 

Z, i ' 

-: " . 


. -.7 

.25 

. :-: 
. : : 

. : : 

. : - 

i -_ 

.74 

? : 
-:-. 
-: : 

: : 

-:-. 

-: : 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 19 6 4 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Per sonal 

Estate 



Seeckts, E. William &. Eleanor $ 

Selfridge, Oliver G. & Allison 

Senders, John W. &, Virginia L. 

Sexton , Ma u r i c e J . 

Shambaugh, Benjamin &, Joan D. 

Shansky , David & Nettie 

Shapiro, David &. Esther 

Shapiro, Sylvia C. 

Sharpe, William, Jr. &. Elaine D. 

Sha 



$ 



w 



Alice DeS. 



Shea, William J. & Margaret T. 

Sherman, Daniel E. , Jr. &. Sadie J. 

Sherwin, Edward V. 

Shimansky, Stanley J. &, Eugenia C. 

Shomphe , Patrick W. & Annie B. 

Shurling, Watson & Emily I. 

Siler, William C. & Barbara Jean 

S ilva , Mary E . 

Silva, Walter J. & Lucille J. 

Simms, Hugh P. & Margaret J. 

Simonds, Anthony J. 

Simonds, Lena J. 

Simourian, John & Lillian M. 

Sisson, John H. & Barbara B. 

Smith, Carl D. & Florence C. 

Smith, C. DeWitt & Margaret L. 

Smith, John E., Trustee 

Smi th , Sumner 

Smith, William B. & Mae W. 

Smith, William J. & Barbara J. 

Smulowicz, Bronislaw &. Sawera 

Smyth, Robert Ralston & Adella C. 

Snelling, Charles A. 

Snelling, Dorothy R. 

Snelling, Howard &, Elizabeth J. 

Snelling, John Rudolf 

Snider, Greta W. 

Sorenson, Heirs of Hans 

Southack, Theodore L., Jr. & 

Marion B. 
Spaeth, Daniel A. & Margaret A. 
Spence, Robert A. & Helen M. 
Spencer, Henry W. & Marguerite G. 
Spooner, Frederick C. & Sarah W. 
Spooner , Lily T. 
Stebbins, Herbert A., Jr. & 

Patr ic ia R. 
Stevens, Frank R. & Katherine L. 
Stevens, Kimball C. & Eleanor G. 
Stevenson, John P. & Patricia A. 



450 



11 

12 

4 

6 

10 

11 

10 

1 

13 

30 

7 

9 

3 

6 

10 

2 

8 

26 

9 

7 

8 

19 

16 

9 

26 

7 
45 
8 
4 
13 
9 
6 
6 
7 
1 
2 
5 

19 
13 
11 
23 
5 
7 

7 
18 
10 
13 



800 
150 
500 
370 
500 
470 
870 
120 
870 
530 
870 
080 
680 
230 
350 
180 
250 
340 
830 
350 
250 
750 
580 
870 
080 
620 
200 
310 
550 
650 
800 
670 
600 
300 
650 
050 
850 
780 

500 
200 
030 
250 
470 
070 

800 
370 
500 
500 



$ 



908 
935 
346 
490 
808 
883 
836 
86 

1 ,067 

2 , 350 

605 
699 
283 
479 
796 
167 
635 

2 , 028 

756 

565 

669 

57 

1 , 507 

1 , 298 

699 

2 ,049 

554 

3 ,488 

658 
358 
1 ,062 
744 
508 
485 
589 
80 
219 
445 

1 ,501 

1 ,016 

849 

1 , 790 

421 

544 

600 
1 ,414 

808 
1 ,039 



279 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Stockellburg , Arthur A. $ 

Stoudt, Howard W. & Jean H. 
Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 
Street, Earle B. & Janet H. 
Striker, William W. &, Marjorie B. 
Sturgis, Alanson H., Jr. &, Anne H. 
Sullivan, Gladys G. 

Summers, Richard B. & Winifred F. 
Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 
Swanson, Alfred &, Evelyn Aiken 
Swanson, Arthur W. &, Helen K. 
Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 
Swartz, Eli &, Jeanette U. 
Sweeney, Joseph E. & Jeanne M. 
Swift, Orlando B. 
Swift, Orlando B. & Janice B. 
Swift, William N. & Phyllis C. 
Swinconeck, John J. &, Sophie 
Sykes, David F. & Margaret P. 
Sylvia, Lawrence M. &, Barbara L. 



$ 



Trustee 
Jr . & 



Jr. 

P. &, Rhoda K. 



2 , 250 



70 



Taillacq, Elsie 
Tarbell , George G. , 
Tarbell, George G. , 

Dorothy C . 
Tarky, Vincent T. 
Tarky, William J., 
Taschioglou, Kemon 
Taylor, Edward S. 
Taylor, Frederick B. &, Lex H. 
Taylor, Theodore C. & Barbara G. 
Taylor, W. Royce &, Dorothy V. 
Teabo, Prince C. &, Elizabeth T. 
Tead, Eleanor K. 

Telling, Irving & Jane Cushman 
Tennessee Gas Transmission Co. 
Tetreault, Arthur Hubert & Anne 
Tetreault, Arthur H. & Claire F. 
Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. &, Laura 
Thomas, Peter A. & Muriel M. 
Thompson, Donald J. 
Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. & 

Ar lene 
Thompson, Lawrence E. & Dorothy A. 
Thorpe, Margaret M. 

Tingey, William H., Jr. &, Ruth V. 
Tingley, Frederick M. & Dilla G. 
Titus, William A. & D. Marion 
Tobey, Aubrey C. & Cynthia W. 



49 , 250 



3 

6 
6 
8 
9 

10 
6 
9 
6 
9 

10 

6 
8 

12 
13 
2 
13 
12 

5 
27 

12 

38 

2 

11 

20 
12 

7 
10 

6 
13 
10 

7 

9 

24 

20 

6 

19 

13 

15 
11 

15 
9 
3 

1 



000 
150 
910 
630 
520 
140 
080 
370 
820 
680 
800 

750 
470 

900 
650 
920 
820 
000 

480 
900 

080 
250 
320 
000 
030 
220 
500 
170 
380 
300 
570 
750 
870 
340 
830 
620 
900 
350 

350 
150 
100 
830 
980 
220 
120 



$ 



23 

47 
53 
66 
73 
78 
46 
72 
52 
74 
83 
17 
51 
65 

99 
1 ,05 

22 
1 ,06 

92 



421 
2,148 



93 
2,94 

17 
84 

1 ,54 
94 
57 
78 
49 

1 ,02 
81 

3,85 
60 
71 

1 ,91 

1 ,58 
53 

1 ,48 



1 ,027 

1 ,166 

854 

1 , 218 

768 

247 

86 



280 



VALUATION LIST. JANUARY l. 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Todd , C . Le 

David & 
Todd, Mabel 
Tol er , Loui 
Tonse t h , Di 
Tor ode, Her 
Tor r ey , Vol 
Tracey , Eli 
Tr acey , Eli 
Tracey , Rob 
Tracey ' s Se 
Tr o i s i , Fer 
Truewor t hy , 
Tuc ker , Gar 
Tunnell , Ra 
Turner , Cha 
Tyler , E t he 
Ty 1 er , He i r 



e , Jr . , Eveleth R . , $ 
John 

H. 
se C . 

drick L. & Phebe L. 
bert L. &. Lorraine S. 
ta W. & Geneva DeF . 
zabe t h C . 

zabeth M. &, Joseph R. 
e r t J a 

r v i ce Stat i on 
d i n a n d L . & Mary G . 

Thurston C. & Helen F 
dner 

ymond W. & Suzanne D. 
rles F . & Winifred A. 
1 A. , Admx . 
s of Wat son 



S 



Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 

Valley Pond Realty Trust 
Vance , Jane K . 

Vandell, Robert F. & Margaret E. 
Van Dorn, Walter G. &. Joan S. 
Van Leer, Hans L. 
Van Leer, Hans L. & Mary K. 
Van Leer, R. Karl & Rachel D. 
Van Ummersen, Luther &. Lynn C. 
Van Wart, Walter L. &, Stephenia 
Venier, Ettore P. &. Mary E. 
Vercollone, Edmund S. & Julia 
Vitale, Joseph A. & M. Frances 

Wadsworth, Charles Y. &. Virginia 
Waible, Wendell J. & Florence E. 
Walen , Roger S . 

Roger S. & Constance M. 

Andrew M. & Betty R. 

I sabel G. 

R. Langdon & Ruth W. 
Sidney A. 
Wallach, Frances D. 
Walter, Charlton M. & Rosly M. 
Walton, Frank E. & Julie 
Wang, An & Lorraine C. 
Ward, Thomas D. &, Jane L. 
Ward, Walter B. & Sophie E. 
Ward, Walter B., Jr. & Marie L. 



Walen , 
Wales , 
Wales , 
Wales , 
Walker 



1 , 800 
1 , 800 



80 



5 
25 

7 

8 

5 

15 

20 
7 

4 
1 
6 
11 
6 
3 
4 

9 
8 

2 

3 

11 

5 

17 

13 
7 
6 

20 
9 

11 

30 
9 

12 

17 

21 

14 

15 

13 

17 

6 

22 

7 

7 

7 



920 
650 
800 
320 
700 
150 
80 
100 
050 

500 
050 
750 
180 
900 
980 
130 

300 
480 

240 
150 
550 
250 
680 
850 
210 
050 
220 
770 
000 
850 

150 

080 

000 
550 
980 
470 
9 70 
940 
170 
750 
650 
730 
590 
130 



455 

1 ,975 

600 

640 

438 

1 , 166 

6 

1 ,547 

681 

138 

346 

80 

519 

860 

531 

306 

318 

716 
652 

172 

242 

889 

404 

52 

1 , 374 

1 ,017 

542 

478 

1 ,599 

693 

912 



2 , 32 
69 

92 

1 , 35 

1 , 69 

1,11 

1 , 22 

1,07 

1 , 32 

51 

1 , 74 

59 

58 

54 



281 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY l, 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Per sonal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 

Real and 

Personal 

Estate 



Warner, Henriettas. $ 

Warner, John Burton &, Barbara K. 

Washburn, Mabel L. &, Rachel W. 

Washburn, Rachel W. 

Watts Realty Corporation 

Weatherbee, Robert E. 

Webb, Rosella 

Webster, David & Winifred W. 

Weiss, Alfred D. & Anne Kelly 

Welch, Vernon F. & Leatrice June 

Weld, Richard S. 

Wells, George & Katherine W. 

Wes-Lex Corporation 

Westcott, Vernon C. & Mary Alice 

Western Union Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Wethersfield Trust 

Whalen, William B. & Mary E. 

Wheeler', Ann H. , Mary L., 

Leonard A, , & Dexter , 

Gwendolyn Gale & Wallace D. 
White, John R. & Gina R. 
White, Katharine S. & John W. 
White, Robert E. & Marion J. 
Wil bor , John S . 
Wiley, G. Arnold & Helen P. 
Wilfert, Fred J. & Eleanor M. 
Wilfert, Walter A. & Eleanor A. 
Wilfert, Walter A. & Eleanor A., 

Fred J. &, Eleanor M. 
Willemin, Julian V. 
Willemin, Julian V. & Jane A. 
Williams, Edwin L., Jr. & Ruth D. 
Williams, William G. &, Jane C. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 
Willmann, Werner S. & Margaret M. 
Wilson, Elizabeth & Flaherty, 

Anthony J. 
Wilson, Louise H. 

Wilson, Montgomery S. &, Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert D. & Kathryn M. 
Winchell, Gordon D. & Enid M. 
Winchell, Gordon D., Guilbert S., 

Richard P. & Love, Dorothy W. 
Winchell, Guilbert & Est. of 

Evel y n 
Winchell , Gu i 1 b e r t S . 
Winchell, Guilbert S. & Amy Jane 
Winship, Lee C. & Joyce L. 
Winship, Thomas 
Winship, Thomas &. Elizabeth C. 



2,100 



70 



$ 



140 



150 



18 

16 

8 

1 
4 
9 
9 

12 
7 
8 

15 
8 

10 

9 
5 



530 
350 
470 
80 
580 
950 
150 
340 
000 
500 
920 
820 
850 
350 

000 
550 



31 ,430 

21 , 680 

21 , 490 

9 ,920 

10 , 650 

6 , 620 

7,950 

8 , 700 

150 



8 
12 
6 
2 
5 

9 

2 

9 

10 

10 

13 

26 

6 
12 



630 
900 
450 
250 
700 

450 
100 
750 
800 
800 

400 

550 

670 

750 



$1 

1 



426 
258 
652 
6 
121 
381 
704 
719 
924 
577 
686 
218 
681 
796 
161 
693 
427 



.81 
.95 
.19 
.16 
.66 
.15 
.55 
.18 
,00 
.50 
.84 
.14 
.45 
.95 
.70 
.00 
. 35 



2, 420 
1 , 669 
1 , 654 
763 
820 
509 
612 
669 



11 
5 
6 £4 
993 
496 
173 
438 



19 ,950 



2 ,044 

10 

513 

981 

11 

1 , 536 



11 
36 
73 
84 
05 
74 
15 
90 

55 

39 
51 
30 
65 
25 
90 



727.65 
161. 70 
750. 75 
831 .60 
831.60 

1 ,031 .80 



35 
78 
59 
75 
55 
15 



282 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1. 1964 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Real 
Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Wirsig, Stanley S. & Arlene B. 
Witherby, Thomas H. &, Marianne 
Witherton, John R. & Emily A. 
Withey, Edward L. &. Barbara H. 
Wollmar, Dick J. &, Mary Lou 
Wood, Frank H. &. Jeanne R. 
Wood, George A., Jr. & Nancy S. 
Wood, James D. & Ruth E. 
Wood , Lizz ie 
Wood, 0. Chester (Estate of) & 

Hilve V. 
Wood, Robert C. & Margaret B. 
Wood, Robert M. & June W. 
Woodington, W. Gordon &. Mary L. 
Woods, Henry A. & Barbara R. 
Worsham, Jack L. & Charlotte A. 
Worthington, Thomas K. &, 

El izabeth C . 

Yagjian, Jacob &. Inez 

Yeuell, Kay M. & Suzanne R. 

Yore, George P. 

Yore, George P. 

Yos , Jerrold M. 

Young, Edward L 

Young, David B. 

Young, Lee A. & 

Young, Niels 0. 



$ 



$ 



& Kathleen 

& Ann B. 



& Cora S . 
Jane C . 
& Lucy J. 



Zarella, Joseph S. &, Lillian M, 
Ziegler, Elmer H. & Hilda M. 
Zinck, Floyd A. & Elma W. 
Zuelke, Laurence W. & Nancy J. 



20 



10 

19 
8 

12 
8 

12 
8 
7 
6 

7 

7 

15 

12 

10 

8 



1 
8 

6 
9 
4 
5 
18 
5 

1 

7 

10 

5 



050 
730 
400 
460 
920 
300 
850 
500 
750 

660 
280 
830 
370 
130 
250 

380 

280 
550 

730 
900 
800 
410 
000 
550 

050 
650 
800 
920 



$ 773 
1 , 519 
646 
959 
686 
947 
681 
577 
519 

589 
560 
1 , 218 
952 
780 
635 



98 
658 
1 
518 
762 
369 
416 
386 
427 



85 
21 
80 
42 
84 
10 
45 
50 
75 

82 
56 
91 
49 
01 
25 



722. 26 



56 
35 
54 
21 
30 
60 
57 
00 
35 



80 . 85 
589 .05 
831 . 60 
455 .84 



283 



TRUST FUNDS 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at Dec. 31, 1963, per prior report 
Less portion of reported 1963 income, 
credited to this account in error 
Corrected cash balance at January 1, 1964 
1964 interest income 
Withdrawn from savings bank 
Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premium 



$ 327.13 



50.00 

$ 277.13 

218.09 

90.00 

1 .30 

$ 586.52 



Paid per order of Commissioners of Trust Funds: 
Post 1272 VFW Band, for July 4 

celebration $265.00 

Deposited in savings bank 200.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 21 . 89 



486.89 



Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



$ 99 . 63 



Cash and Securities at December 31. 1964 



First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

1000 Southern California Edison 3% 9/1/65 

1000 Southern Rwy . Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 

1000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 1983 

1000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 

1000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8% 1986 



$ 99.63 

354.03 

187.12 

1 ,000.00 

989 .20 

1 ,000 .00 

1 , 000 .00 

1 .028.25 

$ 5 . 658.23 



Accumulated income 
Pr inc ipal 



$ 461.34 
5 .196.89 
5 . 658.23 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 



Cash Account 



Savings bank interest of 1964 paid to Town of 
Lincoln 



$ 



49 .42 



Savings Bank Deposits at December 31. 1964 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Cambridge Savings Bank 



$ 722.00 

495.52 

$ 1 . 217.52 



284 



TRUST FUNDS 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Ac c oun t 



Cash balance at January 1, 1964 

Income received in 1964: 
Julia A. Bemis Fund 
Codman Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
John H. Pierce Fund 
George Russell Fund 
Abbie J. Stearns Fund 
George G. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar &, Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
Edith B. Farrar Memorial Fund 
Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 
Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 
Lincoln Public Library Fund 



$ 844.54 



28 


.14 


20 


.40 


6 


.44 


44 


.96 


18 


.18 


98 


. 77 


1 31 


.68 


70 


.12 


14 


.51 


6 


.72 


6 


.72 


71 


.87 



518 .51 



Donations received: 

Mrs. Bradford Cannon, for books for 

the DeNormandie Room 
To Farrar Memorial Fund 



D: 



Ed 



win 



Col 



for record s 



U. S. Treasury 5% bonds in Wheeler and 

Stearns Funds matured 
Withdrawn from savings banks for purchase 
of books : 

Julia A. Bemis Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

Public Library Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

Codman Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Payments per order Library Trustees: 

for books - from Cannon gift for 

DeNormandie Room $100.00 

for books - from trust fund 

accumulated income 669.41 

for records - 48.36 

Maryalice Thoma, Librarian, Pierce 

Fund income 44.96 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 263.96 

Deposited in various savings banks 684.58 

U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% bonds purchased 

for the Wheeler and Stearns Funds 1 . 982 .00 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



200 


.00 


5 


.00 


45 


.00 


2,000 


.00 


70. 


00 


110 


.00 


200 


.00 


40 


.00 


50 


.00 


40 


.00 


15 


.00 



$4,138 .05 



3. 793.27 
$ 344.78 



285 



:s 






Ir ■': -. 



- - - ^ : - - 



5.22 



S 5 54.1= S f 5 f . 1 _ 



----„__ 



::lr = e? _ r. = ": i t _ r i : r. 
f : r 5 a v i n z s 



^"4.59 



-. "5 .21 



i : r 5£Tiirs 



1=5.55 



15 5.55 



500.00 



- 



R14 =i 7 



- - j_ - - 



415.74 



421 . : 5 



r . : : 



12.:: 



:::.:: 



r 4 2 . : : 



4 : 



■ • . . 



* ^ — =.- 



r :r 



: : : : = 

1000 fes 

4 1 ; " 



: : . : -. 



. ^ - 



147.30 

991.08 
1,000.00 



! " 



Sir:.: SI ,9-42.00 



157.64 

996. 2 4 
1,000.00 



1 ooo oo 



" 






: 5 



14.1" 



-l ■ : -". 



11/15/73 



? . : : 



??i.:: 

1 2 2 5.46 



s . : : 



2 4 9 . -. '; 



S 1 . 2 4 5 . € 2 



^ - 1 



TRUST FUNDS 



Accumul ated 
Income 
on Depos 1 t 

Edith B. Farrar Memorial Fund 
First National Bank of Boston 
Middlesex Institution 

for Savings $ 14.51 



Pr i nc ipal 



$ 



5 .00 



435.00 



Total 



5 .00 

449 .51 



$ 440 .00 $ 454 .51 



Mary 


Jane Mu 


r r ay 


F 


ar nswor 


th 


Fun 


d 


Bos 


ton 5C 


Sav i n 


^ r 


s Bank 








Alice 


Down i n 


g Har 


t 


Floyd 


Fund 




Bos 


ton 5<? 


Savi n 


S 


s Bank 








Li nc o 


In Publ 


i c Li 


b 


rary Fund 







Middlesex Institution 
for Savings 

Cannon gift, for DeNormandie 
Room books - 

First National Bank of Boston 



6 . 72 



6 . 72 



70 .49 



250 .00 



221 . 78 
$376 . 64 



256. 72 
256. 72 

1 , 748. 70 

100 .00 

-- 221 . 78 

$ 11 , 869 . 89 $ 12 , 246 . 53 



250 .00 



1 , 678. 21 



100 .00 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 



Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1964 
Interest income in 1964 

Payments to needy persons, per order 

of Sel ec tmen : 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 

Cash balance- at December 31, 1964 



$ 48.63 



28 . 30 



$ 193.86 

160.82 

$ 354.68 



76.93 



277 .75 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1964 

First National Bank of Boston 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 
2000 U. S. Treasury 4 5/8% 5/15/65 
1000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 1983 



$ 277.75 

725.51 

2 , 000 .00 

1 ,000 .00 

$ 4 , 003 . 26 



Accumulated income 
Pr inc ipal 



$ 2 , 778. 21 
1 , 225 . 05 



287 



TRUST FUNDS 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 



Cash Account 







$ 


3, 723.37 


$ 


500 .00 
400 .00 
400 .00 
300 .00 
277.00 
21.50 
115.00 






$2 


,013.50 
991 .00 








84.91 




3 , 089 .41 






$ 


633.96 



Cash balance at January 1, 1964 $ 1,338.33 

Interest income received in 1964 1,375.86 

Proceeds of $1000 U. S. Treasury 5% bond matured 1,000.00 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 9.1 



Payments per order Bemis Fund Trustees 
Jan. 10 - Joy Adamson 
Feb. 28 - Woodrow Wilson Sayre 
Apr. 10 - Jackie Washington 
Dec. 4 - Bud Collins 
Printing and postage, notices 
Police attendance at lectures 
Movie projection 



1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

purchased 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 

Cash and Securities at December 31. 1964 

First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

1000 Southern California Edison 3% 9/1/65 

3000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

2000 International Bank for Reconstruction 

4 1/2% 12/1/73 
3000 American Tel. &, Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 
3000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 1986 
1000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8% 1986 
3000 Western Massachusetts Electric 4 3/8% 1987 
2000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 
1000 Idaho Power 4 3/4% 1987 
1000 Alabama Power 3 7/8% 1988 
3000 Pacific Tel. &, Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 
3000 New England Power 4 5/8% 1991 
3000 Atchison Topeka &, Santa Fe Gen'l 4% 1995 



Accumulated income $ 1,522.18 

Principal 31 .902.54 

$33.424.72 



$ 


633 


.96 




625 


.42 


2 


,112, 


.48 




952 


,50 


2 


,984 


.25 




991, 


,00 


1 


,993, 


.75 


3 


,026, 


,67 


2 


,913, 


,75 


1 


,028, 


.25 


3 


,000, 


.00 


2 


,000, 


,00 


1 


,012. 


, 30 


1 


,000. 


,00 


3 


,104. 


10 


3 


,046. 


.29 


3 


,000. 


,00 


$33 


,424, 


,72 



288 



TRUST FUNDS 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash balance at January 1, 1964 
Donations received in 1964: 

General Appeal (10 4 donations) 

July 4 parking fees 

Lincoln School Association 

In memory of Matthew H. Doherty 
( add i t ional ) 

Lincoln Grange 

Lincoln 4-H Club 

Sudbury Sociables 
Interest income 

Interest applied to amortize bond 
purchase premium 

Payments per order of Fund Trustees: 
Balance of 1963 grants: 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture, 

Allen M. Bowles 
Pembroke College, Karla Humphreys 
Earlham College, Leslie Miller 
Marquette University, Anne Remmes 
First half of 1964 grants: 

West Virginia Wesleyan College, 

Sandra Louise MacFarland 
University of Massachusetts, 

Janet Hankey 
Kearney State College, Linda Lee 

Cor r igan 
Chadron State College, Allen W. 

Powers 
Salem College, Douglas C. Bowles 
Boston University, Dennis Foley 
MacMurray College, Barr A. Jozwicki 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture, 

Allen M. Bowles 
Boston Conservatory of Music, 

Suzanne Jean Fedock 
State College at Worcester, Donna 

Br iggs 
Printing and mailing Appeal letters 

Deposited in savings bank 
Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



$ 1,177.88 



$1 , 340 .00 

680 .87 

86 . 25 

7 2.00 

25 .00 

10 0.00 

2 8 .00 



750.00 



1 , 325 .00 



53.41 



$2,128 .41 
1 , 000 .00 



2 ,962. 12 
445 .51 

,_40_ 

$ 4 , 585 .91 



342.15 3 ,470 .56 
$ 1 , 115 . 35 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1964 



First National Bank of Boston 
Provident Institution for Savings 
1000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 
1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 6/1/89 



$ 1 , 115 . 35 

9 ,066 .05 

994. 75 

1 , 004.98 

$ 12 , 181 .13 



289 



TRUST FUNDS 



Reserved for balance of 1964 grants $ 1,075.00 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 1,000.00 

4-H Horse Club Fund 1,325.00 

General Fund 8 . 781 . 13 

$ 12 , 181 .13 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1964 $ 5.23 

Interest income received in 1964 1,002.18 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premium 10.22 

2000 U. S. Treasury 5% bonds matured 2 . 000 .00 

$ 3,017.63 

Paid to town of Lincoln $1,002.18 

2000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

purchased 1 . 982.00 2.984.18 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 $ 33. 45 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1964 

First National Bank of Boston $ 33.45 

Cambridge Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

1000 U. S. Treasury 4 5/8% 5/15/65 

1000 Southern California Edison 3% 9/1/65 

1000 Northern Pacific RR Equip. Trust 2 3/4% 8/10/66 

1000 Western Maryland RR 4% 10/1/69 

3000 Alabama Power 3 1/2% 1/1/72 

1000 Southern Rwy . Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 

2000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

1000 American Tel. & Tel. 2 3/4% 1975 

3000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1979 

1000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2% 1980 

3000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 1983 

1000 Idaho Power 4 1/2% 1987 

2000 General Tel. of California 4 1/8% 1988 

1000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 

1000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5% 1989 





829 


.52 




918 


.76 


1 


, 000 


.00 


1 


, 000 


.00 




9 89 


.95 


1 


,008 


.15 


2 


,949 


.80 




989 


.19 


1 


,982, 


.00 




948 


. 30 


3 


,043, 


.99 


1 


,022, 


.10 


3 


,044, 


.46 


1 


,000, 


.00 


2 


,017, 


.5 6. 


1 


,011, 


,40 


1 


,004, 


,98 


24 


. 793, 


.61 



290 



TRUST FUNDS 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1964 

1963 interest income not recorded in prior 

1964 income - Interest 

- Annuities u/w John H. 

Pi er ce 

- Rent of Pierce House (final) 

- Immunization Clinic fees 
Donation from Lincoln Dancing Class, Inc. 
U. S. Treasury bonds matured 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase 
pr em iums 



Payments per order of Selectmen: 
Well -Child Clinic 
Walden Clinic 
Hospital and medical aid 
Care of Park grounds 
Repairs to Pierce House 
Utilities in Pierce House 
New skating area 

Safe deposit box rent 
Deposited in savings banks 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumul ate 
U. S. Treasury bonds purchased: 

5000 4 1/4% 5/15/74 

3000 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



year 

$1 , 768. 37 

3 , 650 .95 
300.00 
116.55 



$ 1,134.96 
102.22 



280 
900 
366 
834 
399 
315 
778 



00 
00 
68 
40 
10 
35 
03 



$3 , 873 . 56 

17.50 

2 , 000 .00 

392. 59 

5 , 000 .00 
2 ,973. 00 



5 , 835 . 87 

500.00 

8 , 000 .00 

15 . 56 
$15 , 588 . 61 



14 , 256.65 
$ 1 . 331 .96 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1964 

First National Bank of Boston, checking account 

First National Bank of Boston, savings account 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

3500 U. S. Treasury 3 7/8% 5/15/68 

4000 Federal Land Banks 3 7/8% 9/15/72 

2000 Southern Rwy . Equip. Trust 4 1/4% 10/15/72 

3000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/8% 11/15/73 

5000 U. S. Treasury 4 1/4% 5/15/74 

4000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1979 

4000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1985 

1000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8% 1986 

3000 Niagara Mohawk Power 3 5/8% 1986 

5000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 1988 



$ 1 


, 331 , 


,96 


2 


161. 


,86 


3 


003, 


,95 


4 , 


622. 


22 


3 , 


500 . 


00 


4, 


018. 


30 


1 , 


978. 


39 


2 ■ 


973, 


00 


5 , 


000. 


00 


4 , 


065 , 


62 


4 , 


041. 


00 


1 


028. 


35 


2 , 


913. 


75 


5 , 


124. 


32 


$45, 


762. 


72 



291 



TRUST FUNDS 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Cash Account 

Received on May 1, 1964, from the Selectmen, 
account No. 6518 in Concord Cooperative 
Bank with balance of 

(Of this amount $1,200.00 is total of 
donations to date and $97.17 is 
accumulated interest thereon.) 
Additional donation received 
Additional interest income 

Cost of account book $ 8.36 

On deposit in bank, including accumulated 

interest 1 , 337 .01 

Cash balance at December 31, 1964 



$1 ,297.17 



10.00 

39 .84 

$1 , 347.01 



1 , 345. 37 
$ 1.64 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1964 



First National Bank of Boston 
Concord Cooperative Bank 



$ 1.64 

1 , 337 .01 

$ 1 . 338.65 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 128.65 

1 , 210.00 

$1 . 338 .65 



Commissioners of Trust Funds 

Clement C. Sawtell 
Richard F. Schroeder 
William T. King 



292 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Financial Section and Warrant 

of the 

1964 

Town Report 




TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT 
of the 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1964 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Highlights of the Proposed 1965 Budget 



The proposed budget for general purposes, excluding 
the Water Department, for 1965 totals $1,552,799. This 
amount is an increase of $136,222, or 9 . 4% , over the ap- 
proved budget of 1964. This compares with an increase 
of 5.1% in 1964. 

The budgets of the various departments and the per- 
centage change from the previous year are as follows: 

General Government $ 60,829 +15.0% 
Protection of Persons 

Si Property 124,978 +4 # 6% 

Health and Sanitation 16,325 + 1.0% 

Highways 111,175 + 3.0% 

Public Welfare 18,040 + 3.6% 

Elementary School 697,951 +11.0% 

Regional High School 229,698 +16.9% 

Library 37,043 + 5.5% 

♦Recreation 10,708 +24.2% 

Cemeteries 4,100 +0,0% 

Debt Service 181,813 + 3.6% 

Unclassified 57,139 + 8.1% 

Reserve Fund 13,000 + 0.0% 

* Because of reimbursements by participants in 
certain programs, the total cost to the Town 
in 1965 will probably increase over 1964 by 
about $1,000, or 14%. 

In non-school areas the level of services supplied 
by the Town is essentially unchanged. Most of the in- 
crease in the proposed budget comes from higher wages and 
salaries as the number of employees is the same as a year 
ago. The average wage and salary increase is 5%, ex- 
cluding the schools, although there are a few exceptions. 
Teachers' salaries are up 8 to 10%. The salary of the 
Executive Secretary is now included for the full year, 
this position having been created at the Town Meeting in 
March, 1964. The Finance Committee believes this new 
office is being well run and will be of considerable bene 
fit to the Town in the coming years. 

Other important changes in the budget are: $8,500 
more in debt service arising from the issuance of land 
purchase bonds for the DiPerna property and $5,300 in- 
crease in property and indemnity insurance largely the 
result of our new school buildings. 



If the assessed valuation of the Town is $14,284,000, 
the best figure available at this time, every $14,284 of 
additional expenditures will mean $1 more on the tax rate. 

If the proposed budget and all articles in the Warrant 
are approved, we estimate that the tax rate for 1965 will 
be $80, an increase of 3.9% over the $77 rate of 1964, 
However, we again caution the Town that this estimate is 
subject to considerable error. 



Report with Recommended Budget for 1965 

The Finance Committee Report and its recommended Budge 
for 1965 is being published as a "Financial Section to the 
1964 Town Report". This Section also carries the Town 
Warrant and the report of the Long-Term Capital Requirement 
Committee, which is a useful background for current as well 
as long-term considerations. 

We recommend the adoption of the appropriations for 
General Purposes in 1965 itemized in the Financial Supple- 
ment, which total $1,550,874. 

We recommend adoption of a budget for the Water De- 
partment consisting of the several appropriations also 
shown in detail in the Financial Section and totaling 
$60,595 . 

In accordance with the By-Laws, the hearing on the 
Elementary School Budget was held in conjunction with the 
School Committee on January 19. A preliminary hearing on 
the remainder of the budget will be held on Monday, Februar 
15 at 8:00 p.m. at the Town Hall, and a final hearing on 
Thursday, March 4, also at 8:00 p.m. at the Town Hall. 

The various departments returned to the Treasury a 
total of $44,464.96 of unexpended appropriations. The 
following is a list of all that exceeded $1,000.00: 

Planning Board 

Consulting &, Engineering 

Fire Department Salaries 

Highway Salaries 

Highway Maintenance 

Schools, Administration 

Schools, Instruction 

Schools, Operation & Maintenance 

Schools, Acquisition of 

Fixed Assets 
Property & Indemnity Insurance 
Reserve Fund 






$1 


,065 


,00 


1 


,023 


,00 


3 


,965 


,00 


2 


,343 


,00 


7 


,847 


.00 


1 


, 395 


.00 


4 


,934 


,00 


1 


,347 


,00 


1 


,163, 


,00 


2 


, 308, 


,00 


4, 


,793, 


,00 



•: 



The Finance Committee allocated a total of $7,888.14 
>ut of the $13,000 appropriated for emergencies and un- 
foreseen requirements. The list follows: 

Transfers from Reserve 

Legal $1,000.00 

Election Officials 137.50 

Election &. Registration Expense 204.23 

State Census 800.00 

Consulting &. Engineering 1,500.00 

Police Salaries 1,770.10 

Board of Health Expense 75.00 

Highways - Equipment Maintenance 1,440.61 

Highways - Snow Removal 856.65 

Highways - Street Lights 102.21 

LibraryCustodian 1.84 

The Commonwealth has certified "Free Cash" as of 
January 1, 1965, to be $197,978.73. This compares with 
5119,813.40 last year. 

The Finance Committee is again sponsoring an article 
in the Warrant for $10,000 for appropriation to the Stabili' 
zation Fund for foreseeable future expenditures on major 
equipment items. 

The Town Warrant accompanies this report. The 
recommendations of this Committee on each article requiring 
funds are included in the Warrant. 



f! 



Respectfully submitted 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Richard B. Bailey 
Ernest P. Neumann 
Paul L. Norton 
Joseph A. Vitale 
John B. Tew, Chairman 



SCHEDULE OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF 19 64 
AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 19 65 



Appr opr i at ion 
1964 



Expend itures 
1964 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
($60,829. - 3.9%) 



EXECUTIVE 

Selec tmen 

2 . Salar ies 

3. Selectmen's 

personal exp 

4 . Expense s 

5 . Out of State 

travel 



Executive Secretary 
6 . Execut ive 

Secretary 
7. Expenses 



Finance Committee 
10 . Expense 

Town Office 

15 . C ler ks , 

salar ies 

1 6 . Expense 



$ 



300 .00 

300 .00 
450.00 

750.00 
1 ,800 .00 



8 ,550.00 

300.00 

8 , 850.00 



25 .00 



13 , 000 .00 

2.400.00 

15, 400.00 



* Includes $1,050 
to be taken from 
Water Department 
Treasury 



Town Accountant 
20. Salary 
21 . Expense 



Treasurer 

30. Salary 

31 . Expense 



3 ,861 .00 

342 .00 

4, 203.00 



200.00 

958 .00 

1 , 158 .00 



$ 300.00 

300.00 
325 .00 



925 .00 



8 , 550 .00 

285 .00 

8 ,835 .00 



15 .00 



12,999.00 

2. 248.00 

15 , 247.00 



3 ,8 61 .00 

292.00 

4, 153.00 



200.00 

944.00 

1 ,144.00 



Recommend at ions 
1965 



$ 



300.00 

300 .00 
500.00 

300.00 



1 ,400.00 



11,000.00 

300 .00 

11 , 300.00 






25 .00 



14,000 .00 
2 . 250.00 



16, 250.00 



4, 324.00 
265 .00 



4,589.00 



200.00 
950.00 i 



1 ,150.00 



P: 



Tc 



Appropriation Expenditures 
1964 1964 



Recommendations 
1965 



Collector 
1 40 . Salary 
[ 41 . Expense 



$ 2,950.00 

900 .00 

3 , 850 .00 



* Includes $525 
to be taken from 
Water Department 
Treasury 



;\s se ssor s 

| 50 . Salar ies 

I 52. Expense 



550 .00 
800 .00 



1 , 350 .00 



$ 2 , 950. 00 

837 .00 

3 , 787 .00 



550.00 
723.00 



1 , 273.00 



$ 2,950.00* 

900 .00 

3 , 850.00 



550.00 
1 . 100 .00 
1 , 650.00 



iaw 



55. Legal 
5 6, Expense 



flTown Clerk 

60 . Salary 

61. Expense 



2 , 000 .00 

200 .00 

2, 200 .00 



600 .00 

75.00 

675 .00 



[Election &, Registration 
70. Registrars, 

Salaries 200.00 

71 . Election 

Officials 500.00 
72. Expense 666 .00 



, 



Planning Board 



80 . Expense 
Board of Appeals 



81 . Expense 



1 , 366,00 

2 , 300 .00 

250.00 



Conservation Commission 



82. Expense 
Consulting & Eng. 



85 . Expense 
Town Hall 



90 . Cus tod ian 

91. Maintenance 

& Expense 



200.00 



4,000 .00 



2 , 300 .00 

2 ,900.00 
5 , 200.00 



3 ,000.00 

93.00 

3 ,093.00 



600 . 00 

72.00 

672.00 



R 



200.00 



643.00 
870.00 



1 , 713.00 



1 ,234.00 



156.00 



44.00 



4,476.00 

2 ,183.00 

2 .505 .00 
4, 688.00 



R 



3 ,000 .00 

200.00 

3 , 200 .00 



600.00 

75 .00 

675 .00 



200.00 

150.00 

650.00 

1 ,000.00 

3 , 030 .00 

250.00 
200 .00 

7, 600.00 

2 , 410 .00 

2 . 250.00 
4,660.00 



Appropriation Expenditures Recommendations 
1964 1964 1965 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
($124,978. - 8.0%) 

Police Department 

100. Salaries $37,677.00 $39,232.00 R $39,520.00 

101. Expense 3 , 355 .00 3 , 338 .00 3 . 100 .00 

41,032.00 42,570.00 42,620.00 

Fire Department 
110 . Salar ie s & 

Wages 29,876.00 25,910.00 30,543.00 

112. Expense 3,642.00 3,647.00 R 3,700.00 

113. Hydrant 

Service 3 , 495 .00 3 ,495 .00 4 . 395 .00 

37,013.00 33,052.00 38,638.00 

C ommunicat ions 

121. Wages 13,200.00 12,580.00 13,200.00 

122. Expenses 3 , 860 .00 3 , 843 .00 4 . 625 .00 

17,060.00 16,423.00 17,825.00 



C ivil Defense 



R 



123. Expense 500.00 692. 00 n 500.00 

Fire & Police Bldg. 

125. Maintenance 

& Expense 3,960.00 3,831.00 3,635.00 

126. Outside 

Rentals 8 00.00 800 .00 800 . 00 



4,760.00 4,631.00 4,435.00 

Inspectors of Bldgs. 

128. Inspection 

Fees 1,250.00 1,096.00 1,250.00 

129. Expense 100.00 7.00 100 .00 

1,350.00 1,103.00 1,350.00 

Park Department 

130. Tree Warden, - 

Salary 200.00 200.00 200.00 

135. Salaries &, 

Wages 13,966.00 13,767.0